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  • ID: I160237
  • Name: Roger De Mortimer
  • Given Name: Roger
  • Surname: De Mortimer
  • Prefix: Sir
  • Suffix: Ist Earl Of March 1
  • Name: More -->
  • Given Name: More -->
  • Surname:
  • Name: Roger De Mortimer
  • Given Name: Roger
  • Surname: De Mortimer
  • Suffix: (2+)
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 25 Apr 1287 in Netherwood, Thornbury, Herefordshire, England 2 3 4 5 6
  • Note: Some sources states that he was born on May 3, 1287.
  • Christening: 3 May 1287 Or Netherwood, Thornbury, Hereford, England 3 5 6
  • Death: 29 Nov 1330 in Elms, Tyburn, Warwickshire, England of executed for treason 2 7 8 3 5 6
  • Note:
    Sources for this Information:
    date: [Ref: Holloway WENTWORTH p19, Watney WALLOP #568, Watney WALLOP #709, Weis AR7 #27, Weis MC #147] 1330 [Ref: CP I p28, HoP 1386-1421 v2p353, Sanders Baronies p21, Sanders Baronies p63(7), Sanders Baronies p8(4), Sanders Baronies p96, Sanders Baronies p99, Wagner PedigreeProgress #48], place: [Ref: Watney WALLOP #568, Watney WALLOP #709]
  • Burial: 1330 Church Of Grey Friar, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England 1 3 5 6 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 3 23 5 24 6 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
  • Event: Ludlow Castle Owned Shropshire, England 61 3 5 6
  • Event: Ludlow Castle Founded Aft 29 Jun 1324 Chapel Of St Peter 62 3 5 6
  • Event: Knighted Founder Knight Of The Garter 63 3 5 6
  • Event: De Mortimer House 2
  • _UID: EB40F25698ADEA40A58F6F1FC68CCCEBAD82
  • Change Date: 11 Mar 2013 at 01:12
  • Note:
    He was the 2nd Baron of Mortimer, was summoned to Parliament 1306-1326. This nobleman, notorious in our histories as the paramour of Isabel, Queen Consort of Edward II, was in his sixteenth year at the death of his father. He married Jaone, daughter of Peter de Genville, Lord of Trim, in Ireland. In 34th of Edward I, about 1306, he received the honour of Knighthood. He aided in the Scottish wars, and in 3rd of Edward II, 1310, he was made Governor of the Castle of Buelt, and later was Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. During the latter part of Edward II's reign he attached himself to the Queen, and at length fled with her and Prince Edward to France. He later returned and was made Earl of March soon after the accession of Edward III. He here upon became proud beyond measure (so that his son Geoffrey called him the King of Folly) and assumed royal authority. His career was not however of long continuance, for King Edward III, becoming sensible of his folly and vices, had him seized in the Castle of Queen Isabel in Nottingham and was convicted under various charges, the first was complicity in the murder of Edward II, and receiving sentence of death was hanged in 1330. He left by Joan de Geneville 4 sons and 7 daughters.

    By marriage to Joanna de Geneville, a later Roger Mortimer (1287-1330) secured possession of Ludlow Castle. This became the family's principal power base for the next six generations.
    Roger Mortimer was a very powerful and ambitious Marcher Lord. He was the first of several members of his family to attempt to seize the throne of England. He fought the Scottish Wars and made attempts to remove the King's favorites, at first with some success. In 1323 he was imprisoned in the Tower of London, but escaped to France, an event he later commemorated by building St Peter's chapel in the outer bailey of Ludlow Castle.

    In France, Mortimer formed an alliance with Queen Isabella, who had deserted her effeminate husband, King Edward II of England. They raised an army, invaded England and forced Edward to abdicate in favor of his youngest son, the future Edward III. Mortimer entertained Isabella at his castles on the Welsh borders and they became famous lovers. Meanwhile, Edward II was cruelly murdered at Berkeley Castle in 1327.

    Following Edward's death, Mortimer, acting as regent, was the virtual ruler of England, but he over-reached himself and aroused the anger of other barons. In October 1330 he was arrested at Nottingham and sentenced to death. He was executed at Tyburn in London.

    Later, the ambitions of the Mortimers became part of the great dynastic struggles of the mid-15th century which became known as the "War of the Roses."

