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  • ID: I130969
  • Name: Elizabeth Lucy Wydville
  • Given Name: Elizabeth Lucy
  • Surname: Wydville
  • Sex: F
  • Birth: 1437 in Grafton Regis, Northamptonshire, England
  • Note:
    Sources for this Information:
    date: (1437) [Ref: ES II #86] 1437 [Ref: Louda RoyalFamEurope #4, Thompson CharlesII #143] abt 1437 [Ref: Paget HRHCharles p200, Paget HRHCharles p29, Paget HRHCharles p85], parents: [Ref: ES II #86, Paget HRHCharles p200, Paget HRHCharles p27, Paget HRHCharles p29, Paget HRHCharles p85, Thompson CharlesII #143], father: [Ref: CP III p440 (with corr in XIV p208), CP IV p330 (with corr in XIV p260), CP IV p418, Louda RoyalFamEurope #4, Louda RoyalFamEurope #5, Watney WALLOP #9, Weis MC #161]
  • Death: 7 Jun 1492 in St Saviour's Abbey, Bermondsey, Surrey, England
  • Note:
    Sources for this Information:
    date: [Ref: ES II #86, Paget HRHCharles p200, Paget HRHCharles p29, Paget HRHCharles p85, Watney WALLOP #9] 10 Jun 1492 [Ref: Weis MC #161] 1492 [Ref: CMH p892, Louda RoyalFamEurope #4, Louda RoyalFamEurope #5, Thompson CharlesII #143], place: [Ref: Paget HRHCharles p29]
  • Burial: 12 Jun 1492 St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, Berkshire, England
  • _UID: 9355F82044CD4494986E2FBAE93505847F85
  • Change Date: 12 Mar 2013 at 14:24
  • Note:
    Elizabeth Woodville - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: "Elizabeth Woodville was the queen-consort of King Edward IV of England 1464-1483.

    She was born in about 1437 to Sir Richard Woodville (or Wydeville) and Jacquetta of Luxembourg. In about 1452, she married Sir John Grey, who was killed at the Battle of St. Albans in 1461, fighting for the Lancastrian cause. (This was ironic, as Edward IV was the Yorkist claimant to the throne.) Elizabeth had two sons from the marriage, Thomas (later Marquess of Dorset) and Richard.

    Edward had many mistresses, the most notorious being Jane Shore, but Elizabeth insisted on marriage, which took place secretly (from the public but not from their family and friends) on May 1, 1464, at her family home in Northamptonshire. At the time, Edward's adviser, the Earl of Warwick was negotiating a marriage alliance with France. When the marriage to Elizabeth Woodville became common knowledge, it was the cause of considerable rancor on Warwick's part, and when Elizabeth's relatives, especially her brother, Earl Rivers, began to be favored over him, he changed sides. (Nor was Warwick the only one who resented the way the queen's relatives scooped up favors and lucrative opportunities; in 1480, for example, when Elizabeth's obscure brother-in-law Sir Anthony Grey died, he was interred in St. Albans Cathedral with a brass marker to rival the one for that abbey's greatest archbishop. That was nothing compared to the marriages the queen arranged for her family, the most outrageous being when her 20-year-old brother John Woodville married the dowager Duchess of Norfolk, widowed three times and nearly 80 but very, very wealthy. The queen also married her 24-year-old sister Katherine (or Catherine) Woodville to Elizabeth's 12-year-old ward Henry Stafford, Duke of Buckingham, who was quite wealthy already, too.)

    Elizabeth and Edward's marriage had produced ten children, including two sons who were still living at the time of the king's sudden death in 1483. The elder, Edward, had been born in sanctuary at Westminster Abbey in 1470, during the period when Edward IV was out of power during the Wars of the Roses. Elizabeth now, briefly, became Queen Mother, but on June 25, 1483, her marriage was declared null and void by Parliament, on the grounds that Edward had previously promised to marry Lady Eleanor Talbot Butler, which was considered a legally binding contract that rendered any other marriage contract invalid as bigamous. (Eleanor Talbot had done the same thing Elizabeth Woodville did later: a widow who caught Edward's eye, she refused to give in to him until he promised to marry her.) This information came to the fore when Robert Stillington, Bishop of Bath and Wells, testified that he had carried out the ceremony. On the basis of his evidence, all Elizabeth's children by Edward, including Edward V of England, were declared illegitimate, and her brother-in-law, Richard III of England, accepted the crown and kept the two princes in the Tower of London, where they had already been lodged to await the coronation. Elizabeth and her other children were in sanctuary again, fearing for their safety. This may have been to protect themselves against jealous courtiers who wanted their own back on the entire Woodville clan.

