Bruce Cooley Pusch

Entries: 181836    Updated: 2014-09-21 17:03:21 UTC (Sun)    Owner: Jennifer    Home Page: SEE FOOTNOTES FOR LINKS TO OUR OTHER TREES FOR UPDATES  Note: You will leave RootsWeb

Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM

  • ID: I99530
  • Name: ANGHARAT (NOTES) VERCH ALDUD OR (L) OWAIN
  • Sex: F
  • Birth: BET 1065 AND 1084 in TEGAINGL, WALES
  • ALIA: ANGHARAT (NOTES) VERCH (L) ALDUD
  • Event: 1 AKA ANGHARAD (NOTES) FERCH (L) OWAIN
  • Event: 2 AKA ANGHARAD (NOTES) VERCH (L) OWEN AP EDWIN AP GORONWY
  • Event: 3 AKA Angharad (NOTES) verch (L) Owain (Angharat of Tegeingl)
  • Death: 1162
  • Note:
    SOME SOURCES SAY ANGHARAT'S PARENTS WERE OWAIN OR ALDUD PRINCE OF TEGAINGL AP (L) EDWIN AND MORWYL OR MORFYDD BENDEW VERCH (L) EDNYWAIN AND HER GRANDPARENTS WERE .EDWIN OR EDWYN (NOTES) AP GORONWY OR (L) GRONWY AND ANGHARAD EFERYDD IWERYDD (NOTE) VERCH (L) CYNFYN

    OTHER POSSIBLE PARENTS ARE SHOWN BELOW BUT THIS INDIVIDUAL IS NOT SHOWN AS A CHILD ON THE FOLLOWING POSSIBLE PARENTS' FAMILY PAGES, TO DO SO WOULD BE CONSIDERED ERRORS BY THIS PROGRAM. EVEN THOUGH THESE LAST POSSIBLE PARENTS MAY BE THE CORRECT ONES, SHOWING MORE THAN ONE SET OF PARENTS COULD CAUSE MY "FAMILY TREE" PROGRAM TO MALFUNCTION.

    OTHER SOURCES SAY HER MOTHER WAS GWERYDD (NOTES) VERCH (L) CYNVYN ANOTHER OF HER FATHER OWAIN'S WIVES.

    STILL OTHER SOURCES SAY HER PARENTS WERE (HER GRANDPARENTS ABOVE) .EDWIN OR EDWYN (NOTES) AP GORONWY OR (L) GRONWY AND ANGHARAD EFERYDD IWERYDD (NOTE) VERCH (L) CYNFYN.

    AND STILL OTHER SOURCES SAY HER MOTHER WAS IWERYDD (NOTES) AP (L) LLYWELYN ANOTHER WIVE OF HER GRANDFATHER .EDWIN OR EDWYN (NOTES) AP GORONWY OR (L) GRONWY.

    THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS RECEIVED FROM Alton Rogers aer437@yahoo.com IN APRIL 2009.

    THE PORTION OF THE INFORMATION HE GAVE ME RELATING TO THIS PERSON IS POSTED BELOW (THE INFORMATION RELATING TO OTHERS IS POSTED ON THEIR INDIVIDUAL PAGES)

    file: Skepper 7

    OUR ANCESTRY FROM ROYAL AND HISTORIC PERSONS OF THE KINGDOMS OF NORTH WALES - FROM 4TH CENTURY ROMAN BRITAIN
    Kings of Gwynedd, Powys, other Welsh royalty and historic persons of Wales and Britain.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Note: the basic data for entries # 25 through # 33 are from the 8th edition of the book “Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700”.
    -----------------------------------
    Per www.earlybritishkingdoms.com, the following are generations prior to those in the basic file, extending back in time to the arrival of the Romans in Britain in the 1st century A.D. and back into the B.C. era:
    The link references Jesus College MS 20, Harleian MS 3859 and other early Welsh genealogical tracts:
    - Beli Magni/Beli Mawr (the Great)
    - Amalech/Aballac
    - Ewain/Owain
    - Eugein/Brithguein
    - Dubun/Oumun
    - Eimet/Eifudd
    - Anguerit/Amguoloyt
    - Gurdumn/Dumn
    - Guordoli/Doli
    - Guorcein/Cein
    - Genedawc/Genedog
    - Iago
    - Tegyth/Tactius see generation # 1
    - Padarn Beisrud/Patern Pesrut/Padernus ‘of the Red Robe’ see generation # 2
    - Edern/Aeternus see generation # 3
    - Cuneda/Cunedda Wledig (the Imperator) see generation # 4
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Gruffydd married c.1095:
    Angharad verch Owain (Angharat of Tegeingl) (c.1084-1162)

    She was a daughter of Owain ap Edwin* (d.1105), Lord of Tegeingl in eastern Gwynedd (modern Flintshire), and a great-granddaughter of Leofric, Earl of Mercia and his wife Godgifyu who was possibly the famous ‘Lady Godiva” who rude nude on her horse through Coventry.
    Angharad is singled out for praise by her husband’s biographer as a handsome blonde, gentle, eloquent, discreet, good to her people and charitable to the poor. Gruffydd left her, in addition to half of his goods as provided by Welsh law, two shares of land (rhandir) and the profits of the port of Abermenai.

