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  • ID: I107585
  • Name: Charles Martel Of France
  • Given Name: Charles Martel
  • Surname: Of France
  • Prefix: King
  • Suffix: The Hammer, Mayor Of The Palace 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 689 in Heristal, Liege, Belgium 1 8 9 4 5 6 7
  • Note:
    Sources for this Information:
    date: (676) [Ref: ES I #2] 676/78 [Ref: Houdry CharlAnc] 689 [Ref: Weis AR7 #190] abt 675 [Ref: Moriarty Plantagenet p5, Moriarty Plantagenet p6, Moriarty Plantagenet p7] abt 690 [Ref: Don Stone SGM 6/22/1995-215501, Settipani Nobles p189], parents: [Ref: Don Stone SGM 6/22/1995-215501, ES I #2, ES I.1 #3, Houdry CharlAnc, Kelley Carolingians p111f, Moriarty Plantagenet p233, Moriarty Plantagenet p5, Settipani CharlAnc p22, Settipani CharlAnc p9, Wagner PedigreeProgress #30, Weis AR7 #190], father: [Ref: CMH p155, Settipani Nobles p189, Settipani Nobles p8, Watney WALLOP #207, exet0133 SGM 1/19/1996-174309], brother: Childebrand Duke of Provence [Ref: Settipani Capet p221]
    Sources with Inaccurate Information:
    mother: Aupais, sister of Pedto Duke of Cantabria and Cixila, widow of Argica King of Spain, not to be confused with Chalpaida (Elphide) third wife of Pepin who was daughter of the Meroingian prince Childebrand son of Chilperic son of King Caribert II [Ref: HughesRD Empire2Britain]
  • Death: 15 Oct 741 in Quierzy, Aisne, Picardie, France 1 8 9 4 5 6 7
  • Note:
    Sources for this Information:
    date: [Ref: Peter Stewart SGM 5/7/2005-013050] 741 [Ref: CMH p155, Don Stone SGM 6/22/1995-215501, Houdry CharlAnc, Moriarty Plantagenet p5, Moriarty Plantagenet p7, Settipani CharlAnc p9, Settipani Nobles p189, Watney WALLOP #207, Weis AR7 #190], place: [Ref: ES I.1 #3, Houdry CharlAnc]
    Sources with Inaccurate Information:
    date: 22 Oct 741 [Ref: ES I #2, ES I.1 #3, Moriarty Plantagenet p6, Settipani CharlAnc p19]
  • Burial: 22 Oct 741 St. Denis Monastery, Paris, Ville DE Paris, Ile-DE-France, France 4 5 6 7
  • Note:
    Sources for this Information:
    date: [Ref: Peter Stewart SGM 5/7/2005-013050], place: [Ref: ES I.1 #3]
    10
  • Event: Title (Facts Pg) Mayor Of The Palace Of Austrasia
  • _UID: 16964C4F51366449AE6ACA6F7EB5DA714A65
  • Change Date: 14 Mar 2013 at 11:29
  • Note:
    Charles Martel was born in 689 and is still famous, because, in the decisive battle of Tours in 732, he utterly routed the Moors who had conquered Spain and the south of France. He also fought King Chilperic II, the Merovingian King. He died in 741. His wife Rotrude (Rotrudis), died in 724. With her, he had:
    i. Carloman, Mayor of the Palace (741-747), who succeeded his father, but resigned his authority into his brother's hands. He was tired of fighting and entered a monastery. He was the father of Drogo, Mayor of the Palace (747-748).
    ii. Pepin (Pippin) II, the Short.
    iii. Grifo.
    Charles married a second time to Suanhilde, daughter of Grimaldo II and his wife Viletrude. T hey had a daughter, Landrade, who married Sigramine, Count of Hasbania. Their great granddaughter was Ermengarde, who married Louis I. the Debonaire.

