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  • ID: I102229
  • Name: Lucy Of Bolingbroke
  • Given Name: Lucy Of
  • Surname: Bolingbroke
  • Name: Lucy Malet
  • Given Name: Lucy
  • Surname: Malet
  • Name: *Lucy Mallett
  • Given Name: *Lucy
  • Surname: Mallett
  • Name: Lucia Of Mercia
  • Given Name: Lucia Of
  • Surname: Mercia
  • Name: Lucia Taillebois
  • Given Name: Lucia
  • Surname: Taillebois
  • Sex: F
  • Birth: Abt 1042 in Normandy, France
  • Note:
    Sources for this Information:
    parents: Thurold the Sheriff & dau William Malet [Ref: CP VII p746 (with corr in XIV p439)] Turold the Sheriff & dau William Malet [Ref: Keats-Rohan Lucy, Keats-Rohan Malet p53], father: Aelfgar Earl of Mercia or Thorold Sheriff of Lincoln [Ref: CP VII AppJ] Aelfgar Earl of Mercia, or Thorold Sheriff of Lincolnshire [Ref: Sanders Baronies p18(1)], mother: a daughter of William MALET [Ref: Kay Allen SGM 10/1/1998-143225]
    Sources with Inaccurate Information:
    parents: Aelfgar Earl of East Anglia (#11386) & Aelfgifu (#11387) [Ref: Watney WALLOP #589, Watney WALLOP #673], father: Aelfgar (#11386) according to forged charter of Peterborough [Ref: Kay Allen SGM 10/2/1998-103225]
  • Death: Abt 1136 1 2
  • Note:
    Sources for this Information:
    date: 1138 [Ref: Sanders Baronies p18] abt 1136 [Ref: Holloway WENTWORTH p5] living 1130 [Ref: Watney WALLOP #230, Weis AR7 #132A]
  • Event: Alt. Birth Spalding, Lincolnshire, England
  • Event: Alt. Birth Abt 1079 Mercia, England 3
  • Event: Alt. Death 1138 3
  • Occupation: Countess Of Chester
  • _UID: 044B176C3EA1400B9F4B4DEC46904DD315BD
  • Change Date: 30 Dec 2012 at 10:07
  • Note:
    AKA Lucia of Mercia

    Lucy (died c. 1138), sometimes called Lucy of Bolingbroke was an Anglo-Norman heiress in central England and, later in life, countess-consort of Chester. Probably descended partly from the old English earls of Mercia, she came to possess extensive lands in Lincolnshire which she passed on to her husbands and sons. She was a notable religious patron, founding or co-founding two small religious houses and endowing several with lands and churches.

    A charter of Crowland Abbey, now thought to be spurious, described Thorold of Bucknall, perhaps the same as her probable father Thorold of Lincoln, as a brother of Godgifu (Godiva), wife of Leofric, Earl of Mercia. The same charter contradicted itself on the matter, proceeding to style Godgifu's son (by Leofric), Ælfgar, as Thorold's cognatus (cousin). Another later source, from Coventry Abbey, made Lucy the sister of Earls Edwin and Morcar Leofricsson, while two other unreliable sources, the Chronicle of Abbot Ingmund of Crowland and the Peterbrough Chronicle also make Lucy the daughter of Earl Ælfgar.[3] Keats-Rohan's explanation for these accounts is that they were ill-informed and were confusing Lucy with William Malet's mother.

    Although there is much confusion about Lucy's ancestry in earlier writings, contemporary historians tend to believe that she was the daughter of Thorold, sheriff of Lincoln, by a daughter of William Malet (died 1071). It appears to be accepted however that Lucy was descended from Ælfgar, Earl of Mercia, even if the precise genealogy is not clear. This descent came either from Lucy's father or from William Malet's mother. She inherited an huge group of estates centred on Spalding in Lincolnshire, probably inherited from both the Lincoln and the Malet family. This group of estates have come to be called the "Honour of Bolingbroke.

    The heiress Lucy was married to three different husbands, all of whom died in her lifetime. The first of these was to Ivo Taillebois, a marriage which took place "around 1083". Ivo took over her lands as husband, and seems in addition to have been granted estates and extensive authority in Westmorland and Cumberland. Ivo died in 1094.