    From Encyclopedia Britannica Online, article titled: "March, Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of, 8th Baron Of Wigmore"

    "lover of the English King Edward II's queen, Isabella of France, with whom he contrived Edward's deposition and murder (1327). For three years thereafter he was virtual king of England during the minority of Edward III.

    "The descendant of Norman knights who had accompanied William the Conqueror, he inherited wealthy family estates and fortunes, principally in Wales and Ireland, and in 1304 became 8th Baron of Wigmore on the death of his father, the 7th baron. He devoted the early years of his majority to obtaining effective control of his Irish lordships against his wife's kinsmen, the Lacys, who summoned to their aid Edward Bruce, brother of King Robert I of Scotland, when he was fighting to become king of Ireland. In 1316 Mortimer was defeated at Kells and withdrew to England, but afterward, as King Edward II's lieutenant in Ireland (November 1316), he was largely instrumental in overcoming Bruce and in driving the Lacys from Meath.

    "In 1317 he was associated with the Earl of Pembroke's "middle party" in English politics; but distrust of the Despensers (see Despenser, Hugh Le and Hugh Le) drove him, in common with other marcher lords, into opposition and violent conflict with the Despensers in South Wales in 1321. But, receiving no help from Edward II's other enemies, Roger and his uncle Roger Mortimer of Chirk made their submission in January 1322. Imprisoned in the Tower of London, Roger escaped in 1323 and fled to France, where in 1325 he was joined by Queen Isabella, who became his mistress. The exiles invaded England in September 1326; the fall of the Despensers was followed by the deposition of Edward II and his subsequent murder (1327), in which Mortimer was deeply implicated.

    "Thereafter, as the queen's paramour, Mortimer virtually ruled England. He used his position to further his own ends. Created Earl of March in October 1328, he secured for himself the lordships of Denbigh, Oswestry, and Clun, formerly belonging to the Earl of Arundel; the marcher lordships of the Mortimers of Chirk; and Montgomery, granted to him by the queen. His insatiable avarice, his arrogance, and his unpopular policy toward Scotland aroused against Mortimer a general revulsion among his fellow barons, and in October 1330 the young king Edward III, at the instigation of Henry of Lancaster, had him seized at Nottingham and conveyed to the Tower. Condemned for crimes declared to be notorious by his peers in Parliament, he was hanged at Tyburn as a traitor, and his estates were forfeited to the crown."


    The Mortimers were descended from Roger de Mortemer of Mortemer-s ur-Eaulane in Normandy, a supporter of William t he Conqueror.

    Their main castle was at Wigmore, eight miles west of Ludlow. They had lands mainly in Herefordshire and Shropshire, including Cleobury (Mortimer) on the edge of the hunting forest of Wyre. By marriage to Joanna de Geneville, a later Roger Mortimer (1287-1330) secured
    possession of Ludlow Castle. This became the family's principal power base for the next six generations.

    Roger Mortimer was a very powerful and ambitious Marcher Lord. He was the first of several members of his family to attempt to seize the throne of England. He fought the Scottish Wars and made attempts to remove the King's favorites, at first with some success. In 1323 he was imprisoned in the Tower of London, but escaped to France , an event he later
    commemorated by building St Peter's chapel in the outer bailey of Ludlow Castle.

    In France, Mortimer formed an alliance with Queen Isabella , who had deserted her effeminate husband, King Edward II of England . They raised an army, invaded England and forced Edward to abdicate in f avor of his youngest son, the future Edward III. Mortimer entertained Isabella at his castles on the Welsh borders and they became famous lovers . Meanwhile, Edward II was cruelly murdered at Berkeley Castle in 1327.

    Following Edward's death, Mortimer, acting as regent, wa s the virtual ruler of England, but he over-reached himself and arouse d the anger of other barons. In October 1330 he was arrested at Nottingham and sentenced to death. He was executed at Tyburn in London.
    Later, the ambitions of the Mortimers became part of the great dynastic struggles of the mid-15th century which became known as the "War of the Roses."

