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  • ID: I98415
  • Name: Ezra (Azariah) ben Seraiah ben Azariah IV
  • Surname: Seraiah ben Azariah IV
  • Given Name: Ezra (Azariah) ben
  • Prefix: Prophet-Scribe
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: ABT 0500 BC 1
  • Christening: 0459 BC/0458 2
  • Death: DECEASED 3
  • _UID: 3C041A469C3FD141B1C88283E1D11B7B53B1
  • _PRIMARY: Y
  • PEDI: foster
  • PEDI: foster 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  • Change Date: 8 Apr 2014 at 01:00:00



    Father: Descendents of High Priest Seraiah ben Azariah IV b: ABT 0575 BC in Jerusalem, Israel

    Father: Associates of Prophet Scribe Baruch ben Neriah b: ABT 0625 BC

    Father: Associates of Governor Zerubbabel ben Pedaiah b: ABT 0500 BC in Babylon

    Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown
      Children
      1. Has No Children Associates of Prophet Scribe Ezra ben Seraiah foster b: ABT 0500 BC
      2. Has No Children AKA Prophet-Scribe (Ezra) Azariah ben Seraiah foster b: ABT 0500 BC
      3. Has No Children AKA Prophet Scribe (Ezra) Uzair ibn Seraiah foster b: ABT 0500 BC
      4. Has No Children AKA Prophet Scribe (Ezra) Esdras ben Saraias foster b: ABT 0500 BC

      Sources:
      1. Title: Book of Ezra
        Note: Ezra 7:1-5
        1...in the reign of Artaxerxes king of Persia, Ezra the son of Seraiah I, the son of Azaria h IV, the son of Hilkiah, The son of Shallum [Meshullam], [the son of Zadok II, the son of Ah itub III, the son of Amariah II, the son of Azariah III, the son of Johanan, the son of Aza riah II, the son of Ahimaaz,] the son of Zadok I, the son of Ahitub II,
      2. Title: International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
        Publication:
        Page: EZRA
        Note:
        In the 7th year of Artaxerxes I (459-458 BC) Ezra requested permission of the king to go up t o Jerusalem; for "Ezra had set his heart to seek the law of Yahweh, and to do it, and to teac h in Israel statutes and ordinances." Artaxerxes granted his request, and gave him a letter p ermitting as many of the people of Israel and of the priests and Levites as so desired to acc ompany him to Jerusalem, and commissioning him to inquire concerning Judah and Jerusalem, an d to carry a gift of money from the king and his counselors, and all the money to be found i n the province of Babylon, and the freewill offerings of the people and priests, with which t o buy offerings to offer upon the altar of the house of God which was in Jerusalem.
      3. Title: Book of the Bee (Psuedepigraphal)
        Author: Earnest A. Wallis Budge, M.A., Translator
        Publication: http://www.sacred-texts.com/chr/bb/
        Note: CHAPTER XXXII4. p. 69
        OF THE DEATH OF THE PROPHETS; HOW THEY DlED, AND (WHERE) EACH ONE OF THEM WAS BURIED5.

        Ezra the scribe was from the country of Sābthā2, and of the tribe of Judah. This (prophet ) brought back the people, and died in peace in his own land.

        2 Epiphanius, ??? ???? ??????? {Greek: ek ghs Sunbašį}.
        (http://www.sacred-texts.com/chr/bb/bb32.htm)
      4. Title: International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
        Publication:
        Note: EZRA
        (3) The distinguished priest who is the hero of the Book of Ezra and co-worker with Nehemiah.

        The genealogy of Ezra is given in Ezra 7:1-6, where it appears that he was the son of Seraiah , the son of Azariah, the son of Hilkiah, the son of Shallum, the son of Ahitub, the son of A mariah, the son of Azariah, the son of Meraioth, the son of Zerahiah, the son of Uzzi, the so n of Bukki, the son of Abishua, the son of Phinehas, the son of Eleazar, the son of Aaron, th e high priest. Since Seraiah, according to the Book of Kings, was killed by Nebuchadrezzar a t Riblah (2 Kings 25:18-21), and since he was the father of Jehozadak, the high priest who wa s carried into captivity by Nebuchadrezzar (1 Chronicles 6:14,15; Hebrews 5:14), etc. in 58 8 BC, and since the return under Ezra took place in 458 BC, the word "son" must be used in Ez ra 7:2 in the sense of descendant. Since, moreover, Joshua, or Jeshua, the high priest, who r eturned from Babylon with Zerubbabel, was the son of Jehozadak and the grandson of Seraiah, E zra was probably the great-grandson or great-great-grandson of Seraiah. Inasmuch as Jehozada k is never mentioned as one of his forefathers, Ezra was probably not descended from Jehozada k, but from a younger brother. He would thus not be a high priest, though he was of high-prie stly descent as far as Seraiah. For the sake of shortening the list of names, six names are o mitted in Ezra 7:2-7 between Azariah and Meraioth, and one between Shallum and Ahitub from th e corresponding list found in 1 Chronicles 6:4-14 (Hebrew 5:30-40).