    The second marriage was to one Roger de Roumare or Roger fitz Gerold, with whom she had one son, William de Roumare (future Earl of Lincoln), who inherited some of her land. The latter was the ancestor of the de Roumare family of Westmorland. Roger died in either 1097 or 1098.

    Sometime after this, though before 1101, she was married to Ranulf le Meschin, her last and longest marriage. A son Ranulf de Gernon, succeeded his father to the earldom of Chester (which Ranulf acquired in 1121) and a daughter, Alice, married Richard de Clare.

    Upon her death, most of the Lincolnshire lands she inherited passed to her younger son William de Roumare, while the rest passed to Ranulf II of Chester (forty versus twenty knights' fees). The 1130 pipe roll informs us that Lucy had paid King Henry I 500 marks after her last husband's death for the right not to have to remarry. She died around 1138.

    Lucy, as widowed countess, founded the convent of Stixwould in 1135, becoming, in the words of one historian, "one of the few aristocratic women of the late eleventh and twelfth centuryes to achieve the role of independent lay founder". Her religious patronage however centered on Spalding Priory, a religious house for which her own family was the primary patron. This house (a monastic cell of Crowland) was founded, or re-founded, in 1085 by Lucy and her first husband Ivo Taillebois.

    Later, she was responsible for many endowments, for instance in the 1120s she and her third husband Earl Ranulf granted the priory the churches of Minting, Belchford and Scamblesby. In 1135, Lucy, now widowed for the last time, granted the priory her own manor of Spalding for the permanent use of the monks.[17] The records indicate that Lucy went to great effort to ensure that, after her own death, her sons would honour and uphold her gifts.
    (Wikipedia)

    Lucia, who had three husbands: (1) Ivo de Talbois, Earl of Angean; (2) Roger de Romara, Earl of Lincoln; (3) Randle de Meschines, Viscount Baieux in Normandy, Lord of Cumberland in England and afterwards Earl of Chester. (Through the 2nd marriage with the Earl of Lincoln this Earldom came down to her great-granddaughter Hawise, daughter of Hugh de Keveliock, Earl of Chester, who received the Earldom of Lincoln from her brother Ranulph, Earl of Chester, who died sine prole, and she married Robt. de Quincey, son of Saire de Quincey, Surety for the Magna Charta, and their daughter Margaret married John de Lacy, also Surety, and Hawise transferred the Earldom of Lincoln to John de Lacy, from whom you descend through Robert Abell and John Whitney.) Lucia, Countess of Chester and Lincoln, was sister to two great Earls, Edwine, Earl of Mercia, and Morcar, Earl of Northumberland, who stoutly opposed William, the Conqueror. Their sister Agatha, as stated above, was wife of Harold, who was slain by the Normans at Hastings.
    (Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 271)

    ----------------

    Lucy, living 1130, widow susscessively, of Ives Taillebois and Roger Fitz Gerold; m. probably c 1098 Ranulph III le Meschin. [Ancestral Roots]
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------- ----

    He [Ranulph le Meschin] married Lucy, widow of Roger FITZ-GEROLD (by whom she was mother of William de Roumare, afterwards Earl of Lincoln). He died 17 or 27 January 1128/9, and was buried at St. Werburg's, Chester. The Countess Lucy confirmed, as his widow, the grant of the Manor of Spalding to the monks of that place (f). [Complete Peerage III:166, XIV:170, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

    (f) She paid 500 marks to King Henry in 1130 for license to remain unmarried for 5 years.

    The following from www.linacre.ox.ac.uk/research/prosop/PRSPN2.stm, gives current research on the ancestry of Lucy:

    Antecessor Noster:
    The Parentage of the Countess Lucy Made Plain

    A lot of ink had flowed on the subject, but there can be no doubt that the 'mysterious' Countess Lucy of Chester was William Malet's thrice-married granddaughter, the daughter of Robert Malet's sister and Turold the Sheriff of Lincoln (dead by 1079). The suggestion was first made by R. Kirk in 1888. As N. Sumner has more recently observed: "This account has the merit of explaining why the lordship of Spalding and other places in Lincolnshire were held oafter Ivo's death not by Beatrice, his direct heir and the daughter of his marriage to Lucy, but by the later husbands of Lucy, Roger FitzGerold and Ranulph Meschines." It is clear from her charters that Lucy was an heiress; as was to be expected, her estates passed to the sons of her second and third marriages. Kirk's work was base upon conjecture, and contained a number of errors. The question of Lucy's parentage has therefore remained open. Nevertheless, there is proof that Kirk was right.