    Known as "The Hammer," he was Mayor of the Palace and Frankish ruler; baptised by St. Rigobert, Bishop of Reims; ruled the Franks through Clothaire IV whom he made king of the Franks in name; consolidated his power in what is now France and laid the basis for the feudal system. "The characters of Charles Martel and his grandson Charlemagne offer many striking points of resemblance. Both were men of courage and activity, and the two men are often confused in the
    chansons de geste.'" Charles began the greatness of Austrasia...Frankish unity was re-established. He then defended Gaul against the Frisians, the Alamanni and the Bohemians. Charles proved himself another soldier of the cross by repelling the Moorish invasion at Poitiers (732). He reigned 714-741 and is buried at St. Denis.

    Charles Martel became Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia when his father, Pepin II, died in 714. That year he was imprisoned by his step-mother Plectudis, but escaped later in the year to lead the Austrasian and Neustrian nobles. The next year, the new King Chilperic II refused to act as a puppet to the nobles, and was backed by the Aquitaine duke Eudo, who was by then semi-independent from Frankish sovergnty. In 719, Charles defeated Eudo and took Chilperic hostage. Eudo's terms for mercy were that Chilperic would be recognized as sole ruler of the Franks, and the Charles would control all royal offices (i.e. as Mayor). Eudo had no other choice but to accept. In 720, Chilperic II died, Theuderic IV became king, Charles was stripped of his positions, Eudo was able to attain full independence, and Charles was preoccupied with pushing back Saxon invaders across the Rhine.

    The next year, Eudo defeated the advancing Moslem armies and made peace with them, however in 725 they attacked Septimania and invaded Burgundy, drawn by the wealth of the Catholic Church. In 731, the Spanish governor Abd ar-Rahman, much loved by the Moslem people, invaded and easily overran all of Aquitaine. The next year he took Poitiers and marched to Tours, where he was soundly beaten by Mayor Charles, and Rahman was killed in the battle. Three years later Eudo died, and Charles took supreme control of Gaul. In 737, Provence invited back the Moslems, who were defeated by Charles and his younger brother Hildebrand, then pushed out of Gaul forever. In 741, Charles died.

    RESEARCH NOTES:
    Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia [Ref: Weis AR7 #50, Weis AR7 #190, ES I.1 #3] Mayor of the Palace (Neustrie and Austrasie) [Ref: Houdry CharlAnc] Mayor of the Palace [Ref: Settipani CharlAnc p22] Duke of France [Ref: Settipani Capet #4, Houdry CharlAnc, Settipani Nobles p8]

    688-714: Mayor of the Palace [Ref: Settipani CharlAnc p22]

    717: Hausmier in Austrien [Ref: ES I.1 #3]

    717: Duke of France [Ref: Settipani Capet #4, Houdry CharlAnc, Settipani Nobles p8]

    717-741: Franks' Duke [Ref: Houdry CharlAnc]

    718: in Gesamtreich [Ref: ES I.1 #3]

    732: victor over the Saracens at Tours [Ref: Weis AR7 #50, Weis AR7 #190]

    halted the Muslim invasion of Europe at Poitiers [Ref: Don Stone SGM 6/22/1995-215501]

    in the decisive battle of Tours in 732, he utterly routed the Arabs who had conquered Spain and the south of France. [Ref: Wurts MCBarons p166]

    recorded in the same Metz annals as dying on 22 October ("XI kal. Novembris") in 741, but on 15 October ("Idibus Octobris") in the annals of Saint-Amand. Again, I suspect this is because the Metz annalist used the date of burial instead of actual death in recording his demise. [Ref: Peter Stewart SGM 5/7/2005-013050]

    ----- Europaische Stammtafeln I.1 #3 ("Die Arnulfinger - 751-771 Konige der Franken - und die Familie Pippin's des Alteren"): Karl Martell (martellus - Hammer) 717 hausmeier in Austrien, 718 im Gesamtreich d. Quierzy 22.X 741 u. Saint-Denis m1 Chrothrud d. before 725; m2 Swanahild illustrie matrona, urk 725/41, Nichte v Hz Odilo v Bayern (Agilolfinger); children: by I: Karlmann, Pipper der Jungere, Hiltrud, by II: Grifo, by NN: Bernhard, Hieronymis, Remedius [Ref: ES I.1 #3]
    KING OF FRANCE 689-741; MAJOR DOMO OF AUSTRASIA; VICTORIOUS OVER A LARGE ARMY OF SARACENS AT THE BATTLE OF TOURS, AND WAS THUS SURNAMED "MARTEL" (THE HAMMER)
    [jweber.ged]

    Victor over the Saracens at Tours, Poitiers.