        EZRA
        ez'-ra (Aramaic or Chaldee, `ezra', "help"; a hypocoristicon, or shortened form of Azariah, " Yahweh has helped." The Hebrew spells the name `ezrah, as in 1 Chronicles 4:17, or uses the A ramaic spelling of the name, as in Ezra 7:1. The Greek form is Esdras):
        (1) A priest who returned with Zerubbabel (RIN 374) from Babylon (Nehemiah 12:1). In Nehemia h 10:2, Azariah, the full form of the name, is found.
      5. Title: LDS Bible Dictionary
        Note: BD EZRA
        A famous priest and scribe who brought back part of the exiles from captivity (Ezra 7 - 10; N eh. 8; Neh. 12). The object of his mission was ?to teach in Israel statutes and judgments.? I n 458 B.C. he obtained from Artaxerxes an important edict (Ezra 7: 12-26) allowing him to tak e to Jerusalem any Jewish exiles who cared to go, along with offerings for the temple with wh ich he was entrusted, and giving to the Jews various rights and privileges. He was also direc ted to appoint magistrates and judges. On arriving in Jerusalem his first reform was to caus e the Jews to separate from their foreign wives, and a list is given of those who had offende d in this way (Ezra 10). The later history of Ezra is found in the book of Nehemiah, which i s a sequel to the book of Ezra. Along with Nehemiah he took steps to instruct the people in t he Mosaic law (Neh. 8). Hitherto ?the law? had been to a great extent the exclusive possessio n of the priests. It was now brought within the reach of every Jew. The open reading of ?th e book of the law? was a new departure, and marked the law as the center of Jewish national l ife.

        A good many traditions have gathered round the name of Ezra. He is said to have formed the ca non of Hebrew scripture and to have established an important national council, called the Gre at Synagogue, over which he presided. But for none of these traditions is there trustworthy e vidence. The Jews of later days were inclined to attribute to the influence of Ezra every rel igious development between the days of Nehemiah and the Maccabees.

        BIBLE DICTIONARY
        EZRA
        A famous priest and scribe who brought back part of the exiles from captivity (Ezra 7 - 10; N eh. 8; Neh. 12). The object of his mission was to teach in Israel statutes and judgments. I n 458 B.C. he obtained from Artaxerxes an important edict (Ezra 7: 12-26) allowing him to tak e to Jerusalem any Jewish exiles who cared to go, along with offerings for the temple with wh ich he was entrusted, and giving to the Jews various rights and privileges. He was also direc ted to appoint magistrates and judges. On arriving in Jerusalem his first reform was to caus e the Jews to separate from their foreign wives, and a list is given of those who had offende d in this way
        (Ezra 10). The later history of Ezra is found in the book of Nehemiah, which is a sequel to t he book of Ezra. Along with Nehemiah he took steps to instruct the people in the Mosaic law ( Neh. 8). Hitherto the law had been to a great extent the exclusive possession of the priests . It was now brought within the reach of every Jew. The open reading of the book of the law w as a new departure, and marked the law as the center of Jewish national life.

        A good many traditions have gathered round the name of Ezra. He is said to have formed the ca non of Hebrew scripture and to have established an important national council, called the Gre at Synagogue, over which he presided. But for none of these traditions is there trustworthy e vidence. The Jews of later days were inclined to attribute to the influence of Ezra every rel igious development between the days of Nehemiah and the Maccabees.

        The book of Ezra contains also an introductory section (chs. 1 - 6) describing events that ha ppened from 60 to 80 years before the arrival of Ezra in Jerusalem, that is, the decree of Cy rus, 537 B.C., and the return of Jews under Zerubbabel; the attempt to build the temple and t he hindrances due to the Samaritans; the preaching of Haggai and Zechariah, and the completio n of the temple, 516 B.C. There is no record in the book of any events between this date an d the mission of Ezra.

