Justice-Clinkscales and Close Kin - June 2015

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  • ID: I50511
  • Name: Philip Wilhelm CANSLER
  • Given Name: Philip Wilhelm
  • Surname: Cansler
  • Suffix: (senior)[Gentzler/Kensler]
  • Nickname: +Ann Maria J Wintermyer
  • Name: Philip Wilhelm \Kensler \Cancellor CANSLER (GENTZLER)
  • Given Name: Philip Wilhelm \Kensler \Cancellor
  • Surname: Cansler (Gentzler)
  • Suffix: 1739 1
  • Sex: M
  • _UID: 8BBDD05471EC4B44A238E0D4DE85F79DDDB7
  • Change Date: 16 JAN 2012
  • Note:


    Philip Gentzler and his wife Uly are remembered as the pioneer
    settlers of Lincoln County, North Carolina. Most Cansler's alive
    today draw their ancestry through one of Philip and Uly's ten
    children. Philip's last name appears in a variety of different forms
    in the old colonial and county records. His name is spelled Philip
    Gentzler on his naturalization papers, Philip Gensler on a York
    County, deed of sale, and his tombstone reads Philip W. Genseler. He
    starts his 1801 will with "I, Philip Cancelor of the County of
    Lincoln," but he signs the will in German as Philip Gantzler. Many of
    the clerks of the Court wrote his name as Cancellor or Canseller,
    probably since that is how it sounded to them, as they heard it in
    court. It would be the children of Philip and Uly that would begin to
    consistently use Cansler as the spelling of their last name.
    "Philipp Wilhelm Genzler" was sponsored by his grandfather, Johann
    Philipp Lohr, a tailor.
    John Conrad Gentzler is one of 84 German males to appear on a "List of
    Foreigners Imported in the Ship [IT::IT]Elliot[IT::IT], Captain James
    Adams." The ship arrived in Philadelphia on 24 August 1749, after
    sailing from Rotterdam, with a brief stop in Cowes, England. The
    immigrant men were required to take an Oath of Allegiance to the King
    of England upon landing. Philip Gentzler was around the age of eight
    during this six week sea passage.
    According to Pennsylvania Deed abstracts, Philip Gentzler and wife
    Juliana sells property to Valentine Lau.
    The Great Philadelphia Wagon Road, that Philip Gentzler and his family
    traveled down, was the principal highway of the colonial back country.
    It had been an Indian Warrior's Path until 1744 when the English
    acquired the use of it by treaty. Learning of cheaper lands southward
    in Maryland and Virginia, the Germans and Scotch-Irish began venturing
    down the path. Parke Rouse, in his 1973 book [UL::UL]The Great
    Road[UL::UL], wrote, "led by a few explorers and land speculators, the
    Germanic and Scotch-Irish migrations were to continue for nearly a
    century." By the fall of 1766, the Great Road stretched from
    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Augusta, Georgia. It went through
    Lancaster, York, and Gettysburg in Pennsylvania, through Hagerstown,
    Maryland and into the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. At Big Lick,
    latter to become Roanoke, Virginia, pioneers could take the Wilderness
    Road west through the Blue Ridge Mountains and into Tennessee, or they
    could continue south on the Great Wagon Road into North Carolina. The
    dirt road went through Salisbury and Charlotte and continued south to
    Chester and Newberry, South Carolina, before it reached Augusta. The
    road was most developed in southern Pennsylvania where great taverns
    and inns, serving German delicacies such as saurbraten, schmorbraten,
    apfelklose,and spanferkel, dotted the road.
    By the time of Philip's migration, most of the road had been cleared
    to accommodate horse-drawn vehicles. County courts employed local
    farmers to keep up segments of the road, but the path generally stayed
    in a poor condition. Eighteen miles of progress was a good days work.
    Expert German wagon makers, located near Lancaster, Pennsylvania, were
    famous for their "Conestoga Wagons," and Philip, no doubt, used one on
    this 450 mile journey. The vehicles were built to such a size that
    five or six horses, harnessed in pairs, were required to pull them.
    To lighten the load, people were expected to walk alongside or behind
    the wagon. "A family cow, an ox, a pig or two were sometimes tethered
    to such a wagon. Chickens and other fowl were transported in pens
    suspended from the tailgate." Philip and his family passed farm after
    farm, occasionally coming across forts, taverns, and villages. One of
    their preoccuping thoughts, on this long journey, had to have been the
    knowledge that they would, in all likelihood, never see the family and
    friends that they had left behind in York, Pennsylvania.
    The first record of Philip Gentzler's arrival in western North
    Carolina is the registering of his purchase of 200 acres on the north
    side of the South Fork of the Catawba River on 12 Jan 1767. His
    property was below that of Derrick Ramsours. He purchased the land
    from Daniel Alexander for $35 pounds. This land was then in
    Mecklenberg County, latter to become Tyron County, and then Lincoln
    County.
    "Phillip Kenseler and Youley his wife" sell a tract of 320 acres to
    Philip Noull for 1,000 pounds. The land was on the east side of the
    South Fork of the Catawba River, "on the path between Samuel
    Bickerstaff and Derrick Ramsour's." The land had originally been sold
    to Philip Gentzler by Aaron Bickerstaff. The transaction was
    confirmed in the April 1780 term of the Lincoln Court. It is signed
    by Philip Kensler, an X for Youley Kensyler, ans witnessed by David
    Ramsey and Christian Renhart.
    The American Revolution touched on Philip Gentzler and his family.
    Initially, the outbreak of war between the American colonies and the
    British government had very little impact on the back country of North