    Carolingian ruler of the Frankish kingdom of Austrasia (in present northeastern France and southwestern Germany). Charles, whose surname means the hammer, was the son of Pepin of Herstal and the grandfather of Charlemagne. Pepin was mayor of the palace under the last kings of the Merovingian dynasty. When he died in 714, Charles, an illegitimate son, was imprisoned by his father's widow, but he escaped in 715 and was proclaimed mayor of the palace by the Austrasians. A war between Austrasia and the Frankish kingdom of Neustria (now part of France) followed, and at the end of it Charles became the undisputed ruler of all the Franks. Although he was engaged in wars against the Alamanni, Bavarians, and Saxons, his greatest achievements were against the Muslims from Spain, who invaded France in 732. Charles defeated them near Poitiers in a great battle in which the Muslim leader, Abd-ar-Rahman, the emir of Spain, was killed. The progress of Islam, which had filled all Christendom with alarm, was thus checked for a time. Charles drove the Muslims out of the Rhone valley in 739, when they had again advanced into France as far as Lyon, leaving them nothing of their possessions north of the Pyrenees beyond the Aude River. Charles died in Quierzy, on the Oise River, leaving the kingdom divided between his two sons, Carloman (circa 715-54) and Pepin the Short.

    SOURCES:
    Charles Martel (Andre Roux: Scrolls, 191.)

    (Paul, Nouveau Larousse Universel.)

    (Rosamond, Frankish kingdom under Carolingians.)

    (Stuart, Royalty for Commoners, Page 129, Line 171-43.)

    (Andre Castelot, Histoire de La France, Tome 1, Pages 271 - 273, 369).

    Born: in 686 in Chateau de Franchemont, Belgium, son of Pepin II d'Heristal and Aupais=Alpaide N? , The Chateau de Franchemont is near Spa and also Verviers, which may have encompassed Heristal. During World War II, the resistance used the tunnels under the castle to hide people and supplies from the German hordes.

    Married before 715: Rotrude=Chrotrud, Duchesse d'Austrasie , daughter of Saint Lievin=Leutwinus, Bishop de Treves and N. d'Istrie. Note - between 715 and 741: Toward the end of 715, Charles escaped from the prison his step-grandmother had locked him in, and rallies the Austrasians. In March, 716, however, in his first conflict with the Frisons who were edging their way up the Rhine, Charles is routed. A few weeks later, he is able to beat the Neustrians on the Ambeve River, near Malmedy. on 21 March 717, he is victorious over the Neustrians again, this time at Vincy, near Cambrai and he forces Chilperic II and his Mayor of the Palace, Rainfroi to flee to Paris. In 714, Charles takes the title Mayor of the Palace of Neustria, and gives the Neustrians a new King, Clotaire IV, son of Thierry III [who had died in 691] . The same year, his armies ravage Saxe all the way to the Weser River. In early 719, Clotaire IV died, and Rainfroi and Chilperic II obtain the assistance of Eudes, Duke of Aquitaine in a campaign against Charles. Charles defeats both armies; however, since Clotaire IV is dead, Charles recognizes Chilperic, but he becomes the Major Domus of both Neustria and Austrasia. When Chilperic II died in 721, Charles pulled Thierry IV, young adolescent son of Dagobert III, out of the Monastery of Chelles. from 722 to 724, the arabs mount successful offensives and pillage Autun. Charles, worried about maintaining the Franc authority, Charles Martel mounts a frightfully succesful campaign in Bavaria against the Allemanians and the Frisons, and he destroys their temples. Theutbald, Duke of the Allemanians is essentially powerless. In Gaule, toward the end of the decade, Charles turns his attention to Eudes, Duke of Aquitaine, who had maintained too independent an attitude. Aquitaine is ravaged in the process. In 730, Eudes allies himself with an Emir of northern Spain, Othmann ben Abi-Nessa and the arabs agin a foothold in southern France. By 732, a new emir, Adb-el-Rahman invades from Pampelona, cross the Pyrenees near Roncevaux, take and pillage Bordeaux, burning all the churches. In the Summer, they take Poitiers and destroy the basilica of Saint-Hilaire-hors-les-murs. On Saturday 17 October 732, Charles Martel's armies take the great Roman way linking Chatellerault to Poitiers and at 20 km North of Poitiers, at Moussais-la-Bataille, it encounters the arabs. They would observe each other for 7 days before the Battle of Poitiers would take place.

