Rice, Humphrey, Shattuck,Gervais, Beaudette, Angell, Hammond and allied lines

Entries: 15315    Updated: 2009-04-21 17:57:09 UTC (Tue)    Owner: Gerald

Index | Descendancy | Register | Download GEDCOM

  • ID: I14397
  • Name: Edward Colcord
  • Sex: M
  • Death: 10 FEB 1681/82 in Hampton, Rockingham, NH
  • Note:
    ... a man of independent spirit who chafed under restraint, and loved adventure (and strong drink) 1
    Immigration: ABT 1631 1

    Sources:
    Title: Master File.ftw
    Repository:
    Media: Other
    Text: Date of Import: Aug 26, 2002


    from

    Masland Family Tree
    Entries: 15978 Updated: 2006-05-29 10:46:44 UTC (Mon) Contact: Frank Masland

    Edward was a witness "Wheelwright deed" in 1638. He was in Hampton in the 1640s. Among many other things, he was Stephen BACHILER's attorney in 1651. Noyes/Libby/Davis, "Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire," (1939), p. 154.

    In 1661 a petition was collected against him for barratry (starting frivolous lawsuits), for which he was arrested. However, he was employed
    on many occasions to gather evidence for court suits. In general, his manner of doing business often took him to court; if that did not create
    enough trouble for him, he earned more by appearing as attorney for various causes against local vested interest, including patent claims not seen as valid by the local settlers. On 4 NOV 1645 at Ipswich he was fined in court "for drinking wyne to the abuse of himselfe". Also on 12 FEB 1649 he was so "verrie far gone with drinke". He had numerous fines for excessive drinking and alcoholism over a period of years.

    He must have learned the Indian tongue as Wheelwright employed him to make his purchase in 1638. At Dover he was Commissioner to end small causes, and in 1642 was Rep. to the General Court in Boston. Later he claimed to be agent of the patentees for collecting their rents in Dover( Hubbard called him apochryphal governor), and in 1647 Richard Cutt, Pickering and Nutter were appointed referees between Edward Colcord and the town of Dover. He had removed to Hampton in 1645, and was about then removed to Exeter. In 1651 he was bringing suits as attorney for Rev. Stephen Bachiler. In 1654 he was an owner in the Dover and Swampscot patents, and had bought James Wall's mill at Exeter, hiring it run by Anthony Day and Thomas Tyler the Indian. In 1661 he was arrested for barratry and petition was freely signed to shut him out of the courts. In 1676 he was employed by Major Waldron to collect evidence against the Mason claim and Aug 11 1681 in Boston prison, he was allowed 5lbs. for 33 days service of self and horse under orders of Gov. Leverett. One of the best, and to many most unfavorably, known New Englanders of his day, he spent his life looking for trouble, reckless of all manner of abuse, except when accused of picking a drunken man's pocket

    [Note] [From Colcord Genealogy. Descendants of Edward Colcord of New Hampshire, 1630-1908, by Doane B. Colcord, 1908.]
    Pages 7-8:
    Edward Colcott, or Colcord, came to Portsmouth, N.H., from Hants County, England, about 1631, when he was fifteen years old. The name is derived from Cole, an old English name, and Cote or Cot, a cottage or house with lands adjoining. The Colcott "Crest" is a sitting lion ("lion sejant") collared and lined with the motto: "Dieu Avec Nous" beneath, which is a part of the coat of arms of the Earl of Berkeley -- conferred by authority. The first Earl of Berkeley was created in 1421 (Burke). His name was also spelled Colcote.

    When Edward cam to Portsmouth, in 1631, "there were," he affirms, "but three houses in all that side of the country adjoining Pascataqua River."

    He went to Exeter and resided in or near there until after 1638. He married Ann (e) Page and was in "Pasquatiquate," or Dover, in 1640, being 5th grantee in the list of the first grants given. He signed a petition for an independent government, sent to the King in 1642, and in 1643, June 14, was appointed "Magistrate" of Dover with two associates by the "Court of Mass." He returned to Exeter in 1644, and by "grants" and trading acquired lands in Dover, Exeter and New Market.

    He was often engaged in litigation, a man of independent spirit who chafed under restraint, and loved adventure. He had many friends and not a few enemies. He raised a large family, the daughters marrying into some of the best of the colonial families, and becoming the mothers of the Dearborn, Hobbs, Fifield, Coffin, and Stevens families. His oldest son, Jonathan, died in his twenty-first year (1661) and his two remaining sons marched to Rhode Island in the King Phillips' War, in which Edward Jr., was slain by the Indians at North Hill, June 13, 1677; a young man of promise "whose death was greatly regretted."

    Edward was now past 60 years old and Februrary 10, 1681-2, he died at Hampton, N.H., where all his children were raised.

    From: HISTORY OF ROCKINGHAM COUNTY NEW HAMPSHIRE
    and Representative Citizens
    By Charles A. Hazlett -- 1915
    Chapter XXXIV

    HAMPTON

    Edward Colcord settled here prior to 1645. A son, Edward, was killed by the Indians in that part of North Hampton known as "Pagetown." "Ould Edward Colcord died in 1681." His wife and family having been abused by him, and fearful of their personal safety, had him confined in jail. He gave bonds to keep the peace, and was discharged. He and his wife Ann having complained of each other for fighting, were both bound over to keep the peace, April 22, 1686

    He must have learned the Indian tongue as Wheelwright employed him to make his purchase in 1638. At Dover he was Commissioner to end small causes, and in 1642 was Rep. to the General Court in Boston. Later he claimed to be agent of the patentees for collecting their rents in Dover( Hubbard called him apochryphal governor), and in 1647 Richard Cutt, Pickering and Nutter were appointed referees between Edward Colcord and the town of Dover. He had removed to Hampton in 1645, and was about then removed to Exeter. In 1651 he was bringing suits as attorney for Rev. Stephen Bachiler. In 1654 he was an owner in the Dover and Swampscot patents, and had bought James Wall's mill at Exeter, hiring it run by Anthony Day and Thomas Tyler the Indian. In 1661 he was arrested for barratry and petition was freely signed to shut him out of the courts. In 1676 he was employed by Major Waldron to collect evidence against the Mason claim and Aug 11 1681 in Boston prison, he was allowed 5lbs. for 33 days service of self and horse under orders of Gov. Leverett. One of the best, and to many most unfavorably, known New Englanders of his day, he spent his life looking for trouble, reckless of all manner of abuse, except when accused of picking a drunken man's pocket.




    Marriage 1 Anne Warde
      Children
      1. Has Children Sarah (Shuah)Colcord b: 12 JUN 1662 in Hampton, Rockingham, NH
    • We want to hear from you! Take our WorldConnect survey

      Index | Descendancy | Register | Download GEDCOM

      Printer Friendly Version Printer Friendly Version Search Ancestry Search Ancestry Search WorldConnect Search WorldConnect Join Ancestry.com Today! Join Ancestry.com Today!

      WorldConnect Home | WorldConnect Global Search | WorldConnect Help
      We want to hear from you! Take our WorldConnect survey

      RootsWeb.com is NOT responsible for the content of the GEDCOMs uploaded through the WorldConnect Program. The creator of each GEDCOM is solely responsible for its content.