    * Owain ap Edwin was also the grandfather of Christina verch Gronwy, 2nd wife of Owain-Gwynedd ap Gruffydd.

    Two of their children were in our ancestry, Owain and Susanna, and the wife of one, Alice de Clare, was our ancestor with her first husband, William de Percy:
    1. Owain “Gwynedd” ap Gruffydd succeeded his father as King of Gwynedd (see # 27 following >>>>>>>>>)
    2. Cadwaladr ap Gruffydd (c.1096-1172), married (as her 2nd husband) Alice de Clare, daughter of Richard Fitz Gilbert de Clare, murdered in Wales 15 April 1136.
    Cadwaladr first appears in the historical record in 1136, when following the 1136 killing of the lord of Ceredigion, Richard Fitz Gilbert de Clare, he accompanied his brother Owain Gwynedd in an invasion of Ceredigion, due to the vacuum left by the lord’s murder. Upon his father’s death, he was given lands in northern Ceredigion. In 1141, he joined with Randulph, Earl of Chester in the attack on Lincoln, when King Stephen of England was taken prisoner. This alliance was probably linked to his marriage to Alice de Clare.
    Alice de Clare (also known as Adeliza de Tonbridge) (d.1160s) was our ancestor with her marriage to her 1st husband, William de Percy II (d.1175)
    For more on this family, see More file M1A # 3, Skepper file 5 # 3, & More-Hastings file MH1K # 4.
    -----------------------------------
    3. Susanna verch Gruffydd married Madog ap Maredudd, son of Maredudd ap Bleddyn, Prince of Powys and Hunydd verch Einudd.
    Note: see # 27 >> these were the parents of Marared verch Madog, wife of Iorwerth ap Owain Gwynedd‘s son Iorwerth “Drwyndwn” ap Owain Gwynedd.
    See file More 3 # 2
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    S7-20

    Line 176B-25
    Line 239-6
    27. Owain-Gwynedd ap Gruffydd (Owain I Gwynedd) King of Gwynedd
    He was born c.1104 in Aberffraw Castle, Anglesey, Wales and died on 28 November 1170 in Caernarvonshire, Wales.
    He was buried in Bangor Cathedral in North Wales.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bangor_Cathedral
    In 1137 he succeeded his father Gruffydd ap Cynan to the kingdom of Gwynedd, which covered most of North Wales of which he was king until his death.

    Early in his reign Owain, took advantage of the troubles reign of England’s King Stephen and used his skill as statesman and solider to extend his frontiers, seizing neighboring territories.

    In 1154, when King Henry II came to the English throne, he was determined to restore authority to the English kingdom and to repair damage caused by civil strife and the lack of a strong central administration. And by 1157, he turned his attention to Wales by leading his first campaign against Owain, but it ended in a truce, wherein he kept almost all the territory he had gained, with the exception of Tegeinel in the extreme north-east. He was required to do homage to Henry but it was not long before Owain was acting with complete independence.

    Owain Gwynedd, in the north, was one of the princes who carried Wales through these difficult years. He had to deal with rival Welsh dynasties, to deal with Marcher lords, and to live in the shadow of a rich and powerful neighbor. Owain quickly gauged the political realities of the day, and however often he had to yield, he did not lose the initiative.

    In 1160, when Madog ap Maredudd died, he attacked Powys and extended his influence to the east.

    In 1165 he did homage to King Henry and made no attempt to break the feudal link with England, but at the climax of his career, after the general uprising of 1165, he destroyed the royal stronghold of Tegeingl and established the power of Aberffraw along the estuary of the River Dee.

    In 1166, when England attempted to reduce the Welsh princes from client status to that of dependent vassalage, the subsequent uprising was led by Owain and Rhys ap Gruffydd of south Wales.

    King Henry’s second attempt at subduing Wales failed ignominiously and left Owain free to capture Basingwek and Rhuddlan castles (1166-67).

    S7-21

    In 1168 he set about negotiations with King Louis VII of France to build an alliance between Gwynedd and France against their common enemy. Having openly defied Henry in 1168 by offering to help Louis, Owain maintained his independent position until his death.

    He left behind a reputation of wisdom and magnanimity.

    After him the rulers of Gwynedd were styled Prince of Aberffraw and Lord of Snowdon.

    The reign of Owain-Gwynedd:
    The reign of Owain Gwynedd marked the most peaceful period of Welsh independence, when the native princes absorbed many of the current European reforming ideas and adapted the more effective structures of both church and state to their own society.
    Monastic foundations were encouraged, diocesan boundaries defined, and many stone churches built. Motte-and-bailey earthwork castles identical to those built earlier by the Norman invaders were now erected by the princes as centers of many of their personal estates. Two of Owain’s sons are credited with building the first stone castles in Gwynedd towards the end of the 12th century.
    The tragedy, recurrent in Welsh history, was that Owain was not followed immediately by a strong ruler. Upon his death in 1170, open warfare broke out between his sons: Dafydd and Rhodri killed their elder half-brother, Hywel, and for the next 20 years Gwynedd was divided between them and their kinsmen. Gwynedd and Wales would not see another strong leader until Llywelyn the Great extended his control over most of Wales in the later part of the century.