    A spurios charter of Crowland Abbey made Turold of Bucknall (The Sheriff) the founder of the priory of Spalding as a cell of Crowland. It also called Turold brother of Godiva countess of Mercia, but subsequently described Godiva's son Earl Algar as Turold's cognatus (cousin). A genealogia fundatoris of Coventry Abbey made Lucy a daughter of Earl Algar and sister and heiress of earls Edwin and Morcar. The Peterborought Chronicle and the Pseudo-Ingulf's Chronicle of Crowland both made Lucy the daughter of Algar and niece or great-niece of Turold. We know that William Malet was half-England, so these traditions probably boil down to a relationship between Countess Godiva and William's English mother.

    In 1153 a charter (RRAN, III, 180) of the future Henry II for Lucy's son Ranulf II of Chester referred to her uncles Robert Malet and Alan of Lincon. Alan of LIncoln was the successor, and almost certainly the son, of Domesday's Alfred of Lincoln. Chronologically, it is most unlikely that Alan was Lucy's uncle. It was probably another of Alfred's sons whom Domesday described as Alfred nepos [nephew or grandson] of Turold, then holding a fee which was certainly thereafter held with the rest of the senior Alfred's fee by his heir Alan. Domesday provides a further indication that Alfred senior married another of William Malet's daughters when it names a William as Alfred's predecessor in two of his manors. Other parts of each of these manors (Linwood and Rothwell) were held in 1086 by Durand Malet, who was probably William's son. It seems that Henry's charter can be explained by seeing a scribe, perhaps in search of rhetorical balance, commit the error of ascribing two uncles to Lucy, instead of a niece (Lucy) and a hephew (Alan of Lincoln) to Robert Malet, who was uncle to both.

    Turold is evidenced in Domesday Book as a benefactor of Crowland Abbey, to which he gave a parcel of land at Bucknall. The abbey also held land at Spalding that had probably been granted to it by Earl Algar and there is evidence to suggest that Turold the Sheriff gave further land there to the abbey of St Nicholas, Angers, before 1079. Lucy and her first husband Ivo Taillebois subsequently founded, or perhaps re-founded, a priory at Spalding subject to St Nicholas, Angers. A revealing phrase from the Register of Spalding Priory reads: 'mortuo quia dicto Thoraldo relicta sibi herede Lucia predicta' [at his death Turold left and heir, the aforesaid Lucy]. The word heres, 'heir' was often used of the child who was to inherit his/her father's property. Lucy later confirmed the gifts of all three of her husbands: 'pro redempcione anime patris mei et matris mee et dominorum meorum et parentum meorum' [for the souls of my father and mother, my husbands and my (other) relatives]. The association of the priory with such a small group of people and the description of Lucy as heres of Turold strongly hint at Lucy's parentage. But we can go further still.

    In their initial benefaction Ivo and Lucy referred to 'antecessorum suorum Turoldi scilicet uxorisque eius regine' [our 'ancestors' Turold and his wife]. The reference to Turold's wife indicated that some part of his landholding had come to him through his wife, something also indicated by the occurance of William Malet amongst those who had held the Domesday lands of Lucy's first husband Ivo Taillebois before him. The apparently vague Latin words antecessor and predicessor can both be used to mean something like 'predicessor'. Each of them conveys a range of bery precise meanings in different circumstances. The description of Turold and his wife as antecessores of Ivo and Lucy may be compared to the usage in a charter in the cartulary of Mont-Saint-Michel by which the Angevins Hugh Chalibot and his wife confirmed the grants of her father, who was described as antecessor noster. Other examples of this phrase show clearly that is was used by a married man to describe the parent from whom his wife had inherited the property she brought to the marriage. Acting on he own account (normally after her husband's death), the heiress will often describe herself as the daughter of the parent her husband described as antecessor noster. A rare use of the phrase was to indicate the couple's immediate predecessor, not her father but her brother. In Lucy and Ivo's case the plurality of their antecessores, Turold and his wife, puts the mater beyond doubt. Lucy's parents were inded Turold the Sheriff and a daughter of William Malet.