    The Battle of Poitiers: One Chronicler, Fredegaire described the action as follows: "Duke Eudes, being viewed with derision throughout his lands, called against Prince Charles and the nation of the Francs, that most perfidious race of the Sarrasins [that is not accurate as Eudes had first allied himself with an Emir, but then called upon Charles for aid when events turned on him] . The Sarrasins, led by their King, Abd-el-Rahman cross Gerona [another error as they set out from Pampelona and crossed the pyrenees at Roncevaux] . After having burned the churches, and crushed the population, they arrive in Poitiers. When they burn the Basilica and destroy the residence of Saint Martin, Prince Charles put into action an audacious plan and the order of Battle is given. With the aid of Jesus Christ, our Lord, our valorous Prince destroys their tents and flies into combat to crush them..."

    A less glorious account is given by a monk of the Abbey of Moissac:

    "The King of Spain, Abd-el-Rahman, having crossed the Pyrenees with his large army from Pampelona, laid siege to Bordeaux. Then Eudes, Prince of Aquitaine, leading his large assembled army fought against the Sarrasins on the banks of the Garonne. But, from the beginning, the Sarrasins were victorious. Eudes, having to flee, recruited the assistance of Charles, Prince of the Francs. Then Charles led his armies and combat ensued in the suburbs of Poitiers [the actual battle took place 20 km North of Poitiers] . The Sarrasins having been beaten by the Francs, and their King, Abd-el-Rahman killed, fled in a most disorderly manner back to Spain. As to Charles, he returned triumphantly to France with the bounty..."

    The Moslems have named that field of Battle: Balad-al-Shouhada -- Place of the Martyrs of the Faith. This victory gave Charles Martel extraordinary prestige, and it is there that he is said to have crushed the arabs "like a hammer". He then occupied the Bourgogne (Burgundy) and pacified the Languedoc, and Provence, thus establishing a significant French Monarchy. He exiled the family of Eucharic of Orleans, who controlled the bishopric of Auxerre, to Hesbaye, and installed his own man, Aimar to the Holy See. Married before 726: Sunnichild de Baviere. Buried: in Oct 741 in Saint Denis, Seine, Ile-de-France, France. Died: on 22 Oct 741 in Kiersy=Quierzy, Aisne, France, Upon Charles Martel's death, his two sons divide the Kingdom in accordance with his wishes. Carloman gets Austrasia, Allemania and Thuringia; Pepin gets Neustria, Burgundy and Provence. The rest, very little, went to Grifon, a bastard child of Charles by Swannhilde, grand-daughter of the Duke of the Bavarians.