    Owain Gwynedd married (1st) c.1125:
    Gwladys (Gladys) verch Llywarch Line 176B-25*
    She was born c. 1112 in Arwystli, Mongomeryshire,Wales.

    * “Line” numbers are from the book “Ancestral Roots” (see sources on sheet 34)
    Line 176B-24
    She was a daughter of Llywarch ap Trahaearn ap Caradog, Lord of Arwystli and Pembroke and his wife Dyddgu verch Iorwerth of Builth. Llywarch’s father Trahaearn ap Caradog had been killed in 1081 by Owain’s father Gruffydd ap Cynan.

    Owain and and his 1st wife Gwladys had this son in our ancestry:
    Iorwerth “Drwyndwn” ap Owain Gwynedd Prince of North Wales and Lord of Nant Conwy
    He was born c.1130 at Aberffraw Castle, Anglesey, Wales and died c.1174. He was killed in battle at a place called “Pennant Mehangell” during the wars deciding the succession following the death of his father.

    S7-22

    Iorwerth married c.1170:
    Marared/Margred (Margaret) verch Madog born c.1150.

    She was a daughter of Madog ap Maredudd*, Prince of Powys (d.1160) and Susanna verch Gruffydd, daughter of Gruffydd ap Cynan and Angarad verch Owain (our ancestors - see # 26).

    *Madog ap Maredudd was the last prince of the entire Kingdom of Powys. He is recorded as taking part in the Battle of Lincoln in 1141 in support of the Earl of Chester, along with Owain Gwynedd’s brother Cadwaladr ap Gruffydd and a large army of Welshmen. In 1149 he is recorded giving the commote of Cyfeiliog to his nephews Owain Cyfeiliog and his brother Meurig. The same year Madog was able to seize Owestry from William Fitz Alan. In 1157 when King Henry II invaded Gwynedd he was supported by Madog, who was able to regain many of his lands, which were given up to Owain Gwynedd in 1150 when he, along with Ranulf, Earl of Chester, was defeated at Coleshill.
    After his death in 1160, Powys was never reunited, being separated into two parts Powys Fadog and Powys Wenwynwyn.
    ------------------------------------
    Iorwerth Drwyndwn ap Owain Gwynedd & Margred verch Madog had a son who was our ancestor:
    Llywelyn Fawr ’the Great” ap Iorwerth (b.1173).
    For more on his very great man in Welsh history, see More file M3 # 2.
    ---------------------------------------
    Owain Gwynedd married (2nd) c.1150 (outside the church):
    Christina verch Gronwy, born c.1132.
    Her name in Welsh was Cristin.

    She was the daughter of Gronwy ap Owain ap Edwin (d.1124), son of Owain ap Edwin* (d.1105), and accordingly, her husband’s first cousin. Because of this, the marriage was not recognized by the Church, and (St.) Thomas Becket (d.1170), the historically famous Archbishop of Canterbury in the time of Henry II, and Pope Alexander III, not long before Owain’s death, urged a separation. But the prince, whose affection for Christina was manifest, was obdurate and, in consequence, died under excommunication.
    As a widow, she actively supported her sons Dafydd and Rhodri in their attack upon their half-brother Hywel in 1170.
    An unknown Welsh poet, playing upon her name, spoke bitterly of her unchristian behavior.

    *Owain ap Edwin - he was the father of Angharad verch Owain, wife of Gruffydd ap Cynan - see # 26.

    S7-23
    Christina and her husband were both the grandchildren of Owain ap Edwin, Lord of Tegeinel

    One of the daughters of Owain Gwynedd & Christina verch Gronwy was our ancestor: Gwenllian verch Owain-Gwynedd >>>>>>>>>> see # 28
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    28. Gwenllian verch Owain-Gwynedd
    She was born c.1155/60.

    She married c.1175:
    Owain-Cyfeiliog ap Gruffydd Prince of Powys Wenwynwyn* (see following)
    He was born c.1130 and died in 1197.
    He was buried in the Abbey of Strata Marcella, on the west bank of the Severn River near Welshpool, Powys.

    Owain was a prince of the southern part of Powys and a notable poet. He is usually known as Owain Cyfeiliog to distinguish him from another contemporary ruler, Owain ap Gruffydd of Gwynedd known as Owain Gwynedd - his father-in-law.

    He was a son of Gruffydd ap Maredudd (d.1128) and Gwerfyl verch Gwrgeneu, daughter of Gwrgeneu ap Hywel and Margred verch Rhys.

    He was also a nephew of Madog ap Maredudd, the last prince of Powys. Madog gave his nephew the commote of Cyfeiliog to rule in 1147.

    About 1153 Rhys ap Gruffydd attacked his commote, and although Owain was later to marry his daughter, as his second wife, they remained enemies for years.

    On Madog’s death in 1160 Owain held Cyfeiliog on his own account and became the ruler of most of southern Powys.