    Carolina. The Revolution, in fact, did not have universal support
    among the local Germans. Many of these immigrants had, upon their
    landing in America, given an oath of allegiance to the English King.
    They felt a sense of gratitude to the Crown, for allowing their
    immigration. The Germans had found their local government officials,
    most of whom were English or Scotch-Irish, to be unconcerned with
    their needs and grievances. That these same officials were now the
    leaders of the Rebel faction, no doubt, caught many of these Dutchman
    wrong. By and large, most Germans just wanted to be left out of the
    war, as most felt it was not their struggle. There were, however,
    many significant exceptions, and Germans served as Tories and as Whigs
    in the bitter fighting that took place near Philip Gentzler's farm.
    In January 1779, the local government officials changed the name of
    their county from Tyron to Lincoln County, in honor of the patriot
    General Benjamin Lincoln. In May 1780, the British captured the large
    American garrison at Charleston, South Carolina. The Revolutionary
    War had now moved to the southern colonies. A large veteran British
    army under the capable leadership of General Lord Charles Cornwallis
    was landed in Charleston, and Cornwallis began a slow march northward.
    Spured by British recruiters, local Tories began to gather at the mill
    of Derrick Ramsour. Philip Gentzler's farm was only one mile south of
    Ramsour's Mill. By late June, some 1,100 Tories had assembled there
    to receive arms and military training. On the morning of 20 June
    1780, they were attacked by a force of Rowan and Mecklenburg militia,
    only some 500 in number. Since few had uniforms, the Whigs pinned
    white paper to their hats to distinguish themselves, while the Tories
    used bits of greenery from the trees. It was a savage fight that
    lasted over an hour. The sides exchanged gunfire, but they fought
    mostly hand-to-hand with rifle butts, knives, and tomahawks. When it
    was over some 200 men lay dead and wounded. The Tories had been
    dispersed by the better organized Whig militias. Philip Gentzler was
    39 at the time, and there is no evidence that he participated in the
    Battle of Ramsour's Mill. His friend and neighbor was Adam Reep, a
    noted Whig scout, who led the Whig forces to the Tory camp, suggested
    the plan of attack, and fought in the battle. If Philip was not on
    the battlefield, he could certainly hear the struggle from his farm.
    The wounded probably sought his barn out as a place of refuge.
    In October of 1780, an even larger battle was fought between Whig and
    Tory partisans twelve miles to the south of Philip's home. The Battle
    of King's Mountain was another significant American victory and
    deprived the approaching Cornwallis of local support for his tired
    army. Critical to the victory at King's Mountain was the courageous
    actions of the "South Fork Boys," a company of Lincoln County men. In
    January 1781, General Daniel Morgan annihilated the left wing of
    Cornwallis's army under Colonel Banastre Tarleton at Cowpens, South
    Carolina. Morgan retreated northward with Cornwallis's 4,000 troops
    in pursuit. With the Americans having already crossed the Catawba
    River, the British, stopped at Ramsour's Mill, the site of the earlier
    battle. It was now winter, 25 January 1781. Cornwallis wrote in his
    journal, "I therefore assembled the army on the 25th at Ramsour's Mill
    on the south fork of the Catawba, and as the loss of my light troops
    could only be remedied by the activity of the whole corps, I employed
    a halt of two days in collecting some flour, and destroying
    superfluous baggage, and all my wagons except those loaded for sick
    and wounded." The army camped on both sides of the South Fork with
    Tarleton camped to the south, on or near the Gentzler farm. Foraging
    parties were sent in all directions to collect grain, and Ramsour's
    Mill was kept running day and night to turn the grain into flour. The
    Hessian troops, under the command of the British, enjoyed
    fraternizing with the local Germans, to the point that some of these
    mercenaries deserted their employer. By destroying his baggage in a
    dramatic night time bonfire, Cornwallis was sending a clear signal to
    his army that only hard fighting and marching lay ahead. On the
    morning of the 28th, the British broke camp and marched east 12 miles
    across Lincoln County towards Beattie's Ford. Nixon noted that, "the
    moving Britons, in scarlet uniforms, with glittering muskets, made an
    impressive sight, and tradition still preserves their route." The
    Americans contested the fords on the Catawba, and it was the first of
    February before the British crashed across the Catawba at Cowen's
    Ford, and finally left Lincoln County. Cornwallis would fight a
    bloody draw at Guilford Courthouse, North Carolina in March. His
    heavy losses forced him to retreat to the coast, and, thereby,
    effectively abandon the Carolinas. By October, his army was bottled
    up at Yorktown, Virginia. Unable to escape by sea, Cornwallis
    surrendered to George Washington's French and American army. Peace
    was at hand.
    Philip Gentzler was, as of 1780, a resident of Lincoln County. Up
    until 1841, the county would encompass all of present day Lincoln,
    Gaston, Catawba counties, and much of Cleveland County. In the census
    of 1790, Lincoln would have 9,319 residents, of whom 935 were black
    slaves. In this large geographic county, with primitive roads, it was
    essential to have a courthouse that was centrally located. The state
    legislature, in an act of 1784, appointed five men, including Nicholas
    Friday, as commissioners to locate a new county seat. They selected