    --------------- The First Carolingians The later Merovingian kings were a sorry lot who were uninterested in the details of governing. The office of Mayor of the Palace, whose initial duties were mostly domestic, gradually grew in power to become the most influential figure at the Frankish court. The mayors ruled the Franks in all essential points, and the Merovingians were mere figureheads. By the early 700s, this position had become hereditary in the house of Carolus (Charles). The first Mayor of significance was Charles Martel, who is usually credited with first raising the family to a position of prominence. He defeated a Muslim raiding party near Poitiers in 732; since this battle (sometimes erroneously called the Battle of Tours) marked the northernmost penetration of the Muslims into France, it has taken on a symbolic significance. Charles did not stem an invasion, he simply defeated a small army. But such victories helped establish him, rather than the king, as the leading power in the realm. Born about 688; died at Quierzy on the Oise, 21 October, 741. He was the natural son of Pepin of Herstal and a woman named AlpaïDe or ChalpaïDe. Pepin, who died in 714, had outlived his two legitimate sons, Drogon and Grimoald, and to Theodoald, a son of the latter and then only six years old, fell the burdensome inheritance of the French monarchy. Charles, who was then twenty-six, was not excluded from the succession on account of his birth, Theodoald himself being the son of a concubine, but through the influence of Plectrude, Theodoald's grandmother, who wished the power invested in her own descendants exclusively. To prevent any opposition from Charles she had him cast into prison and, having established herself at Cologne, assumed the guardianship of her grandson. But the different nations whom the strong hand of Pepin of Herstal had held in subjections, shook off the yoke of oppression as soon as they saw that it was with a woman they had to deal. Neustria gave the signal for revolt (715), Theodoald was beaten in the forest of Cuise and, led by Raginfrid, mayor of the palace, the enemy advanced as far as the Meuse. The Frisians flew to arms and, headed by their duke, Ratbod, destroyed the Christian mission and entered into a confederacy with the Neustrians. The Saxons came and devastated the country of the Hattuarians, and even in Austrasia there was a certain faction that chafed under the government of a woman and child. At this juncture Charles escaped from prison and put himself at the head of the national party of Austrasia. At first he was unfortunate. He was defeated by Ratbod near Cologne in 716, and the Neustrians forced Plectrude to acknowledge as king Chilperic, the son of Childeric II, having taken this Merovingian from the seclusion of the cloister, where he lived the name of Daniel. But Charles was quick to take revenge. He surprised and conquered the Neustrians at Amblève near Malmédy (716), defeated them a second time at Vincy near Cambrai (21 March, 717), and pursued them as far as Paris. Then retracing his steps, he came to Cologne and compelled Plectrude to surrender her power and turn over to him the wealth of his father, Pepin. In order to give his recently acquired authority a semblance of legitimacy, he proclaimed the Merovingian Clotaire IV King of Austrasia, reserving for himself the title of Mayor of the Palace. It was about this time that Charles banished Rigobert, the Bishop of Reims, who had opposed him, appointing in his stead the warlike and unpriestly Milon, who was already Archbishop of Trier. The ensuing years were full of strife. Eager to chastise the Saxons who had invaded Austrasia, Charles in the year 718 laid waste their country to the banks of the Weser. In 719 Ratbod died, and Charles seized Western Friesland without any great resistance on the part of the Frisians, who had taken possession of it on the death of Pepin. The Neustrians, always a menace, had joined forces with the people of Aquitaine, but Charles hacked their army to pieces at Soissons. After this defeat they realized the necessity of surrendering, and the death of King Clotaire IV, whom Charles had placed on the throne but two years previously, facilitated reconciliation of the two great fractions of the Frankish Empire. Charles acknowledged Chilperic as head of the entire monarchy, while on their side, the Neustrians and Aquitainians endorsed the authority of Charles; but, when Chilperic died, the following year (720) Charles appointed as his successor the son of Dagobert III, Thierry IV, who was still a minor, and who occupied the throne from 720 to 737. A second expedition against the Saxons in 720 and the definitive submission of Raginfrid, who had been left the county of Angers (724), re-established the Frankish Monarchy as it had been under Pepin of Herstal, and closed the first series of Charles Martel's struggles. The next six years were devoted almost exclusively to the confirming of the Frankish authority over the dependent Germanic tribes. In 725 and 728 Charles went into Bavaria, where the Agilolfing dukes had gradually rendered themselves independent, and re-established Frankish suzerainty. He also brought thence the Princess Suanehilde, who seems to have become his mistress. In 730 he marched against Lantfrid, Duke of the Alemanna, whom he likewise brought into subjection, and thus Southern Germany once more became part of the Frankish Empire, as had Northern Germany during the first years of the reign. But at the extremity of the empire a dreadful storm was gathering. For several years the Moslems of Spain had been threatening Gaul. Banished thence in 721 by Duke Eudes, they had returned in 725 and penetrated as far as Burgundy, where they had destroyed Autun. Duke Eudes, unable to resist them, at length contented himself by negotiating with them, and to Othmar, one of their chiefs, he gave the hand of his daughter But this compromising alliance brought him into disfavour with Charles, who defeated him in 731, and the death of Othmar that same year again left Eudes at the mercy of Moslem enterprise. In 732 Abd-er-Rahman, Governor of Spain, crossed the Pyrenees at the head of an immense army, overcame Duke Eudes, and advanced as far as the Loire, pillaging and burning as he went. In October, 732, Charles met Abd-er-Rahman outside of Tours and defeated and slew him in a battle (the Battle of Poitiers) which must ever remain one of the great events in the history of the world, as upon its issue depended whether Christian Civilization should continue or Islam prevail throughout Europe. It was this battle, it is said, that gave Charles his name, Martel (Tudites) "The Hammer", because of the merciless way in which he smote the enemy. The remainder of Charles Martel's reign was an uninterrupted series of triumphant combats. In 733-734 he suppressed the rebellion instigated by the Frisian duke, Bobo, who was slain in battle, and definitively subdued Friesland, which finally adopted Christianity. In 735, after the death of Eudes, Charles entered Aquitaine, quelled the revolt of Hatto and Hunold, sons of the deceased duke, and left the duchy to Hunold, to be held in fief (736). He then banished the Moslems from Arles and Avignon, defeated their army on the River Berre near Narbonne, and in 739 checked an uprising in Provence, the rebels being under the leadership of Maurontus. So great was Charles' power during the last years of his reign that he did not take the trouble to appoint a successor to King Thierry IV, who died in 737, but assumed full authority himself, governing without legal right. About a year before Charles died, Pope Gregory III, threatened by Luitprand, King of Lombardy, asked his help. Now Charles was Luitprand's ally because the latter had promised to assist him in the late war against the Moslems of Provence, and, moreover, the Frankish king may have already suffered from the malady that was to carry him offÙvtwo reasons that are surely sufficient to account for the fact that the pope's envoys departed without gaining the object of their errand. However, it would seem that, according to the terms of a public act published by Charlemagne, Charles had, at least in principle, agreed to defend the area.