    Ludlow Castle is first referred to by chroniclers in 1138 , but its date of origin is not certain. The architecture suggests that the curtain wall of the inner bailey, its flanking towers and parts of the gatehouse-keep date from the late 11th century. The site of Ludlow was in a corner of the important manor of Stanton, held since 1066 by the de Lacy family.
    The level building surface and the steep slopes to the north and west made this a fine
    defensive position. The rivers Teme and Corve gave further protection. Most of the castle was built of chunky Silurian limestone quarried from its own site. It was one of a line of Norman castles along the Marches, built to pacify the countryside and hold back the unconquered Welsh.
    The de Lacys and their heirs retained the lordship until the late 13th century, but in the civil wars of King Stephen's reign it was held by their enemy, Joce de Dinan. In 1139 Stephen himself besieged the castle and showed great bravery by rescuing his ally, young Prince Henry of Scotland, from a grappling iron. The de Lacy's spent much of their time in Ireland, where they won great estates; but Ludlow remained a major power base. At times it was taken into royal hands, as in 1177 and afterwards, when the Pipe Rolls record regular payments 'to the keeper of Ludlow Castle'. Many meetings were held here, as in 1224, when Henry III made a treaty with the Welsh prince Llywelyn ap Iorwerth , with Archbishop
    Langton as mediator.

    When the last male de Lacy died about 1240, the family estates were divided between his two daughters. The castle eventually came into the possession of Geoffrey de Geneville, a French baron from Champagne who was a distant relative of Eleanor, queen to Edward I. Geoffrey spent most of his time in Ireland and in 1283 he gave his lands at Ludlow to his son
    Peter.

    The refurbished castle made a useful base for Roger Mortimer of Wigmore, who married a daughter of Peter de Geneville. He was the leader of a group of barons who dethroned the unpopular Edward II in 1 326. Mortimer was created Earl of March but he over-reached himself and was deposed
    !Fix This Location-919

    He Then Ruled England In The Name of Edward's Son, Edward II.



    1st Earl of March

    -------------------
    8th Baron Mortimer of Wigmore; crowned Earl of March in Oct. 1328. [Ped. of Charlemagne, Vol. III, pp. 15, 132]

    Owner of large estates on the Welsh marches. Paramour of Queen Isabel. She left her husband, King Edward II, and took their son to France with her lover, the rebel exile, Roger Mortimer. Roger and the Queen returned to England in 1326 with a force of mercenaries, soon to be joined by numbers of English supporters of all classes as anxious to see an end to Edward's rule as were the Queen and Mortimer. They defeated the King's forces and forced him to abdicate in favour of his son, now 14 years old. [The Story of England, p. 81]

    1st Earl of March; executed for treason. 2nd Baron by writ, 1299-1326, the favorite of Isabel, consort of King Edward II, created Earl of March; impeached before Parliament and convicted under various charges, he was executed; father of Joan. [Magna Charta Barons, p. 250, 415, 422]

    Tower of London, Aug 1323 -- Roger Mortimer, imprisoned for opposing King Edward's favorites, the Despensers, manages to escape. [Chronicle of the Royal Family, p. 68]

    Roger Mortimer of Chirk and his nephew, Roger Mortimer of Wigmore, were imprisoned in 1322 and the power of the Despensers was restored. [A History of Wales, p. 181]

    In 1323, Roger Mortimer of Wigmore succeeded in escaping from prison; fleeing to France, he became the lover of Isabella, the wife of Edward II, who was in Paris on a mission for her husband. They were agreed on their enmity towards the Despensers, and increasingly towards the king himself. They invaded England on 24 Sept 1326 and the king retreated before them to Wales. He was seized on 16 Dec, probably at Pen-rhys in the Rhondda. The two Despensers were executed, and in January 1327 the deposition of the king was announced in parliament, an assembly which included 24 members from Wales. Edward was imprisoned at Berkeley Castle on the banks of the Severn. Rhys ap Gruffudd failed in his attempt to free him and he was murdered at Berkeley in Sept 1327. [A History, p. 182]

    Controlled the government from 1327-30 since Edward III was only 14 when he became king. Mortimer concentrated upon consolidated his power in Wales. He appointed himself justice of the Principality and made himself master of a chain of lordships extending from Denbigh to Pembroke. In 1328, he took the title of earl of March, thus recognizing that MARCHIA WALLIE was the foundation of his power. His supremacy was brief. In 1330 he was hanged and his property was confiscated. His son Roger was not permitted to take possession of hisancestral lands until 1354, when the Mortimers once again became holders of more territories in Wales than any other of the Marcher Lords. [A History, p. 182]

    b. 1287 [Judy Martin]

    b. 25 Apr 1287, d. 29 Nov 1330; son of Sir Edmund de Mortimer and Margaret de Fiennes; 8th Baron Mortimer of Wigmore, cr. Earl of March, Oct. 1328; m. bef 6 Oct 1306, Joan de Geneville; father of Joan de Mortimer. [Ancestral Roots, p.29]

