Monroe-Adams Family

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  • ID: I2986
  • Name: William Munroe
  • Given Name: William
  • Surname: Munroe
  • Prefix: Col. 1 2 3
  • Name: Munro
  • Given Name:
  • Surname: Munro 4
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 28 Oct 1742 in Lexington, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts, USA 5 3
  • Death: 30 Oct 1827 in Lexington, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts, USA
  • Event: Military Service 1775-1777 Lexington, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts, USA
  • Note:
    William served as Orderly-Sergeant in Captain Parker's company of Minutemen at the battle of Lexington on 19 Apr 1775. He commanded the guard posted at the house of the Rev. Jonas Clarke on the preceding night to protect John Hancock and Samuel Adams, upon whose heads a price had been set by the British.

    On 19 Apr 1775, he paraded the seventy Minutemen on Lexington Common in front of the eight hundred British troops sent out under Major Pitcairn.

    As a Lieutenant, he participated in the capture General Burgoyne in 1777.

    He was a Colonel of Militia and took part in the march to Springfield during Shays' Rebellion.
    6 4
  • Occupation: Lexington, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts, USA
  • Note:
    William was a prominent citizen of Lexington, a Selectman for nine years and served as a representative in the General Court of Massachusetts for two years. The General Court was the supreme legislative body of the State.

    He was the proprietor of the famous "Munro Tavern" where the British soldiers regaled themselves and committed many outrages on 19 Apr 1775, and where General George Washington dined in 1789 when he visited the first battlefield of the American Revolution.
    6
  • Event: Alt. Death 1825 2
  • _UID: 5259EDEF3D7C4C0B88B99B62AEF520F28A9F
  • Change Date: 15 Jun 2008 at 21:28
  • Note:
    Here follows the deposition of William Munroe made 7 March 1825:

    I, William Munroe, of Lexington, on oath do testify, that I acted as orderly sergeant in the company commanded by Captain Parker, on the 19th of April, 1775; that early in the evening of the 18th of the same April, I was informed by Solomon Brown, who had just returned from Boston, that he had seen nine British officers on the road, traveling leisurely, sometimes before and sometimes behind him; that he had discovered, by the occasional blowing aside of their top coats that they were armed. On learning this, I supposed they had some design upon Hancock and Adams, who were then at the house of the Reverend Mr. Clarke, and immediately assembled a guard of eight men, with their arms to guard the house. About midnight, Colonel Paul Revere rode up the road and requested admittance. I told him that the family had just retired, and had requested, that they might not be disturbed by any noise about the house. "Noise!" said he, "you'll have noise enough before long. The regulars are coming out." We then permitted him to pass. Soon after, Mr. Lincoln came. These gentlemen came different routes, Revere came over the ferry to Charlestown, and Lincoln over the neck through Roxbury; and both brought letters from Dr. Warren in Boston to Hancock and Adams, stating that a large body of British troops had left Boston, and were on their march to Lexington. On this, it was thought advisable, that Hancock and Adams should withdraw to some distant part of the town. To this Hancock consented with great reluctance, and said, as he went off. "If I had my musket, I would never turn my back upon these troops." I however conducted them to the north part of town, and then returned to the meeting-house, where I arrived at about two o'clock on the morning of the 19th. On the arrival of Colonel Paul Revere, the alarm had been given, and, on my return, I found Captain Parker and his militia company paraded on the common, a little in the rear of the meeting-house. About this time, one of our messengers, who had been sent toward Cambridge to get information of the movement of the regulars, returned and reported, that he could not learn, that there were any troops on the road from Boston to Lexington, which raised some doubt as to their coming, and Captain Parker dismissed his company, with orders to assemble again at the beat of the drum. Between day-light and sun-rise Captain Thaddeus Bowman rode up and informed, that the regulars were near. The drum was then ordered to be beat, and I was commanded by Captain Parker to parade the company, which I accordingly did, in two ranks, a few rods northerly of the meeting-house.

    When the British troops had arrived within about a hundred rods of the meeting-house, as I was afterwards told by a prisoner, which we took, "they heard our drum, and supposing it to be a challenge, they were ordered to load their muskets, and to move at double quick time." They came up almost upon a run. Colonel Smith and Major Pitcairn rode up some rods in advance of their troops, and within a few rods of our company, and exclaimed, "Lay down your arms, you rebels, and disperse!" and immediately fired his pistol. Pitcairn then advanced with his troops, and finding we did not disperse, they being within four rods of us, he brought his sword down with great force, and said to his men, "Fire, damn you, fire!" The front platoon, consisting of eight or nine, then fired, without killing or wounding any of our men. They immediately gave a second fire, when our company began to retreat, and as I left that field, I saw a person firing at the British troops from Buckman's back door, which was near our left, where I was parading the men when I retreated. I was afterward told, of the truth of which I have no doubt, that same person after firing from the back door, went to the front of Buckman's house, and fired there. How many of our company fired before they retreated, I can not say; but I am confident some of them did. When the British troops came up, I saw Jonas Parker standing in the ranks, with his balls and flints in his hat, on the ground, between his feet, and heard him declare, that he would never run. He was shot down at the second fire of the British, and, when I left, I saw him struggling on the ground, attempting to load his gun, which I have no doubt he had once discharged at the British. As he lay on the ground, they ran him through with the bayonet. In the course of the day, I was on the ground where the British troops were when they first heard our drum beat, which was one hundred rods below the meeting-house, and saw the ends of a large number, I should judge two hundred, of cartridges which they had dropped, when they charged their pieces. About noon I was at the north part of the town, at the house Mr. Simmonds, where I saw the late Colonel Baldwin, who informed me, that he had the custody of some prisoners, that had been put under his charge, and requested to know of me what should be done with them. I gave my opinion, that they should be sent to that part of Woburn, now Burlington, or to Chelmsford. On the return of the British troops from Concord, they stopped at my tavern house in Lexington, and dressed their wounds. I had left my house in care of a lame man, by the name of Raymond, who supplied them with whatever the house afforded, and afterwards, when he was leaving the house, he was shot by the regulars, and found dead within a few rods of the house.
    (signed) William Munroe