    300 acres of "vacant and unappropriated land lying between the lines
    of Philip Kancellor and Christian Reinhardt," on both sides of "the
    wagon road leading from the Tuskaseegee Ford to Ramsour's Mill and
    including the forks of the road leading to Cansler's sawmill." On 29
    December 1785, the North Carolina Assembly ratified an act
    establishing Lincolnton as the new county seat. Fifty of the acres
    were laid off into squares, streets, and half-acre lots, which were
    sold by lottery. A public square, with a log courthouse, was placed
    at the intersection of Main and Aspin streets.
    "Philip Cancellor, Sr." sells 236 acres on the South Fork of the
    Catawba River for 10 pounds to his son "Philip Cancellor, Jr.."
    The land bordered "him" and his brother "Jno Cancellor," a wagon road,
    and an old survey. The court record was signed, "Philip Gentzler."
    Witnesses were Jo Abernathy and "George Cancellor."
    "Philip Gantzler" had a sizable estate to distribute among his wife
    and children. To his wife "Uley," Philip left a "choice of furniture,
    horses, and cattle and all estate not willed to children, during
    widowhood." Son "Philip Cancellor" and wife Uley were the executors
    of the estate. Philip Jr. only received five shillings in the will,
    probably since he had been given the original Cansler homestead on the
    South Fork in 1785. Son John similarily only received 5 shillings.
    Son George received 350 acres of land on Leeper's Creek, including
    "the place I now live on." Son "Conrade" was willed 270 acres "on the
    South Fork, near Lincolnton, on the pine field branch" and 20 pounds
    in money. Daughter "Catherine Cline" received 100 acres of land on
    Indian Creek and 40 pounds in money. Daughter "Margaret Defebaugh"
    was willed 120 acres on Leeper's and Hoyle Creeks, and 40 pounds of
    money. Daughters "Caty Finger, Mary Garden, Elizabeth, and Barbara"
    each received a parcel of land and three cows. Joseph Abernathy and
    Philip Defabaugh witnessed the will.
    In the April 1805 term of the Lincoln County Court of Pleas and
    Quarter Sessions, the following entry was made, "The last will and
    testament of Phillip Canseller, dated 25 May 1801, was proved by
    Joseph Abernathy and Phillip Devebaugh and admitted to record.
    Phillip Canceller, an executor of the last will and testament came
    into open court and qualified accordingly." In the April 1807
    Session, the following entry was recorded, "The Commissioners appoint
    by Court to divide the real estate devised by the Last Will &
    Testament of Phillip Cansler, dec'd. among the several Legatees made
    the following Return which was confirmed by the Court & ordered to be
    registered, viz: To Margaret Tevebaugh: 120 acres, lot #4. To Caty
    Finger: 120 acres, lot #1. To Mary Garden: 120 acres, lot #3. To
    Elizabeth Gansler: 120 acres, lot #5. To Barbara Gansler: 120 acres,
    lot #2.
    Signed by the Commissioners William Scott, J. Graham, Henry Smith,
    David Eddleman, & John Parr.
    Philip W. Gentzler was born in Germany in 1741 and was around eight
    years old when he landed in Philadelphia with his father, mother,
    older sister Magdelena, and two younger brothers, George and Conrad.
    Philip's father was a German bauern, a farmer. On their new land near
    York, Pennsylvania, the young boy must have worked hard to help his
    father clear the forest of trees and bush, grub the roots from the
    ground and prepare the soil for cultivation. They planted wheat which
    they took to market, and rye, or Indian corn, which they and their
    livestock consumed themselves. They built their first house of logs,
    built fences as inclosures for their cows and horses, planted orchards
    and gardens, and eventually built a sturdy barn. All of this work
    would prove to be wonderful training, as Philip would, as a young man
    with a growing family, start from scratch in the forests of North
    Carolina. His father Conradt must have been his principle example and
    teacher.
    Around 1758, Philip married Juliana "Uly" Wintermyer, daughter of
    Philip and Ann Gerthrout Wintermyer, in York County, Pennsylvania.
    The Wintermyer's had been passengers on the [UL::UL]Elliott[UL::UL]
    with the Gentzler's. Philip and Uly were, thus, friends since
    childhood. They would have ten children between 1759 and 1780. The
    first four children were christened at Christ Lutheran Church in York,
    Pennsylvania. It was about the time of their marriage that land
    availiability in the existing "Dutch" communities became tight and
    prices soared. Newcomers seeking cheaper lands were blocked from
    going west by the Alleghany Mountains. Since the 1750's, these
    pioneers had found fresh land by moving southward into Maryland,
    Virginia and into Carolina. By the American Revolution, German
    settlers had taken the most fertile farmlands from Albany, New York to
    Charlotte, North Carolina. Their farms would serve as the breadbasket
    of George Washington's colonial army.
    With the end of a harvest, Philip sold his property in York in
    September 1766. He loaded his house and farm possessions onto a
    sturdy Conestoga wagon and headed south down the famous "Great
    Philadelphia Wagon Road." He was 25 years old, with a wife and five
    children under the age of eight. A Lutheran pastor G.D. Bernheim,
    writing in 1872, describes this German migration, "every able-bodied
    person on foot, women and children on bedding in the wagons, and
    cattle, sheep, and hogs driven before them; they travelled by easy
    stages, upon the roads of the picturesque Cumberland and Shenandoah
    Valleys, some crossing the Blue Ridge Mountains in some part of
    Virginia, until they reached the land of their hopes and promises."
    Philip Cansler, born on 2 May 1766, was then the youngest child, and