    Ludlow Castle is one of the most outstanding examples of the Norman castles built in the 11th century to guard the Welsh Marches. Three centuries later Roger Mortimer used the castle to intimidate his political opposition after deposing Edward II. [Castles of Shropshire: Ludlow Castle<http://www.camelotintl.com/heritage/ecastle4.html]

    Father of Eleanor de Mortimer who m. Adam de Clifton. [Ed Mann <edlmann@aol.com]

    Son of Edmund Mortimer and Margaret de Fiennes; m. Joan de Genville; father of Edmund who m. Elizabeth Badlesmere. [WFT European Origins Ped 902]

    The refurbished castle made a useful base for Roger Mortimer of Wigmore, who married a daughter of Peter de Geneville. He was the leader of a group of barons who dethroned the unpopular Edward II in 1326. Mortimer was created Earl of March but he over-reached himself and was deposed and executed by rivals in 1330. Later Mortimers regained power and royal favour and their activities brought Ludlow into the mainstream of national politics. [Ludlow Castle, p. 2]

    Built the Chapel of St Peter at Ludlow Castle to celebrate his escape form the Tower of London on St Peter's Day, 29 Jun 1324. In 1328 Mortimer assigned a rent of 6 13s 4d to two chaplains to celebrate daily service here 'for the souls of the King, Queens Isabel and Phillipa, Henry bishop of Lincoln, the said Roger and Joan his wife'. [Ludlow Castle, p. 4]