    K.S.B. Keats-Rohan
    Linacre College
    Oxford.

    _____________________________

    Ranulph de Meschines, Earl of Chester) m. Lucia, widow of Roger de Romara, Earl of Lincoln, and dau. of Algar, the Saxon, Earl of Mercia. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages,. Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 365, Meschines, Earls of Chester]

    ----------

    "...Stephen juggled his earldoms in 1140, transferring William of Albini to Sussex and making William de Roumare, Earl of Lincoln. William de Roumare was half brother to Ranulf, Earl of Chester, both sons of Lucy, who is thought to be the daughter of Thorold, sheriff and castellan of Lincoln Castle. William was the son of Lucy's second husband, Roger fitz Gerold, and Ranulf, the son of her third husband, Ranulf le Meschin, Earl of Chester." [Stephen and Matilda: The Civil War of 1139-53, Jim Bradbury, Alan Sutton Publishing Ltd., Great Britain, 1996]

    The seven Cistercian nunneries (fn. 1) of Lincolnshire were all founded in the twelfth century, and all but one during the first half of it; but it is hard to say which was actually the earliest, as none can be exactly dated. Perhaps the priory of Stixwould has as good a claim as any; it was founded by Lucy countess of Chester, (fn. 2) who could not possibly have lived far into the reign of Stephen, and may have endowed this house even under Henry I. Her son Ranulf, who died 1153, was also a benefactor of Stixwould, and so was Ralf FitzGilbert, the founder of Markby.

    1 A careful inspection of the episcopal registers and visitations has made it quite certain that all these were really of the Cistercian order, though Dugdale and Tanner could not speak certainly.
    2 See account of the priory of Spalding. Ranulf de Meschines, her last husband, died 1129.

    From: 'Houses of Cistercian nuns: The priory of Stixwould', A History of the County of Lincoln: Volume 2 (1906), pp. 146-49. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=38009. Date accessed: 24 September 2007.
    Note:
    Lucy, living 1130, widow susscessively, of Ives Taillebois and Roger Fitz Gerold; m. probably c 1098 Ranulph III le Meschin. [Ancestral Roots]
    - - - - ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    He [Ranulph le Meschin] married Lucy, widow of Roger FITZ-GEROLD (by whom she was mother of William de Roumare, afterwards Earl of Lincoln). He died 17 or 27 January 1128/9, and was buried at St. Werburg's, Chester. The Countess Lucy confirmed, as his widow, the grant of the Manor of Spalding to the monks of that place (f). [Complete Peerage III:166, XIV:170, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

    (f) She paid 500 marks to King Henry in 1130 for license to remain unmarried for 5 years.

    The following from www.linacre.ox.ac.uk/research/prosop/PRSPN2.stm, gives current research on the ancestry of Lucy:

    Antecessor Noster:
    The Parentage of the Countess Lucy Made Plain

    A lot of ink had flowed on the subject, but there can be no doubt that the 'mysterious' Countess Lucy of Chester was William Malet's thrice-married granddaughter, the daughter of Robert Malet's sister and Turold the Sheriff of Lincoln (dead by 1079). The suggestion was first made by R. Kirk in 1888. As N. Sumner has more recently observed: "This account has the merit of explaining why the lordship of Spalding and other places in Lincolnshire were held oafter Ivo's death not by Beatrice, his direct heir and the daughter of his marriage to Lucy, but by the later husbands of Lucy, Roger FitzGerold and Ranulph Meschines." It is clear from her charters that Lucy was an heiress; as was to be expected, her estates passed to the sons of her second and third marriages. Kirk's work was base upon conjecture, and contained a number of errors. The question of Lucy's parentage has therefore remained open. Nevertheless, there is proof that Kirk was right.

    A spurios charter of Crowland Abbey made Turold of Bucknall (The Sheriff) the founder of the priory of Spalding as a cell of Crowland. It also called Turold brother of Godiva countess of Mercia, but subsequently described Godiva's son Earl Algar as Turold's cognatus (cousin). A genealogia fundatoris of Coventry Abbey made Lucy a daughter of Earl Algar and sister and heiress of earls Edwin and Morcar. The Peterborought Chronicle and the Pseudo-Ingulf's Chronicle of Crowland both made Lucy the daughter of Algar and niece or great-niece of Turold. We know that William Malet was half-England, so these traditions probably boil down to a relationship between Countess Godiva and William's English mother.