    he was but a baby in his mother Uly's arms on this long journey.
    Essentially, they continued moving south, staying just east of the
    Appalachian chain of Mountains, until they found unclaimed land which
    was to their liking.
    On 12 January 1767, Philip Gentzler purchased land in the valley of
    the South Fork in Old Mecklenberg County, North Carolina. He was one
    of the first white settlers to be west of the Catawba River, on a
    branch of the river called the South Fork. He was in the hill country
    of the North Carolina piedmont, 869 feet above sea level. Mountains
    were visable in every direction; Baker's Mountain to the northwest,
    Anderson's to the northeast, King's Mountain loomed to the southwest
    and there were three more mountains visable to the south. What new
    neighbors Philip had were also freshly arrived German pioneers from
    Pennsylvania. Lincoln Historian Alfred Nixon, writing in 1910, says
    that the newcomers, "found a wild, luxuriant with native flora, the
    habitat of the (Cherokee) red man and wild animals. There were herds
    of fleet-footed deer; there were clumsy brown bears and fierce wild
    cats and panthers; there were droves of buffalo, and countless beavers
    building their dams on the creeks." Because these wild animals preyed
    on their domestic animals, the early settlers "waged a relentless war
    on these animals." Philip Gentzler built a log cabin, probably
    attaching a stable or cow barn to it's side. Years latter would come a
    seperate barn, a smokehouse and a sawmill. He planted corn, grain,
    and vegtables. At one end of the house would be a large open
    fireplace with a Dutch oven built into the mortar. They cooked on
    iron utensils, ate from wooden plates and used pewter spoons. A split
    slab of wood, with the top surface smoothed with an adz, served as
    their table. They made their own furniture, clothing, and farm
    implements. Men wore hunting shirts, breeches, stockings, and
    moccasins. Tallow candles, made from bear grease or hog fat, provided
    light and filled the cabin with the strong odor of burning lard.
    Venison, bear, and pork were the preferred meats. Their pigs, running
    loose in the woods, eating acorns and roots, were brought home and
    slaughtered and butchered each December. Philip earned a reputation
    in the community for being "a frugal and sturdy citizen," and, with
    time, steadily increased his land holdings.
    1780 and 1781 were difficult years for the Gentzler's as the events of
    the American Revolution swirled around them. In June of 1780, at
    Ramsour's Mill, one mile to the north of the Gentzler farm, partisan
    Tory and Whig supporters squared off. The fighting left some 200 dead
    and wounded casualties littering the field. It was an important
    American victory, at a time when Whig fortunes were at a low point.
    In January of 1781, a British Army of 4,000 battle-weary troops under
    Lord Cornwallis camped for several days at Ramsour's Mill. Soldiers
    under Colonel Tarleton located their tents on and around the Gentzler
    farm. Philip probably lost all of his grain to the British
    commissary.
    Around 1785, the land between Philip's farm and that of Christian
    Reinhardt's was selected for the new county seat of Lincoln County.
    Philip evidently did not want to live next to the young town of
    Lincolnton, for, in that year, he gave this homestead to his son
    Philip Cansler. The elder Philip Gentzler, now 44 years old, moved
    five miles to the east and built a new farm on the banks of Leeper's
    Creek. Laban Miles, writing in 1915, reports that, "he built his
    house and a mill on the west bank of the creek on the slope of the
    hill facing the creek and adjoining the lands of the Rev. Jno Godfrey
    Arndt and in the neighborhood of the ancestral home of the Rudisills.
    His house was of the regulation style for those Indian days with a
    high basement wall of stone and the upper house built of very large
    hewed logs." Next to the swiftly moving Leeper's Creek, the stone
    foundation and walls of the mill still remain today. The creek is
    about 25 feet across. Water powered mills were essential on the
    frontier as they provided pioneers, like Philip Gentzler, with flour
    and meal by grinding grain and corn between two millstones. The pond
    that the mill produced was also a natural site for fishing.
    In 1804, Philip Gentzler died on his farm at Leeper's Creek. He was
    buried on the crest of the hill behind his house. His grave stone is
    inscribed in German. The english translation is, "Here lies a father
    of many children, a friend of men and a Christian; who through the
    Cross is now perfect; he is well known to us; he served his people and
    (land) country; his name is with all honor the (our) father, Philip W.
    Genseler, who died Oct. 7, 1804, aged 63 years." His wife Uly was
    buried next to him, under a rough unlettered stone. Also buried there
    is his son George Cansler and the wife of George. Today, these graves
    are no longer marked. They are situated in the side yard of Mr.
    Edward Smith, the cattle farmer who currently owns this property.
    2 3 1
  • Birth: 4 SEP 1739 in Dotzheim, Hessen-Nassau, Germany
  • Note:
    # ID: I569527713
    # Name: Phillpp Wilhelm, Sr GENTZLER
    # Given Name: Phillpp Wilhelm, Sr
    # Surname: Gentzler
    # Sex: M
    # Birth: 4 Sep 1739 in Dotzheim, Hessen-Nassau, Germany 1
    # Death: 7 Oct 1804 in Leepers Creek, Lincoln Co, North Carolina
    # Immigration: 24 Aug 1749 Rotterdam to Philadelphia 1
    # Emigration: Sep 1766 Great Philadelphia Wagon Road 1
    # Will: 25 May 1801 Lincoln Co, North Carolina
    # Probate: Apr 1805 Lincoln Co Court, North Carolina 1
    # Baptism: 5 Sep 1739 Dotzheim, Lutherin, Germany