        Religious values in the book of Ezra are found in the teaching that (1) the promises of the L ord through his prophets shall all be fulfilled (Ezra 1: 1; cf. Jer. 25: 13; Jer. 29: 10; D& C 1: 37-38; D&C 5: 20); (2) discipline and patience are borne of disappointment, as one expec tation after another was frustrated; (3) there is eternal significance in everyday life; (4 ) preparation is needed for the rule of Messiah, the law being the schoolmaster to bring me n to Christ.
      6. Title: Popular Names from the Old Testament
        Publication: http://www.geocities.com/edgarbook/names/lists/oldtest.html
        Note: Ezra comes from a Hebrew name meaning "Help"; Ezar. Religious Figures: Ezra (3rd century B.C. ) -- A Hebrew priest and scribe in the Old Testament
      7. Title: About Judaism: A Glossary of Basic Jewish Terms and Concepts
        Author: Union Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America
        Publication: http://www.ou.org/about/judaism
        Note: Ezra HaSofer - Ezra the Scribe; a great leader of the Jewish People at the time of the buildi ng of the "Second Temple," in approximately year 516 B.C.E. He made many decrees preserving t he way of life of the Torah among the Jewish People. He mounted a strong campaign against int ermarriage among those who returned with him from Exile in Babylonia. In his greatness, he i s compared to Moshe.

        A Book of the Bible bears his name, and gives an historical account of his time. The word "So fer," meaning "Scribe," actually meant more than the current meaning of the term "Sofer." I t was the name given to the Scholarly Leaders of the People at that time in history.
      8. Title: A Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion
        Author: Louis Jacobs
        Publication: Oxford University Press, 1999. Oxford Reference Online. Oxford University Press. [http://www. oxfordreference.com/views]
        Note: EZRA
        The biblical leader of the exiles who had returned to Jerusalem in 458 BCE. Ezra's associat e was Nehemiah and the story of these two leaders is told in the books of Ezra and Nehemiah . He is described in the book of Ezra (7: 6, 11) as a scribe and is known in the Jewish tradi tion (which gives each of the biblical heroes his own particular appellation) as Ezra the Scr ibe. As told in the book of Ezra (chs. 9 and 10) Ezra fought against the marriage of Jews wit h foreign women, evicting these men and their children from the community.

        In the Rabbinic sources, Ezra is placed alongside Moses as the great teacher of the Torah. Sp inoza, a pioneer of biblical criticism, suggested that Ezra was the actual compiler of the To rah of Moses, the Pentateuch?a view that is obviously at variance with the tradition, althoug h the Rabis do speak of Ezra placing dots over certain letters in the Pentateuch because he w as uncertain whether the words over which the dots were placed belonged to the original Torah .
      9. Title: Web sites
        Note: Parashat Ki-Tavo 5756
        100 MINUS 2
        Ezra the scribe instituted the public reading of the Tochechah (a list of punishments reserve d for sinners) in Vayikra (26:14-43) before Shavuot, and that of Devarim (28:15-68) before Ro sh Hashanah. Why is that? In order that the past year finish along with all of the curses ass ociated with it.... Is Shavuot, then, a New Year's day? Yes, it is. As the Mishnah (Rosh Hash anah 16a) states, "There are four periods when the world is judged; on Pesach... on Shavuot.. . on Rosh Hashanah... and on Succot...."
        (Gemara Megillah 31b)
        Our custom is to read a Parasha that does not mention Tochechah the Shabbat before Rosh Hasha nah [and to read the Tochechah *two* weeks before Shavuot and Rosh Hashanah,] in order not t o read Tochechah immediately prior to Rosh Hashanah.
        (Tosafot ad loc., s.v. Kelalot)
        How does reading Tochechah before Rosh Hashanah herald a year of blessing? If anything, it wo uld seem as if we are "ushering in" Tochechah, rather than "ushering them out," as can be jud ged from the reasoning of Tosafot. An answer to this question may be deduced through a thorou gh examination of the Gemara, quoted above, that provides the source for this custom.

