Updated Simon Hoyte of Somerset County England with Biblical, World Royalty & Pharaonic Connections

Entries: 119159    Updated: 2017-11-21 02:55:14 UTC (Tue)    Owner: John E Hoyt    Home Page: Updated Descendants of the Simon Hoyt/e Families with Biblical, World Royalty & Pharaonic Connections  Note: You will leave RootsWeb

Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM

  • ID: I99399
  • Name: Khufu (Cheops) (Kheops) (Medjedu) of Snofru of Huni
  • Surname: Snofru of Huni
  • Given Name: Khufu (Cheops) (Kheops) (Medjedu) of
  • Prefix: Pharaoh
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: ABT 2600 BC in Egypt
  • Death: 2528 BC
  • _UID: 3C495B41CC80254C9CD8D5CD05FD1CCADC50
  • Event: Reign from 2551 BC to 2528
  • Note:

    Please send corrections to rootsweb@propheticmidrash.com
    1 2
  • Change Date: 26 Apr 2006 at 01:00:00



    Father: Snofru (Nebmaat Snefru) of Huni b: ABT 2625 BC in Egypt
    Mother: Hetepheres I, daughter of Huni b: in Egypt

    Marriage 1 Meritates II (Merityetes II) b: in Egypt
      Children
      1. Has Children Kewab (Kawab) of Khufu of Snofru b: ABT 2575 BC in Egypt
      2. Has Children Radjedef (Djedefre) (Kheper) (Redjedef) of Khufu of Snofru b: ABT 2575 BC in Egypt
      3. Has No Children Associates of Pharaoh Khufu of Snofru foster b: in Egypt
      4. Has No Children AKA Pharaoh (Khufu) Cheops of Snofru foster b: in Egypt
      5. Has No Children AKA Pharaoh (Khufu) Kheops of Snofru foster b: in Egypt

      Marriage 2 Henutsen (wife of Khufu) b: in Egypt
        Children
        1. Has Children Khafre (Chephren) (Khephren) (Re-khaf) (Userib) of Khufu of Snofru b: ABT 2575 BC in Egypt
        2. Has Children Khufu-khaf of Khufu of Snofru b: in Egypt

        Marriage 3 Spouse Unknown
          Children
          1. Has Children Khamernebti I (Khamerernebty) of Khufu of Snofru b: ABT 2575 BC in Egypt
          2. Has Children Hetepheres II of Khufu of Snofru b: ABT 2575 BC in Egypt
          3. Has No Children Menkhaf of Khufu of Snofru b: ABT 2575 BC in Egypt

          Marriage 4 Senti of Snofru of Huni b: in Egypt
            Children
            1. Has No Children Associates of Princess Senti of Snofru foster b: in Egypt

            Sources:
            1. Title: Encyclopedia of the Rulers of Egypt
              Author: Egypt State Information Service
              Publication: http://www.sis.gov.eg/rulers/html/en01p.htm
              Note: Khufu
              (Cheops) 2551 to 2528 B.C.
              Cheops was the second king of the 4th Dynasty and was the builder of the Great Pyramid of Giz a. Khufu was succeeded by Radjedef, his son by a lessor wife, whose reign was abruptly ended . He was succeeded by Khephren, Khufu's son by Queen Henutsen. A miniature statue of Khufu i s on display at the Cairo Museum. This is the only likeness of him known to be in existence.
            2. Title: Web sites
              Note: Kheops
              Kheops is the second and most famous king of the 4th Dynasty. He was the son of Snofru and He tepheres I. He at least had two wives, probably even as much as four, with whom he had severa l children. Queen Meritates bore him Kawab, Hor-djedef, Hetepheres II and Meresankh II. Wit h Henutsen, Kheops had Re-khaf (the later king Khephren) and Khufu-khaf as children. Other ch ildren of Kheops are Re-djedef, who would succeed Kheops as Djedefre, Hor-baf, who is sometim es supposed to have become the otherwise unattested king Bakare, and Khamernebti I.

              According to Manetho and Herodotos, Kheops would have ruled for 63 years. The Turin King-list , however, only notes 23 years for the successor of Snofru. Although the name of the king o n this line is missing, it does apply to Kheops, being Snofru?s successor.

              Like his father, Kheops seems to have been intent on establishing a more or less permanent mi litary presence in the Sinai, probably to prevent the Bedouins from interrupting the work i n the turquoise mines. An inscription in Aswan demonstrates Kheops? interest in this region a s well, as it was the main quarry of the granite needed to build his pyramid. A stela found n ear Abu Simbel and some fragments of an alabaster object found in Byblos, indicate some comme rcial activity with Nubia and Palestine.

              Following his father's example, Kheops again built his funerary monument away from his predec essor?s. Building activity was moved from Dashur to Giza, to the North of the capital Memphis . There he built the monument that has made him one of the most famous kings of the Ancient E gyptian history: the great pyramid of Giza. Herodotos? account of thousands of slaves labouri ng for 20 years to build this monument, is now seen as incorrect. It is now accepted that th e harder labour, such as moving and placing the granite and calcite blocks, was done by farme rs during the annual 4-month inundation of the Nile. Recent discoveries have shown that the y were housed and paid and that they were even buried near the pyramid of the king, so that t hey could be part of the king?s eternal life after death.

              Herodotos, however, did not invent Kheops? bad reputation. This had, in fact, become part o f the Egyptian tradition centuries before this Greek traveller visited Egypt. The Middle King dom story recorded on the Westcar Papyrus, which shows Snofru as a wise and kind man, describ es Kheops as a cruel and tyrannical ruler, with no respect for life.
              (http://www.ancient-egypt.org/kings/0402_kheops/history.html)
          • We want to hear from you! Take our WorldConnect survey

            Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM

            Printer Friendly Version Printer Friendly Version Search Ancestry Search Ancestry Search WorldConnect Search WorldConnect Join Ancestry.com Today! Join Ancestry.com Today!

            WorldConnect Home | WorldConnect Global Search | WorldConnect Help
            We want to hear from you! Take our WorldConnect survey

            RootsWeb.com is NOT responsible for the content of the GEDCOMs uploaded through the WorldConnect Program. The creator of each GEDCOM is solely responsible for its content.