    In 1153 a charter (RRAN, III, 180) of the future Henry II for Lucy's son Ranulf II of Chester referred to her uncles Robert Malet and Alan of Lincon. Alan of LIncoln was the successor, and almost certainly the son, of Domesday's Alfred of Lincoln. Chronologically, it is most unlikely that Alan was Lucy's uncle. It was probably another of Alfred's sons whom Domesday described as Alfred nepos [nephew or grandson] of Turold, then holding a fee which was certainly thereafter held with the rest of the senior Alfred's fee by his heir Alan. Domesday provides a further indication that Alfred senior married another of William Malet's daughters when it names a William as Alfred's predecessor in two of his manors. Other parts of each of these manors (Linwood and Rothwell) were held in 1086 by Durand Malet, who was probably William's son. It seems that Henry's charter can be explained by seeing a scribe, perhaps in search of rhetorical balance, commit the error of ascribing two uncles to Lucy, instead of a niece (Lucy) and a hephew (Alan of Lincoln) to Robert Malet, who was uncle to both.

    Turold is evidenced in Domesday Book as a benefactor of Crowland Abbey, to which he gave a parcel of land at Bucknall. The abbey also held land at Spalding that had probably been granted to it by Earl Algar and there is evidence to suggest that Turold the Sheriff gave further land there to the abbey of St Nicholas, Angers, before 1079. Lucy and her first husband Ivo Taillebois subsequently founded, or perhaps re-founded, a priory at Spalding subject to St Nicholas, Angers. A revealing phrase from the Register of Spalding Priory reads: 'mortuo quia dicto Thoraldo relicta sibi herede Lucia predicta' [at his death Turold left and heir, the aforesaid Lucy]. The word heres, 'heir' was often used of the child who was to inherit his/her father's property. Lucy later confirmed the gifts of all three of her husbands: 'pro redempcione anime patris mei et matris mee et dominorum meorum et parentum meorum' [for the souls of my father and mother, my husbands and my (other) relatives]. The association of the priory with such a small group of people and the description of Lucy as heres of Turold strongly hint at Lucy's parentage. But we can go further still.

    In their initial benefaction Ivo and Lucy referred to 'antecessorum suorum Turoldi scilicet uxorisque eius regine' [our 'ancestors' Turold and his wife]. The reference to Turold's wife indicated that some part of his landholding had come to him through his wife, something also indicated by the occurance of William Malet amongst those who had held the Domesday lands of Lucy's first husband Ivo Taillebois before him. The apparently vague Latin words antecessor and predicessor can both be used to mean something like 'predicessor'. Each of them conveys a range of bery precise meanings in different circumstances. The description of Turold and his wife as antecessores of Ivo and Lucy may be compared to the usage in a charter in the cartulary of Mont-Saint-Michel by which the Angevins Hugh Chalibot and his wife confirmed the grants of her father, who was described as antecessor noster. Other examples of this phrase show clearly that is was used by a married man to describe the parent from whom his wife had inherited the property she brought to the marriage. Acting on he own account (normally after her husband's death), the heiress will often describe herself as the daughter of the parent her husband described as antecessor noster. A rare use of the phrase was to indicate the couple's immediate predecessor, not her father but her brother. In Lucy and Ivo's case the plurality of their antecessores, Turold and his wife, puts the mater beyond doubt. Lucy's parents were inded Turold the Sheriff and a daughter of William Malet.

    K.S.B. Keats-Rohan
    Linacre College
    Oxford.

    _____________________________

    Ranulph de Meschines, Earl of Chester) m. Lucia, widow of Roger de Romara, Earl of Lincoln, and dau. of Algar, the Saxon, Earl of Mercia. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages,. Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 365, Meschines, Earls of Chester]

    ----------

    "...Stephen juggled his earldoms in 1140, transferring William of Albini to Sussex and making William de Roumare, Earl of Lincoln. William de Roumare was half brother to Ranulf, Earl of Chester, both sons of Lucy, who is thought to be the daughter of Thorold, sheriff and castellan of Lincoln Castle. William was the son of Lucy's second husband, Roger fitz Gerold, and Ranulf, the son of her third husband, Ranulf le Meschin, Earl of Chester." [Stephen and Matilda: The Civil War of 1139-53, Jim Bradbury, Alan Sutton Publishing Ltd., Great Britain, 1996]