    By marriage to Joanna de Geneville, Roger Mortimer secured possession of Ludlow Castle. This became the family's principal power base for the next six generations.
    Roger was a very powerful and ambitious Marcher Lord. He was the first of several members of the family to attempt to seize the throne of England. Later, the ambitions of the Mortimers became part of the great dynastic struggles of the mid-15th century which became known as 'the Wars of the Roses'.
    Roger was one of a number of powerful barons, many of them from the Welsh and Scottish borders, who were able to achieve great power under the weak rule of King Edward II.
    He fought in the Scottish wars and made attempts to remove the King's favourites, at first with some success. In 1323 he was imprisoned in the Tower of London but escaped to France on 1 Aug, an event he later commemorated by building St Peter's chapel in the outer bailey of Ludlow Castle.
    In France, Mortimer formed an alliance with Queen Isabella, who had deserted her effeminate husband. They raised an army, invaded England and forced Edward II to abdicate in favour of his young son, Edward III. Mortimer entertained Isabella at his castles on the Welsh borders and they became lovers. 'Great expense in feasts, tilting and other recreations' is recorded at Ludlow. Meanwhile, Edward II was cruelly murdered at Berkeley Castle.
    Mortimer was now Regent in all but name but he over-reached himself and aroused the envy of other barons. In October 1330 he was arrested at Nottingham and was sentenced to death and executed at Tyburn in London. The first bid by a Mortimer to attain the throne had ended in disaster.
    These events provide the plot for the play 'Edward II' by the Elizabethan dramatist, Christopher Marlowe. Mortimer is given an impressive farewell speech, part of which reads:
    "And seeing there was no place to mount up higher,
    Why should I greave at my declining fall?
    Farewell faire Queene, Weepe not for Mortimer
    That scorns the world, and as a traveller,
    Goes to discover countries yet unknown"
    [Ludlow Castle, p. 12]
    The Mortimers were descended from Roger de Mortemer of Mortemer-sur-Eaulane in Normandy, a supporter of William the Conqueror. Their main castle was at Wigmore, eight miles west of Ludlow. They had lands mainly in Herefordshire and Shropshire, including Cleobury (Mortimer) on the edge of the hunting forest of Wyre. By marriage to Joanna de Geneville, a later Roger Mortimer (1287-1330) secured possession of Ludlow Castle. This became the family'sprincipal power base for the next six generations. Roger Mortimer was a verypowerful and ambitious Marcher Lord. He was the first of several members ofhis family to attempt to seize the throne of England. He fought the ScottishWars and made attempts to remove the King's favorites, at first with some success. In 1323 he was imprisoned in the Tower of London, but escaped to France, an event he later commemorated by building St Peter's chapel in the outer bailey of Ludlow Castle. In France, Mortimer formed an alliance with Queen Isabella, who had deserted her effeminate husband, King Edward II of England. They raised an army, invaded England and forced Edward to abdicate in favor ofhis youngest son, the future Edward III. Mortimer entertained Isabella at his castles on the Welsh borders and they became famous lovers. Meanwhile, Edward II was cruelly murdered at Berkeley Castle in 1327. Following Edward's death, Mortimer, acting as regent, was the virtual ruler of England, but he over-reached himself and aroused the anger of other barons. In October 1330 he was arrested at Nottingham and sentencedto death. He was executed at Tyburn in London. Later, the ambitions of the Mortimers became part of the great dynastic struggles of the mid-15th century which became known as the "War of the Roses." Ludlow Castle is first referred to by chroniclers in 1138, but its date of origin is not certain. The architecture suggests that the curtain wall of the inner bailey, its flanking towers and parts of the gatehouse-keep date from the late 11th century. The site of Ludlow was in a corner of the important manor of Stanton, held since 1066 by the de Lacy family. The level building surface and the steep slopes to the north and west made this a fine defensive position. The rivers Teme and Corve gave further protection. Most of the castle was built of chunky Silurian limestone quarried from its own site. It was one of a line of Norman castles along the Marches, built to pacify thecountryside and hold back the unconquered Welsh. The de Lacys and their heirs retained the lordship until the late 13th century, but in the civil wars ofKing Stephen's reign it was held by their enemy, Joce de Dinan. In 1139 Stephen himself besieged the castle and showed great bravery by rescuing his ally, young Prince Henry of Scotland, from a grappling iron. The de Lacy's spentmuch of their time in Ireland, where they won great estates; but Ludlow remained a major power base. At times it was taken into royal hands, as in 1177 and afterwards, when the Pipe Rolls record regular payments 'to the keeper of Ludlow Castle'. Many meetings were held here, as in 1224, when Henry III made a treaty with the Welsh prince Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, with Archbishop Langton as mediator. When the last male de Lacy died about 1240, the family estateswere divided between his two daughters. The castle eventually came into the possession of Geoffrey de Geneville, a French baron from Champagne who was adistant relative of Eleanor, queen to Edward I. Geoffrey spent most of his time in Ireland and in 1283 he gave his lands at Ludlow to his son Peter. Therefurbished castle made a useful base for Roger Mortimer of Wigmore, who married a daughter of Peter de Geneville. He was the leader of a group of baronswho dethroned the unpopular Edward II in 1326. Mortimer was created earl ofMarch but he over-reached himself and was deposed
    KNIGHTED WITH THE PRINCE OF WALES (AMONG MANY OTHERS) BY THE KING, 5/22/1306; ONE OF THE FOUR BEARERS OF THE ROYAL ROBES AT THE CORONATION OF EDWARD II (2/25/1307/8); LIEUTENANT OF IRELAND FROM 1316; 1ST EARL OF MARCH; 8TH BARON MORTIMER; AFTER WAR DURING WHICH HE SIDED WITH EARL OF LANCASTER AND WAS ABANDONED, HE AND HIS SONS SURRENDERED TO KING AT SHREWSBURY AND WERE SENT TO THE TOWER, WHERE THEY WERE LATER TRIED AND CONDEMNED TO DEATH (SENTENCE COMMUTED TO LIFE IMPRISONMENT); ESCAPED FROM THE TOWER 8/1/1324 (HIS UNCLE ROGER REMAINED THERE UNTIL HIS DEATH IN 1326); CROSSED TO DOVER, WENT TO FRANCE, AND WAS WELCOMED BY CHARLES IV WHOM HE ASSISTED IN HIS WAR WITH EDWARD II IN GUIENNE; ATTENDED CORONATION OF EDWARD III (2/1/1326/7) WHERE 3 OF HIS SONS - EDMUND, ROGER, GEOFFREY - WERE KNIGHTED (A FEW WEEKS LATER HIS LANDS WERE RETURNED AND HE WAS PARDONED FOR HIS JAILBREAK); CRUSHED THE EARL OF LANCASTER THROUGH HIS DALLIANCE WITH QUEEN ISABEL; SUCCESFULLY CONSPIRED TO HAVE THE EARL OF KENT CONDEMNED AND EXECUTED FOR TREASON, WHICH FORCED EDWARD III TO HAVE HIM ARRESTED IN A SURPRISE ATTACK; SENT TO LONDON WITH SONS EDMUND AND GEOFFREY; "DRAWN" TO HIS EXECUTION (DRAGGED BEHIND A HORSE) AND HANGED (BODY LEFT ON THE GALLOWS FOR 2 DAYS AND 2 NIGHTS - NOT BEHEADED AND QUARTERED AS IS SOMETIMES ASSERTED)
    BIBLIOGRAPHY:
    Burke, Sir John Bernard, Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages. London: Burkes, 1883. Reprinted: Baltimore: Genealogical Pub Co, 1978. (1985 printing) M-LH H 929.7 BUR 1985, also NYPL AWN 95-9586.

