Ancestors of a 21st century British family

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  • ID: I3739
  • Name: Francis Hay
  • Suffix: 9th Earl of Erroll
  • Sex: M
  • Death: 16 JUL 1631
  • Burial: Church of Slains, Aberdeenshire
  • Occupation: Plotter against Elizabeth I
  • Note:

    ERROLL (or ERROL), FRANCIS HAY, 9TH EARL OF (d. 1631),
    Scottish nobleman, was the son of Andrew, 8th earl, and of Lady Jean Hay, daughter of William, 6th earl.
    The date of his birth is unrecorded, but he succeeded to the earldom (cr. 1453) in 1585, was early converted to Roman Catholicism, and as the associate of Huntly joined in the Spanish conspiracies against the throne of Elizabeth. A letter written by him, declaring his allegiance to the king of Spain, having been intercepted and sent by Elizabeth to James in February 1589, he was declared a rebel by the council.
    He engaged with Huntly and Crawford in a rebellion in the north of Scotland, but their forces surrendered at Aberdeen on the arrival of the king in April; and in July Erroll gave himself up to James, who leniently refrained from exacting any penalty. In September of the same year he entered into a personal bond with Huntly for mutual assistance; and in 1590 displeased the king by marrying, in spite of his prohibition, Lady Elizabeth Douglas, daughter of the Earl of Morton. He was imprisoned on suspicion of complicity in the attempt made by Gray and Bothwell to surprise the king at Falkland in June 1592; and though he obtained his release, he was again proclaimed a rebel on account of the discovery of his signature to two of the ?Spanish Blanks,? unwritten sheets subscribed with the names of the chief conspirators in aplot for a Spanish invasion of Scotland, to be filled up later with the terms of the projected treaty. After a failure to apprehend him in March 1593, Erroll and his companions were sentenced to abjure Romanism or leave the kingdom; and on their non-compliance were in 1594 declared traitors. On the 3rd of October they defeated at Glenlivet a force sent against them under Argyll; though Erroll himself was severely wounded, and Slains Castle, his seat, razed to the ground. The rebel lords left Scotland in 1595, and Erroll, on report of his further conspiracies abroad, was arrested by the states of Zealand, but was afterwards allowed to escape. He returned to Scotland secretly in 1596, and on the 20th of June 1597 abjured Romanism? and made his peace with the Kirk. He enjoyed the favour of the king, and in 1602 was appointed a commissioner to negotiate the union with England. His relations with the Kirk, however, were not so amicable. The reality of his conversion was disputed, and on the 21st of May 1608 he was confined to the city of Perth ?for the better resolution of his doubts,? being subsequently declared an obstinate ?papist,? excommunicated, deprived of his estate, and imprisoned at Dumbarton; and after some further vacillation was finally released in May 1611.
    Lord Erroll died on the 16th of July 1631, and was buried in the church of Slains.
    He married (1) Anne, daughter of John, 4th earl of Atholl; (2) Margaret, daughter of the regent Murray; and (3) Elizabeth, daughter of William, 6th earl of Morton.
    By his third wife he had several children, of whom his eldest son, William, succeeded him.
    The dispute which began in his lifetime concerning the hereditary office of lord high constable between the families of Erroll and of the Earl Marischal was settled finally in favour of the former; thus establishing the precedence enjoyed by the earls of Erroll next after the royal? family over all other? subjects in Scotland.
    See The Erroll Papers (Spalding Club Miscellany, vol. ii. 211); Andrew Lang, Hist. of Scotland, vol. ii.; Hist. MSS. Comm. MSS. of Earl of Mar and Kellie; D. Calderwood?s Hist. of the Church of Scotland; John Spalding?s Memorials (Spalding Club, 1850); Collected Essays of T. G. Law, ed. by P. H. Brown (1904); Treason and Plot, by M. A. S. Hume (1901).
    ---
    Mar, John Erskine, 2d (or 7th) earl of, 1558?1634, Scottish nobleman; son of the 1st (or 6th) earl. In 1578 he was persuaded by James Douglas, 4th earl of Morton, to assert his claims to Stirling Castle and the guardianship of the young James VI (later James I of England). Mar emerged in control of the king's person, while Morton attempted to recover his authority. After the rise of Esmé Stuart, duke of Lennox, and James Stuart, earl of Arran, Mar fell out of favor with the king. He participated in the capture of James in the raid of Ruthven (1582). After James's escape, Mar was received at court, but he was banished in 1584 and fled to England. In 1585 he joined the other banished Scottish nobles who invaded Scotland and overthrew Arran. Mar was made a member of the privy council. In 1601 he was sent as ambassador to England to offer secret assistance to the 2d earl of Essex in his rebellion. This was crushed before his arrival, and Mar spent his time negotiating the question of James's succession to the English throne. In 1603 he accompanied James to England and was made a member of the English privy council. From 1616 to 1630 he was lord high treasurer of Scotland.ERROLL (or ERROL), FRANCIS HAY, 9TH EARL OT (d. 1631),