    Father: Johann Conradt, Sr GENTZLER b: Abt 1705 in Sonnenberg, Hessen-N assau, Germany
    Mother: Maria Catharina LOTZ b: Abt 1708 in Germany

    Marriage 1 Maria Julianna "Uly" WINTERMER b: 23 Aug 1741 in Schierstein , Kreis Wiesbaden, Germany

    * Married: Abt 1758 in York Co, Pennsylvania 1

    Children

    1. +Anna Gertrout "Catherine" CANSLER b: Abt 1758 in York Co, P ennsylvania
    2. +Anna Maria Margaretha CANSLER b: 4 Sep 1760 in York Co, P ennsylvania
    3. Maria Catherine "Katie" CANSLER b: 21 Jul 1762 in York Co, Pennsy lvania
    4. +John CANSLER b: 1 Apr 1764 in York Co, Pennsylvania
    5. +Phillip Wilhelm, Jr CANSLER b: 2 May 1766 in York Co, Pen nsylvania
    6. +George CANSLER b: 31 Jan 1770 in Lincoln Co, North Caroli na
    7. Elizabeth CANSLER b: Abt 1772 in Lincoln Co, North Carolina
    8. +Mary "Marlena" CANSLER b: Abt 1772 in Lincoln Co, North C arolina
    9. +Barbara CANSLER b: Abt 1774 in Lincoln Co, North Carolina
    10. +Conrad W "Coonie" CANSLER b: Abt 1780 in Lincoln Co, Nort h Carolina


    Sources:

    1. Author: William Clifford Roberts, Jr
    Title: The Cansler Family in America
    Publication: Copyright 2001
    Note:
    Gateway Press
    Repository:

    source page:
    http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2878265&id=I56952771 3

    db:
    John Anderson (janderson@sbcglobal.net)

    added:
    02/06/2005
    ==========
    4 2 3 1
  • Birth: 4 SEP 1739 in Dotzheim, Germany 2 3 1
  • Baptism: 5 SEP 1739 Dotzheim Lutheran, Germany 4 2 3 1
  • Immigration: 24 AUG 1749 Rotterdam to Philadelphia 2 3 1
  • NATU: 1763
  • _SDATE: 1 JUL 1763 Province of Pennsylvania 5 2 3 1
  • Event: Deed 28 AUG 1766 York County, PA 6 2 3 1
  • Emigration: SEP 1766
  • _SDATE: 15 SEP 1766 Great Philadelphia Wagon Road 7 2 3 1
  • Event: Deed 12 JAN 1767 South Fork, Catawba River, NC 8 2 3 1
  • Event: Deed 10 DEC 1779 South Fork River, Lincoln County, NC 9 2 3 1
  • Event: War 20 JUN 1780 Battle of Ramsour's Mill 10 2 3 1
  • Event: Anecdote 14 DEC 1785 Founding of Lincolnton, NC 11 2 3 1
  • Event: Deed 24 JAN 1795 South Fork, Lincoln County, NC 12 2 3 1
  • Will: 25 MAY 1801 Lincoln County, North Carolina 13 2 3 1
  • Death: 7 OCT 1804 in Leepers Creek, Lincoln, North Carolina 2 3 1
  • Probate: APR 1805
  • _SDATE: 15 APR 1805 Lincoln County Court, North Carolina 12 2 3 1



    Father: Johann Conradt "Joseph Conrad" - [Cansler] GENTZLER b: ABT 1713 in Hesse, Darmstadt, Germany
    Mother: Maria Catharina "Catherine" LOTZ b: ABT 1708 in Germany

    Father: Johann Conradt "Joseph Conrad" - [Cansler] GENTZLER b: ABT 1713 in Hesse, Darmstadt, Germany
    Mother: Maria Catherine LOTZ b: ABT 1708 in Germany