    The services that William performed at the opening of the Revolution, were followed up by services during the progress of the war. He was a lieutenant in the northern army at the capture of Burgoyne, in 1777. He was a prominent citizen, and filled important town offices. For nine years he was a selectman, and represented the town two years. He marched towards Springfield during Shay's Rebellion and was a Colonel in the militia. He kept the public house, long known as the Munroe Tavern. Here the British regaled themselves, and committed many outrages on the 19th of April; here they shot down John Raymond who was leaving the house. In 1789, George Washington dined in the Munroe Tavern, on his visit to Lexington's battle field of Revolution.

    William's second wife, whose name was either Mary or Polly and who was from Westford, Massachusetts, was a widow whose first husband was killed at the battle of Monmouth by the bursting of a cannon.

    The following is from the "Abstract of Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Masons in Massachusetts - 1920" - p. 340

    ------------------------------------------------------

    Tradition tells us through our late Brother Albert W. Bryant, that the first assembly of Freemasons in Lexington was on the top of the hill in the rear of Munroe Tavern. In 1797 ten Masons gathered at Munroe Tavern and signed a petition to the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts for a Charter. Dispensation was granted December 12, 1797, for the Institution of Hiram Lodge. Colonel William Munroe, well known as the stalwart orderly of Captain Parker's Minute-Men, was the first Master and served, in all, six years. This Lodge met at Munroe Tavern for thirty-three years, during which time one hundred and ninety members were recorded, of which number one hundred and fifty were Raised in the Lodge. The Lodge was dormant for several years during the anti-Masonic period and finally moved to West Cambridge, now Arlington, in 1843.

    -----------------------------------------------------

    William died 30 Oct 1827 (Hudson's Hist. of Lexington) or May 1827/28 (Lexington, Vital Records).

    Compiled and edited by Allen Alger, Genealogist, Clan Munro Association, USA - email: Alger@alum.mit.edu
    7



    Father: William Munroe b: 19 Dec 1703 in Lexington, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts, USA
    Mother: Sarah Mason b: 17 Jun 1714

    Marriage 1 Anna Smith b: 17 Jun 1742
    • Married: 31 Mar 1743 8
    • Change Date: 20 Jan 2009
    Children
    1. Has Children William Munroe b: 28 May 1768 in Lexington, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts, USA
    2. Has No Children Anna Munroe b: 9 May 1771 in Lexington, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts, USA
    3. Has No Children Sarah Munroe b: 21 Oct 1773 in Lexington, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts, USA
    4. Has No Children Lucinda Munroe b: 9 Apr 1776 in Lexington, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts, USA
    5. Has Children Jonas Munroe b: 11 Jun 1778 in Lexington, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts, USA
    6. Has Children Edmund Munroe b: 29 Oct 1780 in Lexington, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts, USA

    Marriage 2 Mary b: Abt 1744
    • Married:
    • Change Date: 20 Jan 2009

    Sources:
    1. Media: Book
      Abbrev: History of the Munros of Fowlis
      Title: History of the Munros of Fowlis
      Author: Alexander Mackenzie, M.J.L.
      Publication: Published in Inverness, Scotland by A & W Mackenzie (1898)
      Page: p. 574, 579
    2. Media: File
      Abbrev: Clan Munro files - Munroe, Charles C., III
      Title: Clan Munro files - Munroe, Charles C., III
      Author: Charles C. Munroe, III
      Page: Historical & Biographical Sketch of the Monroe (Munroe) an d Monro (Munro) Family - p. 5
    3. Media: Book
      Abbrev: Lexington Munroes
      Title: History and Genealogy of the Lexington, Massachusetts Munroes, 2nd edition
      Author: Richard S. Munroe
      Publication: privately published in Florence, Massachusetts (1986)
      Page: p. 19
    4. Media: File
      Abbrev: Clan Munro files - Proctor, Joseph Rich, Jr.
      Title: Clan Munro files - Proctor, Joseph Rich, Jr.
      Author: Joseph Rich Proctor, Jr.
      Page: Descendants of William Munro - p. 2
    5. Media: Book
      Abbrev: History of the Munros of Fowlis
      Title: History of the Munros of Fowlis
      Author: Alexander Mackenzie, M.J.L.
      Publication: Published in Inverness, Scotland by A & W Mackenzie (1898)
      Page: p. 574
    6. Media: Book
      Abbrev: History of the Munros of Fowlis
      Title: History of the Munros of Fowlis
      Author: Alexander Mackenzie, M.J.L.
      Publication: Published in Inverness, Scotland by A & W Mackenzie (1898)
      Page: p. 574-575
    7. Media: File
      Abbrev: Clan Munro files - Moore, Paul Arlon
      Title: Clan Munro files - Moore, Paul Arlon
      Author: Paul Arlon Moore
      Page: Abstract of Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Masons in Mas sachusetts - 1920 - p. 340
    8. Media: Book
      Abbrev: History of the Munros of Fowlis
      Title: History of the Munros of Fowlis
      Author: Alexander Mackenzie, M.J.L.
      Publication: Published in Inverness, Scotland by A & W Mackenzie (1898)
      Page: p. 575
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