    Carolingian ruler of the Frankish kingdom of Austrasia (in present northeastern France and southwestern Germany). Charles, whose surname means "the hammer," was the son of Pepin of Herstal and the grandfather of Charlemagne. Pepin was mayor of the palace under the last kings of the Merovingian dynasty. When he died in 714, Charles, an illegitimate son, was imprisoned by his father's widow, but he escaped in 715 and was proclaimed mayor of the palace by the Austrasians. A war between Austrasia and the Frankish kingdom of Neustria (now part of France) followed, and at the end of it Charles became the undisputed ruler of all the Franks. Although he was engaged in wars against the Alamanni, Bavarians, and Saxons, his greatest achievements were against the Muslims from Spain, who invaded France in 732. Charles defeated them near Poitiers in a great battle in which the Muslim leader, Abd-ar-Rahman, the emir of Spain, was killed. The progress of Islam, which had filled all Christendom with alarm, was thus checked for a time. Charles drove the Muslims out of the Rhône valley in 739, when they had again advanced into France as far as Lyon, leaving them nothing of their possessions north of the Pyrenees beyond the Aude River. Charles died in Quierzy, on the Oise River, leaving the kingdom divided between his two sons, Carloman and Pepin the Short. "Charles Martel," Microsoft (R) Encarta. Copyright (c) 1994 Microsoft Corporation. Copyright (c) 1994 Funk & Wagnall's CorporationName Suffix:<NSFX> Mayor Of The Palace Of Austrasia

    Sources: RC 114, 171, 269, 352; A. Roots 50, 190, 191; Collins;Carolingian Ancestry; AF.RC: Charles (Karl) Martel "the Hammer" of Heristol, Leige, Belgium.Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia. King of the Franks, 724. Victor at theBattle of Poitiers.