    Marriage 1 Juliana DEFENBAUGH b: 1744

      Marriage 2 (Ann) Maria Juliana "Uly" WINTERMEYER b: 23 AUG 1741 in Schierstein, Hessen-Nassau, Germany
      • Note:
        Early family historians, including Laban Miles Hoffman, who wrote
        [UL::UL]Our Kin[UL::UL] in 1915, have identified Philip's wife as
        Juliana "Uly" Devepaugh. Stella Cansler, in her research done in the
        1980's, has located the will of Philip Wintermyer, dated 15 October
        1774 and probated in York County 6 January 1775. Wintermyer and his
        family were fellow passengers on the [UL::UL]Elliott[UL::UL] with
        Johann Conradt Gentzler and his family. Philip Windermier/Wintermyer
        named his wife Gerthrout, and daughter "Juliana, who is intermarried
        with Philip Gentzler."
      • Married: ABT 1758 in St. Andrew, Philadelphia, York County, Pennsylvania
      • Note:
        Family Group Record FamilySearch? Ancestral File v4.19
        Download GEDCOM
        Husband's Name
        Philip W. CANSLER (AFN:2VKB-F7) Pedigree
        Born: 1741 Place: Germany
        Died: 7 Oct 1804 Place: Lincolnton, Lincoln, Nc
        Buried: Place: Family Home, Leeper's Creek, Lincoln Co., Nc
        Married: Place:
        Father: Joseph Conrad GENTZLER (AFN:LLTL-4L) Family
        Mother: Maria Catherine (AFN:LLTL-5R)
        Wife's Name
        Uly DEVENPAUGH (AFN:2VKB-GD) Pedigree
        Born: 1744 Place: Germany
        Died: Place: Lincolnton, Lincoln, Nc
        Married: Place:
        Father:
        Mother:
        Children
        1. Sex Name
        F Catherine CANSLER (AFN:2VKB-T9) Pedigree
        Born: 1762 Place: Pa
        2. Sex Name
        F Katie CANSLER (AFN:2VKB-VG) Pedigree
        Born: 1764 Place: Pa
        3. Sex Name
        F Mary CANSLER (AFN:2VKB-XS) Pedigree
        Born: 1767 Place: Lincolnton, Lincoln, Nc
        4. Sex Name
        F Elizabeth CANSLER (AFN:2VKB-Z0) Pedigree
        Born: 1769 Place: Lincolnton, Lincoln, Nc
        5. Sex Name
        F Barbara CANSLER (AFN:2VKC-19) Pedigree
        Born: 1772 Place: Lincolnton, Lincoln, Nc
        Died: Abt 1843 Place:
        6. Sex Name
        M Conrade CANSLER (AFN:2VKC-2G) Pedigree
        Born: 1774 Place: Lincolnton, Lincoln, Nc
        Died: 1848 Place:
        7. Sex Name
        M Conrad W. CANSLER (AFN:LLTL-28) Pedigree
        Born: 1780/1781 Place: Lincoln Co., Nc
        Died: 1846 Place: Monroe Co., Tn
        8. Sex Name
        M George CANSLER (AFN:2VKC-04) Pedigree
        Born: 31 Jan 1770 Place: Lincolnton, Lincoln, Nc
        Died: 2 Oct 1830 Place: , Lincoln, Nc
        Buried: Place: Old Cansler Home, Leepers Creek, Lincoln Co., Nc
        9. Sex Name
        F Margaret CANSLER (AFN:2VKB-D2) Pedigree
        Born: 31 Oct 1759 Place: Pa
        Died: 2 May 1833 Place: Nc
        10. Sex Name
        M Philip CANSLER (AFN:2VKB-WM) Pedigree
        Born: 31 Oct 1765 Place: York Co., Pa
        Died: 1840 Place: Lincoln Co., Tn
        Buried: 1840 Place:
        11. Sex Name
        M John CANSLER (AFN:2VKB-S4) Pedigree
        Born: 1 Apr 1764 Place: , York, Pa
        Died: 28 Sep 1828 Place: , Rutherford, Nc
        12. Sex Name
        F Maria Catherine CANSLER (AFN:LLTL-0W) Pedigree
        Born: 21 Jul 1762 Place: Lincolnton, York, Pa
        Christened: Place: Christ Lutheran, Church, York
        The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

        © 1999-2005 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. Englis h approval: 3/1999
        Use of this site constitutes your acceptance of these Conditions of Use ( last updated:
        3/22/1999). Privacy Policy (last updated: 11/24/2004). 28

        source site:
        http://www.familysearch.org v.2.5.0

        added:
        12oct2005
        ===============
        Adkins
        Entries: 8537 Updated: 2005-06-06 09:55:19 UTC (Mon) Contact: Sha ryn Young
        Index | Descendancy | Register | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
        # ID: I72977638
        # Name: Phillip W. Sr. CANSLER
        # Given Name: Phillip W. Sr.
        # Surname: Cansler
        # Sex: M
        # Note:

        http://www.wcpetty.net/Genealogy/pedigree/d0007/g0000025.html#I1201


        RELIGION: Lutheran
        BIRTH: ABT. 1741, Germany
        DEATH: 7 Oct 1804, Leeper's Creek, Lincoln County, North Carolina
        BURIAL: Cansler Family Private Cemetery located on Leepers Creek, L incoln
        County, n.C..
        IMMIGRATION: 24 Aug 1749, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
        EVENT: Place Lived (3) : BEF. 1767, York County, Pennsylvania
        EVENT: Place Lived (4) : 12 Jan 1767, South Fork, Catawba River,
        Mecklenberg County, North Carolina
        EVENT: Place Lived (6) : Tryon County, North Carolina
        EVENT: Place Lived (6) : Lincoln County, North Carolina
        EVENT: Place Lived (1) : BEF. 1749, Germany
        WILL: 25 May 1801, Lincoln County, North Carolina
        EVENT: Will Probate : Apr 1805, Lincoln County, North Carolina
        EVENT: Occupation (1) : Farmer
        Father: Johann Conradt GENTZLER , Sr.
        Mother: Maria Catherine UNKNOWN
        Family 1 : Juliana WINTERMEYER
        MARRIAGE: ABT. 1758, York County, Pennsylvania
        +Anna Margaret CANSLER
        +Anna Gertrout CANSLER
        +Maria Catherine CANSLER
        +John CANSLER
        +Philip W. CANSLER , Jr.
        +George M. CANSLER
        Elizabeth CANSLER
        Mary Marlena CANSLER
        Barbara CANSLER
        +Conrad W. CANSLER
        -------------------------------------