    Scottish nobleman, was the son of Andrew, 8th earl, and of Lady Jean Hay, daughter of William, 6th earl. The date of his birth is unrecorded, but he succeeded to the earldom (cr. 1453) in 1585, was early converted to Roman Catholicism, and as the associate of Huntly joined in the Spanish conspiracies against the throne of Elizabeth. A letter written by him,, declaring his allegiance to the king of Spain, having been intercepted and sent by Elizabeth to James in February 1589, he was declared a rebel by the council. He engaged with Huntly and Crawford in a rebellion in the north of Scotland, but their forces surrendered at Aberdeen on the arrival of the king in April; and in July Erroll gave himself up to James, who leniently refrained from exacting any penalty. In September of the same year he entered into a personal bond with Huntly for mutual assistance; and in 1590 displeased the king by marrying, in spite of his prohibition, Lady Elizabeth Douglas, daughter of the Earl of Morton. He was imprisoned on suspicion of complicity in the attempt made by Gray and Bothwell to surprise the king at Falkland in June 1592; and though he obtained his release, he was again proclaimed a rebel on account of the discovery of his signature to two of the ?Spanish Blanks,? unwritten sheets subscribed with the names of the chief conspirators in a plot for a Spanish invasion of Scotland, to be filled up later with the terms of the projected treaty. After a failure to apprehend him in March 1593, Erroll and his companions were sentenced to abjure Romanism or leave the kingdom; and on their non-compliance were in 1594 declared traitors. On the 3rd of October they defeated at Glenlivet a force sent against them under Argyll; though Erroll himself was severely wounded, and Slains Castle, his seat, razed to the ground. The rebel lords left Scotland in 1595, and Erroll, on report of his further conspiracies abroad, was arrested by the states of Zealand, but was afterwards allowed to escape. He returned to Scotland secretly in 1596, and on the 20th of June 1597 abjured Romanisn and made his peace with the Kirk.
    He enjoyed the favour of the king, and in 1602 was appointed a commissioner to negotiate the union with England. His relations with the Kirk, however, were not so amicable. The reality of his conversion was disputed, and on the 21st of May 1608 he was confined to the city of Perth ?for the better resolution of his doubts?, being subsequently declared an obstinate ?papist?, excommunicated, deprived of his estate, and imprisoned at Dumbarton; and after some further vacillation. was finally released in May 1611.
    Lord Erroll died on the 16th of July 1631, and was buried in the church of Slains. He married (1) Anne, daughter of John, 4th earl of Atholl; (2) Margaret, daughter of the regent Murray; and (3) Elizabeth, daughter of William, 6th earl of Morton. By his third wife he had several children, of whom his eldest son, William, succeeded him.
    The dispute which began in his lifetime concerning the hereditary office of lord high constable between the families of Erroll and of the Earl Marischal was settled finally in favour of the former; thus establishing the precedence enjoyed by the earls of Erroll next after the royal family over all other subjects in Scotland.
    See The Erroll Papers (Spalding Club Miscellany, vol. ii. 211); Andrew Lang, Hist. of Scotland, vol. ii.; Hist. MSS. Comm. MSS. of Earl of Mar and Kellie; D. Calderwood?s Hist. of the Church of Scotland; John Spalding?s Memorials (Spalding Club, 1850); Collected Essays of T. G. Law, ed. by P. H. Brown (1904); Treason and Plot, by M. A. S. Hume (1901).
  • _UID: A5D976780ACD4ACD984FB574E337F9EC696D
  • Change Date: 21 JUL 2008



    Father: Andrew Hay
    Mother: Jean Hay

    Marriage 1 Anne Stewart
    • Married: JAN 1587
    • Note: Contract date

    Marriage 2 Elizabeth Douglas
    • Married: 1590
    Children
    1. Has Children Anne Hay
    2. Has Children Jean Hay
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