    Elizabeth then conspired with Lancastrians, promising to marry her eldest daughter, Elizabeth of York, to the Lancastrian claimant to the throne, Henry Tudor (later Henry VII of England) if he could supplant Richard. Following Henry's accession in 1485, Elizabeth Woodville's children by Edward IV were once again legitimised (because Henry wanted his wife to be the Yorkist heir to the throne, to cement his hold on it). The former Queen Elizabeth Woodville, now simply Dame Elizabeth Grey again, died on June 8, 1492 at Bermondsey in London and was buried in the same chantry as her husband King Edward in St. George's Chapel in Windsor."

    Elizabeth, buried 10 June 1492, widow of Sir John Grey of Groby, daughter of Sir Richard Wydville. [Magna Charta Sureties]

    RESEARCH NOTES:
    sister and coheir of Richard, 3rd Earl Rivers [Ref: CP V p361 (with corr in XIV p321)]

    Elizabeth Wydeville

    QUEEN OF ENGLAND

    Queen consort
    She was the Queen consort of King Edward IV of England from 1464 until his death in 1483.
    She was a maid of honor to Margaret of Anjou, Queen of Henry VI. In about 1452, she married Sir John Grey, 2nd Baron Ferrers of Groby, who was killed at the Second Battle of St Albans in 1461, fighting for the Lancastrian cause. (This was ironic, as Edward IV was the Yorkist claimant to the throne.) Elizabeth had two sons from the marriage, Thomas (later Marquess of Dorset) and Richard.


    Edward IV had many mistresses, the most notorious being Jane Shore, but Elizabeth insisted on marriage, which took place secretly (from the public but not from their family and friends) on May 1, 1464, at her family home in Northamptonshire.

    At the time, Edward's adviser, Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, was negotiating a marriage alliance with France. When the marriage to Elizabeth Woodville became common knowledge, it was the cause of considerable rancour on Warwick's part, and when Elizabeth's relatives, especially her brother, Earl Rivers, began to be favored over him, he changed sides.


    Nor was Warwick the only one who resented the way the queen's relatives scooped up favours and lucrative opportunities; in 1480, for example, when Elizabeth's obscure brother-in-law Sir Anthony Grey died, he was interred in St Albans Cathedral with a brass marker to rival the one for that abbey's greatest archbishop. That was nothing compared to the marriages the queen arranged for her family, the most outrageous being when her 20-year-old brother John Woodville married Lady Katherine Neville, daughter of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland by Joan Beaufort, widow of John Mowbray, 2nd Duke of Norfolk and dowager Duchess of Norfolk. Katherine had been widowed three times and was nearly 80 years old but very wealthy. The queen also married her sister, Catherine Woodville, to her 11-year-old ward Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham.

    Elizabeth and Edward's marriage had produced ten children, including two sons who were still living at the time of the king's sudden death in 1483. The elder, Edward, had been born in sanctuary at Westminster Abbey in 1470, during the period when Edward IV was out of power during the Wars of the Roses. Elizabeth now, briefly, became Queen Mother, but on June 25, 1483, her marriage was declared null and void by Parliament in the act Titulus Regius on the grounds that Edward had previously promised to marry Lady Eleanor Butler, which was considered a legally binding contract that rendered any other marriage contract invalid as bigamous.

    (It was said that Eleanor Talbot had done the same thing Elizabeth Woodville did later: A widow who caught Edward's eye, she refused to give in to him until he promised to marry her.) This information came to the fore when a priest (believed to be Robert Stillington, Bishop of Bath and Wells), testified that he had carried out the ceremony.

    On the basis of his evidence, all Elizabeth's children by Edward, including King Edward V, were declared illegitimate, and her brother-in-law, Richard III, accepted the crown and kept the two princes in the Tower of London, where they had already been lodged to await the coronation. The exact fate of the so-called Princes in the Tower is unknown but both were dead in this or the next reign. Elizabeth now lost the title of Queen Mother and was called The Dame Elizabeth Grey. She and her other children were in sanctuary again, fearing for their safety. This may have been to protect themselves against jealous courtiers who wanted their own back on the entire Woodville clan.

    Elizabeth then conspired with Lancastrians, promising to marry her eldest daughter, Elizabeth of York, to the Lancastrian claimant to the throne, Henry Tudor (later King Henry VII), if he could supplant Richard. Following Henry's accession in 1485, Elizabeth Woodville's marriage Edward IV was declared to have been valid, and thus their children were once again legitimised (because Henry wanted his wife to be the Yorkist heir to the throne, to cement his hold on it). At this point, Elizabeth was accorded the title of Queen Dowager. She died on June 8, at Bermondsey in London and was buried on June 12 in the same chantry as her husband King Edward in St George's Chapel in Windsor Castle.
    (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

    Source:

    R. C. Karnes, Rootsweb.com
    Updated January 2008

    ***
    Elizabeth Wydeville was born circa 1437.1,5 She was the daughter of Richard Wydeville, 1st Earl Rivers and Jacqueline, Duchess of Bedford.1,2,3 She married Edward IV, "of Rouen," King of England, son of Richard, Duke of York and Cecily "the Rose of Raby", on 1 May 1464 in Grafton Regis, Northamptonshire, England.1,6 She died on 7 June 1492 in Bermondsey Abbey, England.