        Marriage 1 Juliana WINTERMEYER

        Children

        1. Has Children Anna Gertrout Catherine Diffenbach CANSLER b: 1760 i n York Co, PA

        source:
        http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:1621750&id= I72977638

        added:
        23dec2005
        2 1
      • Married: ABT 1759 in York County, PA
      • Note:
        # ID: I544275723
        # Name: Phillip W. GENTZLER
        # Given Name: Phillip W.
        # Surname: Gentzler
        # Sex: M
        # Birth: Abt 1741 in Germany 1 2
        # Death: 7 Oct 1804 in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, NC 1 2
        # Burial: Lincolnton, Lincoln County, NC 1 2
        # Note:

        REFN: 65
        [Spottswood.GED]
        !The book, THE ANNALS OF LINCOLN COUNTY, tells
        about the Cansler family among others. On page
        65 we read: "Philip W. Cansler the pioneer was
        one of the early settlers west of the Catawba
        River. The record shows that he owned land
        near High Shoals in 1767. Later he lived one-
        half mile south of Lincoln Court House where he
        had large land interests and was a frugal and
        sturdy citizen...He later moved to Leeper's
        Creek, east of Lincolnton, and died there in
        1804, and his body was buried in a graveyard
        (now neglected) near his Leeper's Creek home.
        His marble gravestone bears a German inscription,
        which translated would read: 'Here rests a father
        of many children, a friend of men and a Christian,
        who through the cross is now perfect. He is well
        known to us; he served his people and his country.
        His name is with all honor the (our) father,
        Philip W. Cansler.'" The Gentzler name became
        Americanized after living in North Carolina and
        became Cansler.



        Father: Johann Conradt GENTZLER b: Abt 1713 in Hesse, Darmstadt, German y
        Mother: Maria CATHERINE b: Abt 1717

        Marriage 1 Julianna "Uly" WINTERMEYER b: Abt 1740 in Germany

        * Married: Abt 1759 1 2
        * Note: REFN36374

        Children

        1. Anna Margaret GENTZLER b: 24 Sep 1760 in York County, PA
        2. Maria Catherine GENTZLER b: 21 Jul 1762 in York County, PA
        3. Katie GENTZLER b: Abt 1764 in PA
        4. John GENTZLER b: 1 Apr 1764 in York County, PA
        5. Philip CANSLER b: 31 Oct 1765 in PA
        6. Mary CANSLER b: Abt 1767 in Lincolnton, Tryon County, NC
        7. Elizabeth CANSLER b: Abt 1769 in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, NC
        8. George M. CANSLER b: 31 Jan 1770 in of Lincolnton, Tryon County, N C
        9. Barbara CANSLER b: Abt 1772 in Lincolnton, Tryon County, NC
        10. Conrad W. CANSLER b: Abt 1774 in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, NC


        Sources:

        1. Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc.
        Title: World Family Tree Vol. 7, Ed. 1
        Publication: Release date: October 17, 1996
        Note:
        Customer pedigree.
        Repository:
        2. Title: Spottswood.GED
        Repository:

        source page:
        http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2649127&id= I544275723

        db:
        Philip Taylor (philiptaylor@raymondjames.com)

        added:
        02/06/2005
        2 3 1
      Children
      1. Has Children Catherine Anna Gertrout\Maria Catherine "Katie" CANSLER b: ABT 1758 in York County, PA
      2. Has Children John CANSLER b: 1 APR 1764 in St. Andrew, Philadelphia, York County, Pennsylvania
      3. Has No Children Elizabeth CANSLER b: ABT 1772 in Lincoln, North Carolina
      4. Has Children Conrad W. CANSLER b: ABT 1780 in Lincoln, North Carolina
      5. Has Children Anna Margaret - Maria CANSLER b: 4 SEP 1760 in York County, PA
      6. Has Children Phillip Wilhelm (junior) CANSLER b: 2 MAY 1766 in St. Andrew, Philadelphia, York County, Pennsylvania c: 1783 in Warlick Settlement, Lincoln, North Carolina
      7. Has Children George M. CANSLER b: 31 JAN 1770 in Lincoln, North Carolina
      8. Has Children Mary "Marlena" CANSLER b: ABT 1772 in Lincoln, North Carolina
      9. Has No Children Barbara CANSLER b: ABT 1774 in Lincoln County, NC