    Cokayne, George Edward, Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, extant, extinct, or dormant. Gloucester: A Sutton, 1982.

    Holloway, Naomi D, The Genealogy of Mary Wentworth, Who Became the Wife of William Brewster, Revised Edition, October 1969. LDS Film#1738313 item#5

    Paget, Gerald, The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales. London: Charles Skilton Ltd, 1977. Nypl ARF+ 78-835.

    Redlich, Marcellus Donald R Von, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants. Order of the Crown of Charlemagne, 1941.

    Roskell, J S, History of Parliament: The House of Commons 1386-1421. Wolfboro Falls, NH: Alan Sutton, 1992. NYPL JFE 95-5018.

    Sanders, I. J., English Baronies, A Study of Their Origin and Descent 1086-1327. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1960.

    Schwennicke, Detlev, ed., Europaische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der europaischen Staaten, New Series. II: Die Ausserdeutschen Staaten Die Regierenden Hauser der Ubrigen Staaten Europas. Marburg: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1984.

    Wagner, Anthony, Pedigree and Progress, Essays in the Genealogical Interpretation of History, London, Philmore, 1975. Rutgers Alex CS4.W33.

    Watney, Vernon James, The Wallop Family and their Ancestry, Oxford:John Johnson, 1928. LDS Film#1696491 items 6-9.

    Weis, Frederick L, Magna Charta Sureties 1215: The Barons Named in the Magna Charta and Some of Their Descendants. 4th Ed. Baltimore: Gen Pub Co, 1991.

    Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, David Faris, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America before 1700, 7th Edition, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1992.
    RESEARCH NOTES:
    1st Earl of March, of Earldom cr 1328 [Ref: CP VIII p433] Earl of March [Ref: Weis AR7 #120, CP I p28, CP II p3, CP II p49, CP II p130, CP II p308, CP III p353, Sanders Baronies p8(4), HoP 1386-1421 v2p353] 1st Earl of March [Ref: Holloway WENTWORTH p19, CP III p292] 2nd Lord Mortimer, of Barony cr 1295 [Ref: CP IX p284] 8th Baron Mortimer of Wigmore [Ref: Weis AR7 #27, Holloway WENTWORTH p19]

    inherited lordship of Radnor from father [Ref: Sanders Baronies p21] inherited Barony of Wigmore from father [Ref: Sanders Baronies p99]

    Justiciar of Ireland, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland [Ref: Holloway WENTWORTH p19]

    Oct 1328: cr. Earl of March [Ref: Weis AR7 #27]

    it seems possible that he chose the title of "Earl of March" rather than that of Shrewsbury of Salop in order to commemorate the descend of his wife from Joan, one of the coheirs of the ancient Counts of La Marche [Ref: CP VIII p439(h) (with corr in XIV p466)]

    cooperated with Queen Isabella to dethrone Edward II [Ref: Sanders Baronies p99(1)]

    hanged 11/29/1330 [Ref: Watney WALLOP #568, Holloway WENTWORTH p19] hanged at Tyburn [Ref: Watney WALLOP #568]

    executed in 1330; attainted and all his honours were forfeit [Ref: Sanders Baronies p99]




    Father: Edmund De Mortimer b: 1252 in Wigmore, Herefordshire, England
    Mother: Margaret Eleanor De Fiennes b: 1262 in Fiennes, Pas-DE-Calais, Nord-Pas-DE-Calais, France

    Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown
    • Married: Bef 6 Oct 1306 in Shropshire, England
    • Change Date: 2 Jan 2013