    Citations

    1. [S592] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings and Queens (7 Kensington Road Church Court, London W8 4SP: Robinson Publishing Ltd., 1998), [O17]. Hereinafter cited as Ashley, M..
    2. [S1397] Marlyn Lewis, compiler, The Ancestry of Elizabeth of York (PO BOX 1401, Arvada, CO 80001: HT Communications, 1999), 6. Hereinafter cited as AEY.
    3. [S1397] Marlyn Lewis, AEY, 7.
    4. [S1442] Heraldry Unlimited, online http://www.heraldryunlimited.com/, Ambitious Queens. Hereinafter cited as Heraldry Unlimited.
    5. [S1397] Marlyn Lewis, AEY, 3.
    6. [S862] Various Encyclopędia Britannica 2001 Standard Edition CD-ROM (U.S.A.: Britannica.com Inc.
    , 1994-2000), Rivers, Richard Woodville, 1st Earl, Baron Rivers (Eng. noble). Hereinafter cited as EB CD 2001.
    7. [S592] Mike Ashley, Ashley, M., [O18].
    8. [S1030] Archivist to the Dean and Canons of Windsor Grace Holmes, The Order of the Garter: It's Knights and Stall Plates 1348 to 1984 (Windsor, England: Oxley & Sons (Windsor) Ltd., 1984, reprinted 1999), pg. 96. Hereinafter cited as Order of the Garter.




    Father: Richard Wydeville b: 1405 in La Mote, Maidstone, Kent, England
    Mother: Jacquetta De Luxemburg b: 1416 in St Pol, Artois/Pas-de-Calais, France

    Marriage 1 Edward IV Of England b: 28 Apr 1442 in Rouen, Seine-Inferieure, Normandy, France
    • Married: 1 May 1464 in Grafton Regis, Northamptonshire
    • Note:
      Sources for this Information:
      date: [Ref: ES II #86, Paget HRHCharles p200, Paget HRHCharles p29, Paget HRHCharles p85, Watney WALLOP #9, Weis MC #161] 1464 [Ref: Louda RoyalFamEurope #4, Louda RoyalFamEurope #5] second marriage of Elizabeth [Ref: CMH p892, CP IV p418], place: [Ref: Paget HRHCharles p29, Weis MC #161], names: [Ref: Thompson CharlesII #142], child: [Ref: CMH p892, CP III p440, CP IV p330, ES II #86, Louda RoyalFamEurope #4, Louda RoyalFamEurope #5, Louda RoyalFamEurope #6, Paget HRHCharles p29, Paget HRHCharles p31, Paget HRHCharles p86, Thompson CharlesII #71, Watney WALLOP #9, Weis MC #161]
    • Change Date: 12 Mar 2013
    Children
    1. Has Children Elizabeth Plantagenet b: 11 Feb 1465 in Westminster
    2. Has No Children Mary Plantagenet b: Aug 1467 in Windsor
    3. Has Children Cicely Plantagenet b: 20 Mar 1469
    4. Has No Children Edward V King Of England b: 4 Nov 1470 in Sanctuary At Westminster
    5. Has No Children Margaret Plantagenet b: 10 Apr 1472 in Windsor
    6. Has No Children Richard Plantagenet, Duke Of Norfolk b: 17 Aug 1473 in Shrewsbury
    7. Has Children Anne Plantagenet b: 2 Nov 1475 in Westminster
    8. Has No Children George Plantagenet, Duke Of Bedford b: Mar 1476/7 in Windsor
    9. Has Children Catherine Plantagenet b: Abt 14 Aug 1479 in Eltham, Kent
    10. Has No Children Bridget Plantagenet b: 10 Nov 1480 in Eltham

    Marriage 2 John Grey
    • Married: Abt 1455
    • Note:
      Sources for this Information:
      date: abt 1455 [Ref: CP V p361 (with corr in XIV p321)] first marriage of Elizabeth [Ref: Roberts USPres p200], child: [Ref: CP IV p418, CP V p361(ba) (with corr in XIV p321), Roberts USPres p200]
    • Change Date: 9 Nov 2009
    Children
    1. Has Children Thomas Grey b: 1451
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