        II

        A number of questions may be asked on the words of the Gemara.
        (1) Firstly, why do we read specifically the *Vayikra* set of Tochechah before Shavuot and th e *Devarim* set before Rosh Hashanah?
        (2) Secondly, if there are actually four Rosh Hashanah's in the Mishnah, why did Ezra institu te to "end the year and its Tochechah" before only two of them? (3) Finally (as Maharatz Chay ot points out), it was once customary among the Jews of Israel to read much smaller weekly To rah portions. Because of this, it took them about three years to finish the entire Torah (Meg illah 29b). How would the Jews of Israel fulfill Ezra's institution of reading the Tochecha h before Rosh Hashanah? They only read each set of Tochechah once in three years!
        ...[More]
        (http://www.shemayisrael.co.il/parsha/kornfeld/archives/ki-tavo.htm)
      10. Title: Web sites
        Note: E Z R A.
        The Jewish church puts on quite another face in this book from what it had appeared wit h; its state much better, and more pleasant, than it was of late in Babylon, and yet far infe rior to what it had been formerly. The dry bones here live again, but in the form of a servan t; the yoke of their captivity is taken off, but the marks of it in their galled necks remain . Kings we hear no more of; the crown has fallen from their heads. Prophets they are blesse d with, to direct them in their re-establishment, but, after a while, prophecy ceases among t hem, till the great prophet appears, and his fore-runner.
        The history of this book is the accomplishment of Jeremiah's prophecy concerning the return o f the Jews out of Babylon at the end of seventy years, and a type of the accomplishment of th e prophecies of the Apocalypse concerning the deliverance of the gospel church out of the New -Testament Babylon. Ezra preserved the records of that great revolution and transmitted the m to the church in this book. His name signifies a helper; and so he was to that people. A pa rticular account concerning him we shall meet with, ch. vii., where he himself enters upon th e stage of action.
        The book gives us an account,
        I. Of the Jews' return out of their captivity, ch. i., ii.
        II. Of the building of the temple, the opposition it met with, and yet the perfecting of it a t last, ch. iii.-vi.
        III. Of Ezra's coming to Jerusalem, ch. vii., viii.
        IV. Of the good service he did there, in obliging those that had married strange wives to pu t them away, ch. ix., x. This beginning again of the Jewish nation was small, yet its latte r end greatly increased.
        Matthew Henry --Commentary on the Whole Bible (1712)
        (http://www.ccel.org/h/henry/mhc2/MHC00000.HTM)

        THE BOOK OF
        J O S H U A.
        ...And, if one may offer a mere conjecture, it is not unlikely that the historical books, t o the end of the Kings, were put together by Jeremiah the prophet, a little before the captiv ity; for it is said of Ziklag (1 Sam. xxvii. 6) that it pertains to the kings of Judah (whic h style began after Solomon and ended in the captivity) unto this day. And it is still more p robable that those which follow were put together by Ezra the scribe, some time after the cap tivity. ...
        Matthew Henry -- Commentary on the Whole Bible (1708)
        (http://www.ccel.org/h/henry/mhc2/MHC00000.HTM)
      11. Title: Web sites
        Note: Ezra
        Scribe who helped establish Jewish practices in Jerusalem after the exile.

        Ezra was devoted to Israel's Law

        Torah Scroll
        A member of a Jewish priestly family in exiled in Babylonia, Ezra was also a scribe skilled i n the law of Moses. The Book of Ezra recounts the return of the exiles from Babylon, the rebu ilding of the Jerusalem Temple and the rebuilding of the community under Ezra. Ezra's progra m required that Jewish men divorce Gentile wives to help maintain Israel's distinctive identi ty. He provided for the public reading of the Torah, public confession of sin, and renewed co mmitment to God.

        Ezra 7:1-10 - Goes from Babylonia to Jerusalem
        Neh 8:1-8 - Publicly reads the law
        (http://demo.lutherproductions.com/bibletutor/level1/program/start/people/ezra.htm)
      12. Title: Wikipedia
        Publication: http://en.wikipedia.org
        Note: Ezra
        Ezra (???????, Standard Hebrew ?Ezra, Tiberian Hebrew ?Ezrā: short for ?????????? "My help/co urt is God", Standard Hebrew ?Azri?el, Tiberian Hebrew ?Azrī??l) was the "scribe" who led th e second body of exiled Israelites that returned from Babylon to Jerusalem in 459 BCE, and i s probably the author of the Book of Ezra and the Book of 1 Chronicles in the Bible.

        He was the son, or perhaps grandson, of Seraiah (2 Kings 25:18-21), and a lineal descendant o f Phinehas, the son of Aaron (Ezra 7:1-5). All that is known of his personal history is conta ined in the last four chapters of his book, and in the Book of Nehemiah 8 and 12:26.

        In the seventh year of the reign of Artaxerxes Longimanus (see also Darius I of Persia), he o btained leave to go up to Jerusalem and to take with him a company of Israelites (Ezra 8). Ar taxerxes manifested great interest in Ezra's undertaking, granting him "all his request", an d loading him with gifts for the house of God. Ezra assembled the band of exiles, probably ab out 5,000 in all, who were prepared to go up with him to Jerusalem, on the banks of the Ahava , where they rested for three days, and were put into order for their march across the desert , which was completed in four months. His activities in Jerusalem following his arrival are r ecorded in his book.