    The seven Cistercian nunneries (fn. 1) of Lincolnshire were all founded in the twelfth century, and all but one during the first half of it; but it is hard to say which was actually the earliest, as none can be exactly dated. Perhaps the priory of Stixwould has as good a claim as any; it was founded by Lucy countess of Chester, (fn. 2) who could not possibly have lived far into the reign of Stephen, and may have endowed this house even under Henry I. Her son Ranulf, who died 1153, was also a benefactor of Stixwould, and so was Ralf FitzGilbert, the founder of Markby.

    1 A careful inspection of the episcopal registers and visitations has made it quite certain that all these were really of the Cistercian order, though Dugdale and Tanner could not speak certainly.
    2 See account of the priory of Spalding. Ranulf de Meschines, her last husband, died 1129.

    From: 'Houses of Cistercian nuns: The priory of Stixwould', A History of the County of Lincoln: Volume 2 (1906), pp. 146-49. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=38009. Date accessed: 24 September 2007.




    Father: Thorold Of Buckingham, Sheriff Of Lincoln b: 1015 in Coventry, Warwickshire, England
    Mother: Alvarissa Malet b: 1048 in Graville, St. Honorine, Normandy, France

    Marriage 1 Ranulph Briquessart De Meschines b: 1070 in Briquessart, Livry, France
    • Married: Abt 1098 3
    • Note:
      Sources for this Information:
      date: abt 1098 [Ref: Weis AR7 #132A] abt 1098, as third marriage of Lucy [Ref: Sanders Baronies p18] second marriage of Lucy [Ref: CP III p166] third marriage of Lucy [Ref: Weis AR7 #246B], child: [Ref: CP III p166, CP VII p677, Holloway WENTWORTH p5, Wagner PedigreeProgress #48, Watney WALLOP #230, Weis AR7 #125, Weis AR7 #132A, Weis AR7 #132D, Weis AR7 #246B]
    • Change Date: 13 Oct 2012
    Children
    1. Has Children Alice (Adeliza) De Meschines b: 1096 in Gernons Castle, Normandy
    2. Has Children William De Meschines b: Abt 1093 in Gernon Castle, , Normandy, France
    3. Has No Children Agnes De Meschines b: 1095 in Bayeux, Normandy, France
    4. Has Children Ranulph "De Gernon" De Meschines b: 1099 in Gernon Castle, Normandy, France

    Marriage 2 Ivo Tailebois b: 1036 in Cristot, Calvados, Normandy, France
    • Married: 0001
    • Note:
      Sources for this Information:
      date: first marriage of Lucy [Ref: Sanders Baronies p18, Weis AR7 #132A, Weis AR7 #246B], names: [Ref: Watney WALLOP #589, Watney WALLOP #673], child: [Ref: Raymond Phair SGM 8/9/1998-222730]
      Sources with Inaccurate Information:
      date: 1072 or 1073 according to forged charter of Peterborough [Ref: Kay Allen SGM 10/2/1998-103225], child: Ethred Baron of Kendal (#14729) [Ref: Watney WALLOP #589]
    • Change Date: 2 Sep 2011
    Children
    1. Has Children Beatrice
    2. Has Children Aelfred Taillebois b: in Anjou, France

    Marriage 3 Roger Fitz Gerold
    • Married: 0002
    • Note:
      Sources for this Information:
      date: first marriage of Lucy [Ref: CP III p166] secod marriage of Lucy [Ref: Weis AR7 #132A, Weis AR7 #246B] second marriage of Lucy [Ref: Sanders Baronies p18], names: brother of Robert fitz Gerold & Lucy [Ref: Sanders Baronies p17(8)], child: [Ref: CP III p166, CP VII p667, Sanders Baronies p17(8), Sanders Baronies p18]
    • Change Date: 2 Sep 2011
    Children
    1. Has Children William Seigneur Of Roumare, Earl Of Lincoln b: Abt 1096 in Roumare, Normandy, France

    Sources:
    1. Abbrev: Wikipedia
      Title: Wikipedia
    2. Abbrev: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
      Title: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    3. Abbrev: From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
      Title: From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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