    In 1163 he joined with Owain Fychan, to capture and destroy the royal castle of Carreghofa.

    In 1165 he is found with other princes of Powys and the other Welsh provinces in the great muster under Owain Gwynedd facing Henry II’s attack in the Berwyn district.

    In 1166, however, he again joined with Owain Fychan to drive Owain Goch from Mochnant, which they divided between them by a line which still remains as the border of Denbighshire and Montgomeryshire.

    Also in 1167, he reverted to Madog ap Maredudd’s policy of friendship with England, and remained fairly constant to it for the remainder of his life.
    S7-24
    In 1167 he was attacked by Owain Gwynedd and Rhys ap Gruffydd of South Wales who seized the commote of Caereinion and gave it to Owain Fychan, but Owain Cyfeiliog soon regained it with English aid.

    In 1170 he established the Cistercian monastery of Strata Marcella.

    In 1173 he again supported the English, and was present at the Council of Oxford in 1177.

    In 1188 he was the only Welsh prince who refused to support the efforts of archbishop Baldwin and Giraldus Cambrensis to preach the Crusade, for which he was excommunicated.

    He is recorded as having been in alliance with the other Welsh princes to withstand the invasion of 1165 by King Henry II of England. Thereafter he usually followed a policy of supporting the English crown.

    In 1195 it would appear that he handed over the reins of government to his son Gwenwynwyn, and retired to the monastery of Starta marcella, where he died in 1197, and where he lies buried.

    In 1195 Owain handed the rule of his realm to his son Gwenwynwyn ap Owain and retired to the Abbey of Strata Marcella (see history following), where he died and was buried two years later.

    *Powys Wenwynwyn (Welsh: Powys Cyfeiliog)
    It was the southern portion of the formerly princely state of Powys which split following the death of Madog ap Maredudd of Powys in 1160. The realm had been split, with the northern portion (Maelor) going to Gruffydd Maelor I and becoming known, eventually, as Powys Fadog and the southern portion (Cyfeiliog) going to Owain Cyfeiliog and becoming known, eventually, as Powys Wenwynwyn after Prince Gwenwynwyn ap Owain, its second ruler.

    Powys Wenwynwyn and the kingdom of Gwynedd became bitter rivals in the years that followed with the former frequently allying itself with England to further its own aims in weakening the latter.
    ----------------------
    Owain appears in the (fictional) romance of Fulke Fitz Warin as a knight who strikes Fulk with a spear.
    -----------------------------------
    Gwenllian verch Owain-Gwynedd and Owain-Cyfeiliog ap Gruffydd were succeeded by their son Gwenwynwyn ab Owain-Cyfeiliog (see # 29) >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    -----------------------------------------

    S7-25
    Owain’s (2nd) wife was ____________, a daughter of his life-long enemy, Rhys ap Gruffydd.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Abbey of Strata Marcella (known in Welsh as Abaty Ystrad Marchell), was a medieval Cistercian monastery located on the west bank of the River Severn near Welshpool, Powys, Wales. In the early 13th century this was the largest Cistercian abbey in Wales. This was one of a number of Cistercian abbeys founded by Welsh princes which operated independently from the Norman-founded abbeys in England. As such, they tended to support Welsh princes in their struggles against King Edward and the marcher lords and because of this the abbey suffered much damage during the Welsh wars of independence. During the Owain Glyndwr rising at the beginning of the 15th century the buildings were heavily damaged and the monastery never completely recovered. The Abbey was finally dissolved in 1536 at the Dissolution of the Monasteries in England and Wales, and today is in ruins.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    29. Gwenwynwyn ap Owain-Cyfeiliog Prince of Southern (lower) Powys
    He was born c.1183 in Wales and died 1216 in exile.

    He ruled southern Powys from 1195, having taken control following the death of his father Owain Cyfeiliog.

    He was the last major ruler of mid-Wales before the completion of the English conquest.

    When, in 1197, Gwenwynwyn acquired the lordship of Arwystli, almost the entire territory lying between the Tanat and the Severn rivers, with extensions into the valleys of the Dovey and upper Wye, came under his jurisdiction. Henceforth, the whole area was known as Powys Wenwynwyn, an area very broadly speaking co-extensive with the modern county of Montgomery; this was to distinguish it from the later Denbighshire portion of ancient Powys, or Powys Fadog - so-called after Gwenwynwyn’s second cousin, Madog ap Gruffydd Maelor I, who came into sole possession of that region at about this time.

    Apart from having left a permanent stamp on the nomenclature of central Wales, Gwenwynwyn, during the first years of his career, made the boldest bid for Welsh political leadership ever undertaken by a prince of the royal house of Powys. He was not without the requisite courage and ambition, and a critical lull in the domestic fortunes of the royal families of Gwynedd and Deheubarth provided an opportunity for action. After a few easy successes, however, Gwenwynwyn fell victim to the forces which had recurrently in the past kept Powys from achieving anything more than a fleeting pre-eminence among the native dynasties of Wales

    S7-26
    Two attacks on Marcher territory between the Wye and Severn were disastrous for him, and on the second occasion, in 1208, he was deprived by King John of all his lands.
    The 1208 attack came, following the marriage of Llywelyn the Great (Llywelyn Fawr) and Joan of England (our ancestors), when warfare broke out once more between Gwenwywnwyn and Llywelyn.