        For about fourteen years, (i.e., until 445 BCE), there is no record of what went on in Jerusa lem after Ezra had set in order the ecclesiastical and civil affairs of the nation. In that y ear another distinguished personage, Nehemiah, appears. After the ruined wall of the city ha d been rebuilt by Nehemiah, there was a great gathering of the people at Jerusalem preparator y to the dedication of the wall. On the appointed day the whole population assembled, and th e Torah was read aloud to them by Ezra and his assistants (Neh. 8:3). The remarkable scene i s described in detail. There was a great religious awakening. For successive days, beginnin g on Rosh Hashanah (the first day of the seventh month) they rejoiced in the holy days of th e month of Tishri. Ezra read to them the entire scroll of the Torah and he and various schola rs and Levites explained and interpreted the deeper meanings and applications of the Torah t o the assembled crowd. These festivities culminated in a very enthusiastic and joyous seven d ay celebration of the Festival of Sukkot, concluding on the eighth day with the holiday of Sh emini Atzeret. On the twenty-fourth day, immediately following the holidays they held a solem n assembly, fasting and confessing their sins and the iniquities of their fathers. Then, the y renewed their national covenant to follow God's Torah, given through the hand of Moses, an d to observe and fulfill all of the Lord's commandments, laws and decrees (Neh. 10:30). Abuse s were rectified, and arrangements for the temple service completed, and now nothing remaine d but the dedication of the walls of the city (Neh. 12).

        1 Relation to the Book of Ruth
        According to many scholars, the Book of Ruth was originally a part of the Book of Judges, bu t it was later separated from that book and made into a separate book. Its opening verse expl icitly places it during the time period of the Judges, and its language and description see m to make the authorship contemporary with that period. On the other hand, the message of th e book, which shows acceptance of marrying converts to Judaism, has been used to suggest tha t the book was written during the early days of the Persian period. At that time, Ezra condem ned intermarriages and, according to his eponymous book, forced the Israelites to abandon the ir non-Jewish wives who did not convert. According to this theory, the Book of Ruth was writt en in response to Ezra's reform and in defense of these marriages. More likely, the book wa s a response to critics of King David, who contested his qualifications as a Jew due to his M oabite ancestry. In that context, the book uses the precedent set by a Jewish court, lead b y Boaz, to demonstrate that a Moabitess could convert and be a member of the Children of Isra el.

        2 Place in editing the Torah and Bible
        According to Rabbinic Jewish tradition, Ezra collected and arranged the canon of the Hebrew B ible. Information on his activities in this regard are found in the Talmud and in the midras h literature.

        In the view of many modern scholars, these sources provide one set of evidence in favor of th e documentary hypothesis. In this view, some midrash compilations retain evidence of the reda ctional period during which Ezra redacted and canonized the text of the Torah as we know it t oday. This idea is discussed by Rabbi David Weiss Halivni in his works Revelation Restored: D ivine Writ and Critical Responses (Westview Press, 1997), and Peshat and Derash: Plain and Ap plied Meaning in Rabbinic Exegesis (Oxford University Press, 1998). Richard Elliot Friedman s uggests that Ezra was the second editor who combined the priestly source into the Torah and t hat the J and E sources had been combined by an earlier editor. If so Ezra seems to have bee n careful to preserve almost all of the original sources in the final composite.[1] Jewish so urces do not mention editing or redacting the Torah. Rather, the aggada suggests that Ezra an d the Men of the Great Assembly edited such works as Daniel, Esther and Ezekiel (Bava Batra 1 4b).

        3 Ezra in the Qur'an
        Ezra is also mentioned in the Muslim Qur'an as Uzair "9:30: The Jews call 'UZAIR a son of All ah, and the Christians call Jesus the son of Allah. That is a saying from their mouth; (in th is) they but imitate what the unbelievers of old used to say. Allah's curse be on them: how t hey are deluded away from the Truth!" There is historical evidence that Jews did refer to Ezr a as the son of Allah, the Encyclopaedia Judaica states: "H. Z. Hirschberg proposed another a ssumption, based on the words of Ibn Hazm, namely, that the 'righteous who live in Yemen beli eved that 'Uzayr was indeed the son of Allah.' According to other Muslim sources, there wer e some Yemenite Jews who had converted to Islam who believed that Ezra was the messiah. For M uhammad, Ezra, the apostle of messiah, can be seen in the same light as the Christian saw Jes us, the messiah, the son of Allah." Encyclopaedia Judaica, Ibid., p. 1108.

        He is also mentioned in the Hadith of seeing God as the clear as the sun.
        (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ezra)
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