    Marriage 2 Isabella "The Fair" De Capet (Plantagenet) b: 1292 in Paris, Louvre, Seine, France
    • Married:
    • Event: assc in Not Married 3 5 6
    • Change Date: 11 Mar 2013
    Children
    1. Has No Children Ralph De Mortimer b: 1082 in Wigmore, Herefordshire, England

    Marriage 3 Joan De Geneville b: 2 Feb 1286 in Ludlow, Shropshire, England
    • Married: 6 Oct 1306 in Shropshire, England 64 65 5 6
    • Note:
      _FREL Natural
      _MREL Natural
      _FREL Natural
      _MREL Natural
      _FREL Natural
      _MREL Natural
      _FREL Natural
      _MREL Natural
      _FREL Natural
      _MREL Natural
      _FREL Natural
      _MREL Natural
      _FREL Natural
      _MREL Natural
    • Change Date: 11 Mar 2013
    Children
    1. Has No Children Roger Mortimer
    2. Has Children Edmund De Mortimer b: 6 Oct 1306 in Wigmore, Herefordshire, England
    3. Has No Children Geoffrey Mortimer
    4. Has No Children John Mortimer
    5. Has Children Joan De Mortimer b: 1317 in Heleigh Castle, Staffs, Eng.
    6. Has Children Beatrice Mortimer b: Abt 1322
    7. Has Children Agnes De Mortimer b: Abt 1313 in Wigmore, Herefordshire, England
    8. Has Children Maud De Mortimer b: Abt 1304
    9. Has Children Catherine De Mortimer b: 1309 in Wigmore, Herefordshire, England
    10. Has Children Margaret De Mortimer b: 1300 in Berkeley, Gloucs, England
    11. Has No Children Blanche Mortimer

    Sources:
    1. Abbrev: Online Resource
      Title: Online Resource
      Note:
      Online Resource.
      Page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_de_Mortimer,_1st_Earl_of_March
      Quality: 3
    2. Abbrev: Online Resource
      Title: Online Resource
      Note:
      Online Resource.
      Page: h t t p : / / w c . r ootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=thomasbledsoe&id=I09877
      Quality: 3
    3. Abbrev: GEDCOM file imported on 8 Aug 2004
      Title: GEDCOM file. Created on 29 Dec 2003. Imported on 8 Aug 2004.
    4. Abbrev: "The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland
      Title: "The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom"
      Author: George Edward Cockayne
      Publication: St Catherine Press, London
      Page: Vol IX:433
      Quality: 3
    5. Abbrev: GEDCOM file imported on 12 Jan 2008
      Title: GEDCOM file. Created on Jan 12, 2008. Imported on 12 Jan 2008.
    6. Abbrev: GEDCOM file imported on 23 Sep 2009
      Title: GEDCOM file submitted by Cathy Ann Abernathy, Rootsweb.com / weavercat@gmail.com. Created on 17 AUG 2009. Imported on 23 Sep 2009.
    7. Abbrev: World Family Tree European Origins, Volume E1
      Title: Family Tree Maker, <i>World Family Tree European Origins, Volume E1</i> (Broderbund Software, Inc., 1997)
      Repository:
        Name: Todd Varner Library

      Page: Ped 902
      Quality: 3
    8. Abbrev: Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 (4th Edition), The
      Title: The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 (4th Edition)
      Author: Frederick Lewis Weis
      Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1991
      Text: "The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 (4th Edition)", by Frederick Lewis Weis, 1991
      Page: line 147, pp 152-153
      Quality: 3
    9. Abbrev: Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Des
      Title: Buck, J. Orton; Beard, Timothy Field, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. III (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1988)
      Repository:
        Name: Cheryl Varner Library
        Gray Court, SC

      Page: p. 15, 132
      Quality: 3
    10. Abbrev: Gedcom File provided by
      Title: Gedcom File provided by
      Text: Gedcom File provided by
      Page: Brent Ruesch, November 21, 2002
      Quality: 2
    11. Abbrev: The Story of England
      Title: Hibbert, Christopher, <i>The Story of England</i> (Phaidon Press Limited, London, 1992)
      Repository:
        Name: Cheryl Varner Library
        Gray Court, SC