    As a result of Gwenwynwyn’s activities, King John confiscated his lands and allowed Llywelyn to steal Ceredigion Powys. Gwenwynwyn did not get his territory back for two years, but his resentment towards the English led him him an alliance with Llywelyn, which lasted from 1212 until 1216, when John restored some of Gwenwynwyn’s property and the two princes fell out again.

    He was driven out of his princedom by Llywelyn the Great and is believed to have died in exile or been killed in 1216.

    He was survived by his son Gruffydd ap Gwenwynwyn whose forces were one of those that in December 1282 who killed Llywelyn the Great’s grandson and the last native Prince of Wales, Llywelyn ap Gruffydd.

    He married c.1212 Margaret Corbet (of Caus). She was born c.1201.

    She was a daughter of Robert Corbet, Baron of Caus (d. 1222) and Emma Pantulf (Pantolph) (d. before 1227). (see file HS11-5)

    Their child was Gruffydd ap Gwenwynwyn (see # 30).
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    30. Gruffydd ap Gwenwynwyn Prince of Powys (Lord of Upper Powys)
    He was born c. 1215 probably in Powys, Wales and died between 21 February 1286 and the end of 1287.

    He was also known as Griffith de la Pole.

    He was a Welsh prince who was lord of part of Powys known as Powys Wenwynwyn.

    He was an infant when his father died an exile in 1216, and was excluded from his inheritance until after the death of Llywelyn I, meanwhile spending his youth and early manhood in England, maintained by the king, dependent on royal bounty and his mother’s dowry. He did not return to Wales until after Llywelyn’s death.

    When Dafydd II submitted to Henry III in 1241, the king invested Gruffydd (on strictly feudal terms) with the lordship of family lands in Arwystli, Cyfeiliog, Mawddwy, Caereinion, Y Tair Swydd, and Upper Mochnant, he paying homage to Henry for them.

    S7-27
    Steadfast in his loyalty to the Crown during the first decade of Llywelyn II’s rise to power, he suffered a renewed loss of patrimony and was driven into a second exile in 1257.

    In 1263, with evident reluctance, and though deprived of the lands of Cyfeiliog lying north of the Dovey (Afon Dyfi) river, he agreed to transfer his allegiance to Llywelyn and co-operate in the latter’s plan for the creation of a native feudal principality. This arrangement, confirmed in the Treaty of Montgomery (1267), lasted until 1274, the year of the notorious plot against Llywelyn’s life, in which his wife Hawise and her eldest son, Owen, were deeply implicated.

    From the shelter of his third exile at Shrewsbury in Salop, Gruffydd (not without some suspicion of royal encouragement) continued to embarrass Llywelyn, providing in this way one of occasions for the war of 1277.

    After the war of 1277, when Llywelyn was forced to cede his lands outside Gwynedd, Gruffydd was again given his lands back. Gruffydd became embroiled in an increasingly bitter dispute with Llywelyn over lands in Arwystli. Llywelyn wanted the issue resolved by Welsh law while Gruffydd wanted English law used and was supported by King Edward I.

    His forces mobilized during the Welsh War of 1282-1283 with those of John le Strange and Hugh le Despenser (both men being our ancestors), all supporting King Edward. It was their soldiers who ambushed and killed Llywelyn, the last native Prince of Wales, at Climeri near Builth in December 1282. His head was severed and paraded through the streets of London. To the Welsh he was known as ‘Llywelyn Ein Llyw Olaf’ - Llywelyn Our last Leader.

    After the Statute of Rhuddlan in 1284 all of the old princely titles in Wales ceased to exist. The realm of Powys Wenwynwyn became, almost entirely, the traditional county of Montgomeryshire.

    Gruffydd died some time between February 1286 and the end of 1287, and was succeeded by his eldest son Owain, also known later as Owen de la Pole.

    The ruling family of Powys did survive in the children and future descendants of Gruffydd ap Gwenwynwyn, henceforth known as the de la Pole family - meaning “of Poole” the old name for Welshpool, their defacto captial.

    Their descendants went on to play a major role in England as Earls of Suffolk.

    S7-28
    Gruffydd married c.1240/41:
    Hawise le Strange
    She was born c.1232 at Hunstanton, Norfolk and died 1310.

