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  • ID: I1002
  • Name: Adelia McCrea
  • Surname: McCrea
  • Given Name: Adelia
  • Sex: F
  • Birth: 30 Jan 1880 in Roscommon Co., Michigan
  • Death: 8 Jan 1962 in St. Petersburg, Florida
  • Burial: Gracelawn Cemetery, Flint, Genesee Co., MI
  • _UID: CDB02FF908D7264EBAD9B5CD436CDA049A34
  • Note:
    From the Michigan Press Clipping Bureau
    Michigan - Roscommon Herald-News (Jan 12, 1962)

    Dr. Adelia McCrea Dies In Florida

    Dr. Adelia McCrea, 81, a pioneer resident of Roscommon, passed away in St. Petersburg, Florid a, on January 8. Dr. McCrea, a resident of Higgins Lake, suffered a heart attack last sprin g and was taken to Grayling Mercy Hospital where she was a patient until late summer, when sh e was able to be taken to Flint. Later in the fall she regained strength enough to travel t o St. Petersburg, Fl.

    Adelia McCrea was born in Roscommon County, the daughter of James B. and Isabel McCrea. Sh e was a graduate of the University of Michigan with a doctor of science degree. After bein g employed by the Park Davis Science Department in Detroit for many years, she retired in 194 1. Since her retirement Miss McCrea spent her winters in California and Florida and her summ er at her Higgins Lake home. Dr. McCrea was a member of the Order of Eastern Stars.

    Surviving are two sisters, Mrs. Ellen Audley and Miss Jessie B. McCrea of St. Petersburg, Flo rida; four cousins and several nieces and nephews.

    The body will lie in state at the Groves Memorial Company Chapel, Garland at 3rd Avenue, Flin t, at 12 noon on Friday. Funeral services will be held on Saturday, January 13, with Rev. Sa m Evans officiating and burial will be in Gracelawn Cemetery, Flint.

    ADELIA MCCREA, SCIENTIST, DIES AT 81

    Miss Adelia McCrea, 81, who established the fungus study department at Parke-Davis Drug Co. , Detroit, died Monday (Jan. 8, 1962) in a local hospital.

    Miss McCrea, a mycologist and plant geneticist, formed the department when she warked as par t of a team of scientists developing Digitalis, a drug used in the treatment of heart disease .

    A mycologist studies properties and phenomena of fungi. In connection with her research, sh e traveled throughout the nation, sponsored by her firm and the American Association for th e Advancement of Science, reading research papers to scientific groups.

    She retired from the drug company 21 years ago and for a short time taught school in Wyandott e, Mich.

    Miss McCrea had been a winter visitor to St. Petersburg for three years. She lived at 5520 4 4th St. N. with her two sisters, Mrs. Ellen M. Audley and Jessie McCrea.

    Besides her many professional affiliations, she also belonged to the OES and was a past-presi dent of the Detroit Business Women's Club. She received her doctorate from the University o f Michigan. burial will be in Flint, Michigan, with Downs-Ford Funeral Home in charge, local ly.
    _________________________________________________
    THE NEWS (DETROIT) Monday, November 29, 1943

    'Know More Than Men and Get Along,' Says Scientist
    "Dr. Adelia McCrea Finds Fungi Are Interesting"
    By Ethel Bogardus

    To realize that fungi are fun and science stimulating--talk to Dr. Adelia McCrea, pionee r in her field. Retired, but certainly not vegetating, is the charming, alert woman whose sp arkling brown eyes will never cease their quest for more fascinating lore in her chosen field .
    Dr. McCrea, who spent 21 years as the only woman research staff member for Parke Davi s & Co., manufacturing chemists, is visiting her sister, Miss Jessie McCrea, of the Public We lfare Department. You may run in to her one day poking around mossy hillsides, or scanning t he ocean beach for odd bits of sea life. You may not recognize the slender figure as a scien tist famous, in her own field, for in spite of her white hair, Dr. McCrea doesn't look old en ough to retire.
    Denied Hobbies
    "Parke Davis usually retired women at 55 but they let me stay on another five years," sh e smiled. "They believed that people should retire while they are still young enough to do t he things they've always wanted to do."
    Travel and photography, the two hobbies this feminine mycologist hoped to enjoy, are for bidden her by war conditions--but she's having fun just the same. She chuckles when she read s about penicillin, for instance, currently hailed as the magic drug.
    "My collegues(sic) have worked with the various features of fungi for many years, but on ly recently are their extensive properties being explored."
    Research Interesting
    Dr. McCrea was teaching science at the close of World War I, and became much intereste d in the fungus diseases of many men returning from Europe. Parke Davis was looking for suc h a research expert--so Dr. McCrea went to work. Modestly, she won't tell which of the man y remedies put out by that drug firm are the result of her careful study. Nor will she menti on that she was official delegate to several international scientific institutes, but she doe s say that science offers a new and promising field to the woman with the inquiring mind.
    "Research has barely scraped the surface of the possibilities in the study of fungi an d of plant pathology. The average person knows very little even about molds. For instance , the mold You scrape off a slice of bread is a twin of the species You relish in roquefort c heese."
    This branch of science is of particular interest to women, McCrea believes. Did she enc ounter the general prejudice against ......[article truncated]
    _____________________________________

    Michigan History, Volume 10, page 187
    Referred to Adelia McCrey as a principal & teacher at Sterling School
    *************************************************************************************
    The Illustrious Career of Adelia McCrea (My Title)
    ********************************************************
    McCrea, Adelia, research mycologist; b. Roscommon, Mich., Jan. 30, 1880; daughter of James B . and Isabelle (Cameron) McCrea; educated Ferris Institute (1913), Michigan State Normal Coll ege (1915), Univ. of Michigan (A.B., 1919; Ph.D., 1930). Teacher in Michigan schools, includ ing Northville and Highland Park, 1897-99, 1904-19; research in medical mycology, Parke Davi s & Co., since 1919. Contributor to Journal of American Pharm. Assn., Science, Physical Ther apeutics, Papers of Michigan Academy of Science, Arts & Letters, Journal of Tropical Medicin e & Hygiene, Journal of Lab. and Clin. Medicine, American Journal of Bot., Mycologia. Worl d War: in charge Barberry Eradication, Northville. Member; Sigma XI; Michigan Academy of Sc ience; (F.) A.A.A.S.; Mycological Society of America; Botanical Society of America. Independ ent in Politics.
    Clubs: Detroit Business Womens (Vice-Pres. 1933-34); Women's City, of Detroit; Order of East ern Star. Recreations: hiking; nature study; making hooked rugs; a football fan. Home: 44 24 Helen Ave. Office: Parke, Davis & Co.
    (Excerpt from Who's Who in Detroit 1935-36, Page 212 - Walter Romig & Co., 10457 Gratiot Ave ., Detroit.)
  • Change Date: 19 Nov 2009 at 11:12:10



    Father: James B. McCrea b: 4 Sep 1850 in Montague Twp., Lanark, Ontario, Canada
    Mother: Isabelle Cameron b: 19 Jan 1857 in Michigan or Canada

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