    Roots: Charles Martel, Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia, victor over the Saracens at Tours, 732. Born 689, died 741.

    Collins: Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia 719-741,Carolingian: Charles Martel,King of the Franks, died 74
    1. No wife listed.

    Charles 'Martel', Mayor Of The Palace Of Austrasia ruled the Merovingian Franks from A.D. 719 to 741. He used only the title of Mayor of the Palace, but he actually had the power of a king. Most of the lawful Frankish kings of this period were weak. In 732, Charles defeated the invading Moslems in the famous Battle of Tours near Poitiers. For repeatedly attacking the Moslems, Charles later received the title of Martel, meaning the Hammer. He built an army of mounted men by seizing church estates. Charles supported Saint Boniface in his reform of the Frankish church.
    Source: 'The World Book Encyclopedia', 1968, C295. 'Royalty for Commoners', Roderick W. Stuart, 1993, p 129, 196. 'Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants', Langston & Buck, 1986, p cvi.

    'Charles Martel'\\ was born August 23, 676 in Heristal, Alsace, France and died on October 22, 741. He was Mayor of the Palace of the kingdom of the Franks.

    Martel is best remembered for winning the Battle of Tours (more correctly the Battle of Poitiers) in 732, which has been characterized as the salvation of Europe from the Arab menace. Martel's Frankish army defeated an Arab army fighting to spread Islam, which had swept through southern Asia and north Africa, before conquering most of the Iberian peninsula and much of southern France.

    Although it took another two generations for the Franks to drive all the Arab garrisons out of what is now France and across the Pyrenees. Charles Martel's halt of the invasion of French soil turned the tide of Islamic advance, and the unification of the Frankish kingdom under Charles Martel, his son Pippin the Short, and his grandson Charlemagne prevented the Ummayad kingdom from expanding over the Pyrenees.

    Charles Martel (Martel means "the Hammer") was the son of Pippin of Herstal, Massachusettsyor of the Palace of Austrasia, and his concubine Alpaida. On Pippin's death in 714, the succession passed to an infant grandson, Theodoald. The faction of Austrasian nobles who supported Theodoald was led by his stepmother, Pippin's widow, Plectrude. Charles, who was already an adult, led a rival faction and prevailed in a series of battles against both invading Neustrian Franks and the forces of Plectrude. Between 718 and 723, Charles secured his power through a series of victories and by winning the loyalty of several important clerics. This he accomplished in part by donating lands and money for the foundations of abbeys such as Echternach.

    In the subsequent decade, Charles led the Frankish army against the eastern duchies, Bavaria and Alemannia, and the southern duchies, Aquitaine and Provence (in Avignon, N?s, Montfrin (736),...). He dealt with the ongoing conflict with the Saxons to his northeast with some success, but full conquest of the Saxons and their incorporation into the Frankish empire would wait for his grandson Charlemagne.

    Charles Martel's wives were (1) Chrotrud or Rotrude (690-724) (mother of Pippin and Carloman), and (2) Swanachild.

    Charles Martel died on October 22, 741, at Quierzy in what is today the Aisne d?rtement in the Picardy region of France. He was interred at Saint Denis Basilica in Paris, France. He was succeeded by his sons, Carloman, Pippin the Short, and Grifo.




    Father: Pepin Of Heristal b: 635 in Heristal, Liege, Belgium
    Mother: Aupais Chalpaide De Heathers de Bruyeres b: 654 in Heristal, Liege, Belgium