    Hawise was a leader in 1274 in the plot for the rebellion of Dafydd ap Gruffydd against Llywelyn II.
    Line 255-28, 255-29 & 255A-28
    Hawise was daughter of prominent Anglo-Norman Sir John le Strange* III Baron of Knockin, Shropshire (d.Mar.1269) and Lucy de Tregoz (d.1290), daughter of Robert de Tregoz I (d.c.1215) and Sybilla (Sibyl) de Ewyas (d.c.1236), daughter of Robert de Ewyas II (d.1198). (see More file M11 # 7 and Magna Carta Ancestry file MCA1A # 2)

    * The Le Strange family of Great Ness, Cheswardine and Knockin in Shropshire.
    John le Strange witnessed the treaty between Dafydd ap Gruffydd and Henry III in May 1240, was appointed in March 1241 to try Dafydd, and in Jan. 1245 was a commissioner to make peace with him.
    In the years 1244-5 John le Strange wrote to Henry III telling of Gruffydd’s support for the English cause; he aided the prince of Powys against Llywelyn in 1257, and Roger le Strange (d.1311), son of John, guarded the castle of Dolforwyn for Gruffydd, in whose support he wrote to Edward I claiming lands between the Rhiw and the Luggy rivers.
    Hawise, Gruffydd’s wife, was a leader in the plot for the rebellion of Dafydd against Llewelyn in 1274.
    In the late 13th century, numerous members of this family from Shropshire were active in the wars with the Welsh.
    ------------------------------------
    The le Strange family castle:
    Knockin Castle was situated in the village of Knockin in Shropshire between Oswestry and Shrewsbury. This was a motte and bailey castle (earth mound, topped by a wood or stone keep) founded by Guy le Strange (Lord L’Estrange, a younger son of the Duke of Bretagne) between 1154 and 1160 and remained the principal holding of the Strange family for most of the Middle Ages. The castle was damaged in the First Baron’s War during the reign of King John and was repaired by John le Strange. The castle was reported as being “ruinous”in 1540. All that remains now in a large tree-covered mound of earth.
    -------------------------------------
    Gruffydd was succeeded by his eldest son Owain, to whom the main inheritance passed, who was also known as Owen de la Pole*.

    Their children in our ancestry were Owain and Margred:
    1. Owain ap Gruffydd ap Gwenwynwyn (or Owen de la Pole) Prince of Upper Powys. He was born c.1257 in England and died c.1293)
    He married c.1280 Joan Corbet (b.1264/6), daughter of Sir Robert Corbet of Moreton Corbet in Shropshire and Catherine le Strange.

    S7-29
    Owen de la Pole was the heir presumptive to the Welsh principality of Powys Wenwywnwyn after the death of his father Gruffydd ap Gwenwynwyn in c.1287. He was born in England sometime after his father was driven into exile there in 1257 by Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, the ruler of the Kingdom of Gwynedd.

    It was during this exile that his father adopted the surname de la Pole meaning “of Poole” and referring to the old name for Welshpool which had become his family’s defacto captial. (see below “de la Pole family“) Owen and his father were implicated in an assassination attempt on the Prince of Wales in 1274. This led to Owen and his father fleeing to Shrewsbury where they both led border raids against the Principality of Wales on behalf of the English crown.
    Following Llywelyn’s defeat at the hands of King Edward I of England in 1277 Owen returned to Wales alongside his father whose lands had been restored. They soon became embroiled in a border dispute with Llywelyn which was one of the catalysts for a renewed campaign by the princes of Gwynedd against English domination. In 1284 following the final defeat of Gwynedd and the death of Llywelyn and his brother Dafydd ap Gruffydd the de la Pole family lost their princely pretentions and were referred to as only landowners of parts of north Wales.

    Owen’s father Gruffydd died around 1286 and the lands he held were divided between Owen and his younger brother Llywelyn ap Gruffydd ap Gwenwynwyn.
    --------------------------------
    * de la Pole family
    The descendants of Gruffydd ap Gwenwynwyn were called by the surname of “de la Pole”. This name meant “of Poole”, the old name for Welshpool, their defacto capital. This name change may have been to enable the family to adopt an Anglo-Norman name and discard their Welsh one when being Welsh was not fashionable in English society - nor safe. These descendants went on to play a major role in England as Earls of Suffolk. The following were Gruffydd’s descendants who were in our ancestry:
    - Owen de la Pole (ap Gruffydd) (d.1293) (see # 1 above)
    - Sir William de la Pole (the elder) (d.1329)
    He was the eldest son of Owen ap Gruffyd (alias Owen de la Pole) and was a merchant in Kingston-upon-Hull and Ravenser Odd.
    - Sir William de la Pole (the younger) (d.1366) was a wealthy merchant in Kingston-upon-Hull and Ravenser Odd, a royal moneylender and baron of Exchequer. De la Pole Avenue in Kingston-upon-Hull was named for him.
    - Lord Michael de la Pole, 1st Earl of Suffolk (d.1389)
    - Lord Michael de la Pole, 2nd Earl of Suffolk (d.1415)
    He was the last male de la Pole in our ancestry. His daughter Isabel was our ancestor.
    See file Skepper S4A-9, S4B-11 & Magna Carta Ancestry file MCA2-10ref.
    --------------------------------------
    2. Margred verch Gruffydd - married Sir Fulk Fitz Warin.
    They were our ancestors - see # 31 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    S7-30

    Line 74A-32 & 263-30
    31. Margred (Margaret) verch Gruffydd ap Gwenwynwyn
    She died on 11 May 1336

    She married before 25 Feb.1277:
    Sir Fulk Fitz Warin V Lord Fitz Warin
    He was born 14 Sept 1251 in Whittington, Shropshire and died 24 Nov. 1315.