      Sources:
      1. Abbrev: GEDCOM file imported on 14 Mar 2014 - CAA's GEDCOM backup - hard drive
        Title: GEDCOM file submitted by Cathy Abernathy - GEDCOM archive from harddriv e - recovered file, weavercat@gmail.com. Created on 12 MAR 2014. Import ed on 14 Mar 2014.
      2. Abbrev: GEDCOM file imported on 23 Sep 2009 - CAA's GEDCOM Backup file - hard drive
        Title: GEDCOM file submitted by Cathy Ann Abernathygmail.com. Created on 17 AU G 2009. Imported on 23 Sep 2009.
      3. Abbrev: GEDCOM file imported on 30 Apr 2005
        Title: GEDCOM file. Created on 30 APR 2005. Imported on 30 Apr 2005.
      4. Abbrev: Research of Richard K. Konkel, York, Pennsylvania
        Title: Research of Richard K. Konkel, York, Pennsylvania
        (richardkonkel@yahoo.com).
        (richardkonkel@yahoo.com).
        (richardkonkel@yahoo.com).
        (richardkonkel@yahoo.com).
      5. Abbrev: Persons Naturalized in the Province of Pennsylvani
        Title: Persons Naturalized in the Province of Pennsylvania, 1740-1773.,
        reprinted 1967, Baltimore, by Genealogical Publishing Co., orginally
        published 1876 in Pennsylvania Archives.
        reprinted 1967, Baltimore, by Genealogical Publishing Co., orginally
        published 1876 in Pennsylvania Archives.
        reprinted 1967, Baltimore, by Genealogical Publishing Co., orginally
        published 1876 in Pennsylvania Archives.
        reprinted 1967, Baltimore, by Genealogical Publishing Co., orginally
        published 1876 in Pennsylvania Archives.
      6. Abbrev: Ralph W. Cansler family group sheet suppled Septe
        Title: Ralph W. Cansler family group sheet suppled September 1997 by Ralph W. C ansler 309 Springwood Drive, Aiken, SC 29803ansler 309 Springwood Drive , Aiken, SC 29803ansler 309 Springwood Drive, Aiken, SC 29803ansler 309 S pringwood Drive, Aiken, SC 29803.
      7. Abbrev: The Great Wagon Road; from Philadelphia To the Sou
        Title: Parke Rouse, Jr., The Great Wagon Road; from Philadelphia To the South N ew York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1973(Rowan County Public Library)ew Y ork: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1973(Rowan County Public Library)ew York : McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1973(Rowan County Public Library).
      8. Abbrev: Mecklenburg County, North Carolina Deed Abstracts,
        Title: Mecklenburg County, North Carolina Deed Abstracts, 1763-1779, by Brent
        H. Holcomb, 1979, Southern Historical Press, Easley, SC (Lincolnton
        Public Library) Page 16
        H. Holcomb, 1979, Southern Historical Press, Easley, SC (Lincolnton
        Public Library) Page 16
        H. Holcomb, 1979, Southern Historical Press, Easley, SC (Lincolnton
        Public Library) Page 16
        H. Holcomb, 1979, Southern Historical Press, Easley, SC (Lincolnton
        Public Library) Page 16.
      9. Abbrev: Deedbook 2, page 534. A copy is in the Carpenter
        Title: Deedbook 2, page 534. A copy is in the Carpenter File, Rowan County
        Public Library.
        Public Library.
        Public Library.
        Public Library.
      10. Abbrev: The History of Lincoln County
        Title: Alfred Nixon, The History of Lincoln County January 1910 reprinted, Lin coln County Historical Association, September 1978. (Rowan County Publi c Library)coln County Historical Association, September 1978. (Rowan Co unty Public Library)ncoln County Historical Association, September 1978 . (Rowan County Public Library).
      11. Abbrev: Annals of Lincoln County, North Carolina
        Title: William L. Sherill, Annals of Lincoln County, North Carolina (1937 repr inted, Heritage Books, Inc., Bowie, Maryland, 1998)inted, Heritage Book s, Inc., Bowie, Maryland, 1998)inted, Heritage Books, Inc., Bowie, Mary land, 1998.
      12. Abbrev: Civil Action Papers 1771-1806 of the Court of Plea
        Title: Anne Williams McAllister & Kathy Gunter Sullivan, comp, Civil Action Pa pers 1771-1806 of the Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions, Lincoln County , North Carolina (Rowan Public Library)pers 1771-1806 of the Court of P leas & Quarter Sessions, Lincoln County, North Carolina (Rowan Public L ibrary)pers 1771-1806 of the Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions, Lincoln C ounty, North Carolinapers 1771-1806 of the Court of Pleas & Quarter Ses sions, Lincoln County, North Carolina. Rowan Public Library.
      13. Abbrev: Our Kin; Being a History of the Hoffman, Rhyne, Co
        Title: Laban Miles Hoffman, Our Kin; Being a History of the Hoffman, Rhyne, Co stner, Rudisill, Best, Hovis, Hoyle, Wills, Shetley, Jenkins, Holland, H ambright, Gaston, Withers, C (Charlotte: Queen City Publishing, 1915)st ner, Rudisill, Best, Hovis, Hoyle, Wills, Shetley, Jenkins, Holland, Ha mbright, Gaston, Withers, C (Charlotte: Queen City Publishing, 1915)stn er, Rudisill, Best, Hovis, Hoyle, Wills, Shetley, Jenkins, Holland, Ham bright, Gaston, Withers, Cstner, Rudisill, Best, Hovis, Hoyle, Wills, S hetley, Jenkins, Holland, Hambright, Gaston, Withers, C. Charlotte: Que en City Publishing, 1915.
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