    Marriage 1 Lady Bothrude (Rotrude) Of Treves b: Abt 690 in Treves, Rhone, Rhone-Alpes, France
    • Married: Abt 713 in 1st Wife 4
    • Note:
      Sources for this Information:
      date: first marriage of Charles [Ref: ES I #2, Settipani Capet #4, Weis AR7 #190], names: [Ref: Moriarty Plantagenet p6, Settipani CharlAnc p20, Stewart Baldwin SGM 7/21/1997-150619] Charles Martel & (?) Rotrude [Ref: Settipani CharlAnc p11] Charles Martel & Chrotrudis [Ref: Settipani Capet #4, Wagner PedigreeProgress #30] Karl (Martel) & Chrotrud [Ref: ES I #2], child: [Ref: Don Stone SGM 6/22/1995-215501, ES I #2, ES I.1 #3, Houdry CharlAnc, Kelley Carolingians p111f, Moriarty Plantagenet p215, Moriarty Plantagenet p5, Moriarty Plantagenet p7, Settipani Capet #4, Settipani CharlAdd90, Settipani CharlAnc p18, Wagner PedigreeProgress #30, Watney WALLOP #207, Weis AR7 #190, Weis AR7 #191, Weis AR7 #50]
    • Change Date: 13 Mar 2013
    Children
    1. Has Children Landree (Landrade) Of Hesbaye b: 714
    2. Has Children Carloman I King Of The Franks b: 713 in Austrasia, Flanders Now Belgium
    3. Has Children Pepin III King Of The Franks b: 714 in Jupille, Austrasia
    4. Has Children Bernard Duke Of Franks b: Abt 720 in Austrasia, France
    5. Has Children Alda
    6. Has Children Auda (Aldane) Martel b: Bef 724 in Heristal, Liege, Belgium
    7. Has Children Hiltrudis b: 720

    Marriage 2 Sonichilde (Swanhilda) (Suanhilde) von Bavaria b: Abt 710 in Bavaria, Germany
    • Married: Concubine in No Marriage NOT_MARRIED 4
    • Note:
      Sources for this Information:
      date: [Ref: ES I.1 #3], names: Karl Martel & aus der Verbindung mit NN [Ref: ES I.1 #3], child: [Ref: ES I #2, ES I.1 #3, Moriarty Plantagenet p20, Settipani Capet p362, Settipani Nobles p8]
    • Change Date: 9 Jan 2013
    Children
    1. Has No Children Grifo D'austrasie (Comte Du Maine) (Duke Of Bavaria) Of Bavaria b: 726 in Austrasia
    2. Has Children Hiltrudis
    3. Has No Children Miss Martel b: Abt 735
    4. Has Children Hieronymus b: Abt 725
    5. Has Children Bernard D'heristal b: 730 in Belgium
    6. Has No Children Hardeloga b: 732 in Austrasia
    7. Has Children Olba
    8. Has Children (Daughter) Of Charles Martel b: 735

    Marriage 3 Chrothais
    • Married: 0002
    • Note:
      Sources for this Information:
      date: not shown as a marriage of Karl Martel, mother of Bernhard NN [Ref: ES I.1 #3] second marraige of Charles [Ref: Settipani Capet #4, Settipani Capet p171], names: [Ref: Settipani CharlAdd2000], child: [Ref: Settipani Capet #4]
    • Change Date: 13 Oct 2012

    Sources:
    1. Abbrev: Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on
      Title: Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on
      Page: Charles Martel
      Quality: 3
    2. Abbrev: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
      Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
      Page: 8
      Quality: 3
    3. Abbrev: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
      Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
      Page: 50-11, 190-11
      Quality: 3
    4. Abbrev: jweber.ged
      Title: jweber.ged
      Repository:
        Name: Not Given

      Text: Date of Import: 10 Jan 2005
    5. Abbrev: jweber.ged
      Title: jweber.ged
      Repository:
        Name: Not Given

      Text: Date of Import: 11 Jan 2005
    6. Abbrev: jweber.ged
      Title: jweber.ged
      Repository:
        Name: Not Given

      Text: Date of Import: 12 Jan 2005
    7. Abbrev: jweber.ged
      Title: jweber.ged
      Repository:
        Name: Not Given

      Text: Date of Import: 24 Jan 2005
    8. Abbrev: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
      Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
    9. Abbrev: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
      Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
      Page: 190-11
      Quality: 3
    10. Abbrev: Joseph H. Kare Jr.
      Title: Joseph H. Kare Jr.
      Note: Joekare@hotmail.com
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