    He was the first baron Fitz Warin and a Welsh Marcher lord.

    He was a son of Fulk Fitz Warin IV (d.1264) and Constance de Toeni (d.1266), daughter of Ralph de Toeni (d.1239) and Pernel de Lacy (d.1290). See More-Hastings file MH1F-6.
    -------------------
    Fitz Warin family:
    The Fitz Warin family were lords of Whittington and Alderbury (Salop/Shropshire) and Galveston (Gloucestershire). The lands in Shropshire were an area of dispute between the English and Welsh until the conquest of Wales in the late-13th century by King Edward I.
    The area around Whittington was held by Fulk Fitz Warin I (d.1170-1) and Fulk II (d.1197). Fulk III (d.1235) regained possession of Whittington in 1204 after having been outlawed.
    In 1217 Fulk aided Llywelyn the Great against the English, but made peace with the government of Henry III by Feb. 1218. Whittington was captured by Llywelyn at the start of 1223 and in 1226 Henry III met the lord of Gwynedd at Shrewsbury to discuss the trouble caused by Fulk Fitz Warin and other border barons.
    At the Battle of Lewes, 14 May 1264, Fulk IV was drowned while escaping from the battlefield; afterwards Simon de Montfort sought the aid of Llywelyn ap Gruffydd and one of the means of doing this was to grant to Llywelyn, on 22 June 1265, the service of the lord of Whittington; by the terms of the treaty of Montgomery, 29 Sept. 1267, this land passed to the Welsh. Fulk V was active in the wars against the Welsh at the end of the 13th century. He was ordered to aid Bere Castle, near Towyn, Mercia in 1294, with numerous demands being made upon him to find men from Shropshire for the king’s service.
    ---------------------------------------

    S7-31
    The Norman Fitz Warin family from page 56 of the 1848 book ‘The Roll of Battle Abbey’:
    Fitz-Waren. - This name seems to refer to the Fitz-Warines, who deduced from Guarine de Meez, a member of the House of Lorraine. Of this Guarine it is recorded that, having heard that William, a valiant knight, sister’s son to Pain Peverell, Lord of Whittington, in Shropshire, had two daughters, one of whom, Mallet, had resolved to marry none but a knight of great prowess; and that her father had appointed a meeting of noble young men, at Peverel’s Place, on the Peke, from which she was to select the most gallant, he came thither; when entering the lists with a son of the King of Scotland, and with a baron of Burgundy, he vanquished them both, and won the fair prize, with the Lordship and Castle of Whittington. At this place he subsequently took up his abode and founded the Abbey of Adderbury. The last male representative, Fulke, seventh Baron Fitz-Warine, died in minority, in 1429, leaving his dau. Elizabeth his heir.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    Line 74A-32
    32. Hawise Fitz Warin
    She was born c.1275 and died 2 Sept. 1344.

    She married (1st) c.1292:
    Sir Ralph de Goushill, Baron of Goxhill, of Goxhill in Lincolnshire.
    He was born c.1274 and died before 30 August 1294.

    He was a son of Sir Piers de Goushill, born c.1242 in Goxhill, Lincolnshire and died before 1 July 1286. He was a son of Sir Giles de Goushill, Sheriff of Lincoln (1267),
    (d. after 1269. Sir Giles de Goushill was Sheriff of York 1268/69, when the castle of York was committed to him. The wife of Piers was Ela de Camoys, born c.1244 in Hardingham, Norfolk. She was a daughter of Ralph de Camoys.

    They had a daughter Margaret de Goushill (see # 34).
    ----------------------------------------
    She married (2nd) Robert de Hoo (d.1286)
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    S7-32
    Line 74A-32
    * MCA # 276-612
    MCA # 54-275-276
    MCA # 701
    *MCA = Magna Carta Ancestry
    33. Margaret de Goushill
    She was born 12 May 1294, of Whittington, Shropshire and was baptized there.
    She died 29 July 1349.

    She was still under-age upon her (second) marriage to Sir John de Ros.

    She married (1st) c.1311:
    Sir Philip le Despenser
    He was of Parlington in Yorkshire and Alkborough in Lincolnshire, in the right of his wife, of Goxhill and Gedney also in Lincolnshire.
    He died 24 Sept. 1313.

    He was a son of Sir Hugh le Despenser the elder, Earl of Winchester, and Isabel de Beauchamp (d.c.1306). Hugh le Despenser was executed as a traitor 27 Oct. 1326.

    They had Sir Philip le Despenser, Knt. (see # 34 >>>>>>>)
    -------------------------------------
    Margaret married (2nd) c.1313/14:
    Sir John de Ros
    He was of Warren in Norfolk and was Steward of the Household and Admiral of the Fleet North of the Thames.
    He died shortly before 16 Nov. 1338.

    He was a son of Sir William de Ros Baron de Ros 1st Lord of Helmsley (d.1316) and Maud (d.1312), daughter and co-heiress of John de Vaux of Freiston in Lincolnshire and Walton in Norfolk. (see Magna Carta Ancestry files MCA6 # 4 & MCA12 # 4)
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    S7-33
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    For more on the following persons, see file Magna Carta Ancestry MCA10 # 7:
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    34. Sir Philip le Despenser married c.1339 Joan Cobham
    35. Sir Philip le Despenser married c.1360 Elizabeth ______
    36. Sir Philip Despenser married c.1385 Elizabeth de Tibetot
    37. Margery Despenser married c.1423 Roger Wentworth, Esq.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    For more on the following persons, see More file 1 # 10:
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    38. Philip Wentworth married c.1430-35 Mary Clifford
    39. Elizabeth Wentworth married c.1460 Sir Martin de la See
    40. Joan de la See married c.1490 Peter Hildyard, Esquire
    41. Isabel Hildyard married c.1520 Ralph Legard
    42. Joan Legard married 1550/1 Richard Skepper
    43. Edward Skepper married 1592 Mary Robinson
    44. Rev. William Skepper married 1638/9 Sarah Fisher
    45. Sarah Skepper married 1654 Walter Fairfield, Sr.
    46. Prudence Fairfield married c.1699 Lieutenant William Dodge
    47. Prudence Dodge married 1717/18 Josiah Dodge
    48. Josiah Dodge married 1739 Susannah Knowlton
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    For more on the following persons, see More file 1 # 31:
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    49. Josiah Dodge married 1761 Hannah Conant
    50. Mary Dodge married 1784 Cyrus Warner Sr.
    51. Miriam Warner married 1825 Foster Ketcham
    52. Milan Ketcham married 1981 Sarah Harper
    53. Ransom E. Ketcham married 1891 Nancy Jane Campbell
    54. Fay S. Ketcham married 1915 Halleck F. Gray
    55. Ruby J. Gray married 1935 Alton H. Rogers
    56. Alton E. Rogers married 1958 Yoshiko Takenaga
    57. Victoria C. Rogers married 1983 Lester L.T. Letoto

    S7-34
    Sources:
    - www.earlybritishkingdoms.com
    - www.robertsewell.ca/wales.html
    - www.geneajourney.com
    - www.genealogics.org
    - www.100welshheroes.com
    - www.ancientwalesstudies.org
    - http://yba.llgc.org.uk (The National Library of Wales - Dictionary of Welsh Biography)
    - http://en.wikipedia.org
    - Ancestral Roots of certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th edition) 2004 - (“Line” #s)
    - The Magna Carta Ancestry by Douglas Richardson 2005

    -------------------------------------

    Information on the Welsh naming process as provided by David Ford of the link www.earlybritishkingdoms.com:
    From his e-mail of 9/1/2007: “For a female “Ddu” (the Black) would usually refer to the colour of her hair. “ferch is the correct Welsh spelling of daughter, while “verch” is an English corruption based on the pronunciation of “ferch”.
    (For males,) “ap” us usual for son. “Ab” is used if the following father’s name begins with a vowel.”

    S7-35 A. Rogers aer437@yahoo.com




    Father: OWAIN OR ALDUD PRINCE OF TEGAINGL AP (L) EDWIN b: ABT 1044 in LLYS EDWIN, WALES
    Mother: MORWYL OR MORFYDD BENDEW VERCH (L) EDNYWAIN b: BET 1044 AND 1048 in TEGAINGL, WALES

    Marriage 1 GRUFFUDD GWYNEDD (NOTE) AP CYNAN KING (L) WALES b: BET 1054 AND 1055 in DUBLIN, IRELAND
    • Married: ABT 1095
    Children
    1. Has Children MARGRED VERCH (L) GRUFFUDD b: ABT 1080 in WALES
    2. Has Children RHANULLT VERCH (L) GRUFFYDD b: 1083 in CAERNARVONSHIRE, WALES
    3. Has Children SUSANNA (NOTES) VERCH (L) GRUFFYDD OR GRUFFUDD b: BET 1095 AND 1106 in CAERNARVONSHIRE, WALES
    4. Has Children CADWALADR AP (L) GRUFFUDD AP CYNAN b: ABT 1096 in CAERNARVONSHIRE, WALES
    5. Has Children OWAIN GWYNEDD (NOTES) AP GRUFFUDD OF (L) GWYNEDD b: BET 1087 AND 1104 in ABERFFRWA CASTLE, WALES
    6. Has Children GWENLLIAN II (NOTES) VERCH GRUFFYDD (L) GRUFFUDD b: BET 1086 AND 1090 in CAERNARVONSHIRE, WALES
  • We want to hear from you! Take our WorldConnect survey

    Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM

    Printer Friendly Version Printer Friendly Version Search Ancestry Search Ancestry Search WorldConnect Search WorldConnect Join Ancestry.com Today! Join Ancestry.com Today!

    WorldConnect Home | WorldConnect Global Search | WorldConnect Help
    We want to hear from you! Take our WorldConnect survey

    RootsWeb.com is NOT responsible for the content of the GEDCOMs uploaded through the WorldConnect Program. The creator of each GEDCOM is solely responsible for its content.