      Page: p .81
      Quality: 3
    12. Abbrev: [Plantagenet Descent]
      Title: "Plantagenet Descent" by David A. Blocher
      Author: David A. Blocher <dblocher51@yahoo.com>
      Publication: Personal Usage
      Text: "Plantagenet Descent" by David A. Blocher
      Note:
      Notification indicating people with descendancy from Geoffery Plantagenet (originator of the name, and father of King Henry II).
    13. Abbrev: Magna Charta Barons and Their American Descendants
      Title: Browning, Charles D., Magna Charta Barons and Their American Descendants, 1898 (Clearfield Company, Baltimore, 1969)
      Repository:
        Name: Cheryl Varner Library
        Gray Court, SC

      Page: p. 250, 415, 422
      Quality: 3
    14. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Brooke Shields
      Quality: 1
    15. Abbrev: Chronicle of the Royal Family
      Title: Mercer, Derrik, ed., <i>Chronicle of the Royal Family</i> (Jacques Legrand, London, 1991)
      Repository:
        Name: Cheryl Varner Library
        Gray Court, SC

      Page: p. 68
      Quality: 3
    16. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Jennifer Love Hewitt
      Quality: 1
    17. Abbrev: A History of Wales
      Title: Davies, John, <i>A History of Wales</i> (Allen Lane, The Penguin Press, London, 1993)
      Repository:
        Name: Cheryl Varner Library
        Gray Court, SC

      Page: p. 181-2
      Quality: 3
    18. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Clint Eastwood
      Quality: 1
    19. Abbrev: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who
      Title: Weis, Frederick Lewis, <i>Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700, Seventh Edition</i> (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1995)
      Repository:
        Name: Cheryl Varner Library
        Gray Court, SC

      Page: p. 29
      Quality: 3
    20. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Bing Crosby
      Quality: 1
    21. Abbrev: Our Noble and Gentle Families of Royal Descent Tog
      Title: Foster, Joseph, <i>Our Noble and Gentle Families of Royal Descent Together With Their Paternal Ancestry</i> (Joseph Foster, 1884)
      Page: p. 4
      Quality: 3
    22. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Humphrey Bogart
      Quality: 1
    23. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: John Wayne
      Quality: 1
    24. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Dick Van Dyke
      Quality: 1
    25. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Richard Gere
      Quality: 1
    26. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Walt Disney
      Quality: 1
    27. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Val Kilmer
      Quality: 1
    28. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Dan Blocker
      Quality: 1
    29. Abbrev: Descendant of.....
      Title: Descendant of.....
      Text: Descendant of......
      Page: Attila The Hun
      Quality: 1
    30. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Elvis Presly
      Quality: 1
    31. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Don Knotts
      Quality: 1
    32. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Shirley Temple
      Quality: 1
    33. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Kenny Rogers
      Quality: 1
    34. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Anthony Perkins
      Quality: 1
    35. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Brad Pitt
      Quality: 1
    36. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Miley Cyrus
      Quality: 1
    37. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Halle Berry
      Quality: 1
    38. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Alice Cooper
      Quality: 1
    39. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Fred Gwynne
      Quality: 1
    40. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Vincent Price
      Quality: 1
    41. Abbrev: Descendant of.....
      Title: Descendant of.....
      Text: Descendant of......
      Page: Charlemagne
      Quality: 1
    42. Abbrev: Gedcom File provided by
      Title: Gedcom File provided by
      Text: Gedcom File provided by
      Page: Mark Willis Ballard, September 11, 2010
      Quality: 2
    43. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Teri Hatcher
      Quality: 1
    44. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Oliver Hardy (of "Laurel & Hardy")
      Quality: 1
    45. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: L. Ron Hubbard (Author)
      Quality: 1
    46. Abbrev: [Ancestry of David A. Blocher: Maternal]
      Title: Ancestry of David A. Blocher (Maternal)
      Author: David A. Blocher (personal use) dblocher51@yahoo.com
      Text: Ancestry of David A. Blocher (Maternal)
    47. Abbrev: [Ancestry of David A. Blocher: Paternal]
      Title: Ancestry of David A. Blocher (Paternal)
      Author: David A. Blocher (personal use) dblocher51@yahoo.com
      Text: Ancestry of David A. Blocher (Paternal)
    48. Abbrev: [Ancestry of Jesse James (Outlaw)]
      Title: Ancestry of Jesse James (Outlaw)
      Author: David A. Blocher (dblocher51@yahoo.com)
      Publication: Personal Use
      Text: Ancestry of Jesse James (Outlaw)
    49. Abbrev: [Ancestry of Meriwether Lewis (Explorer)]
      Title: Ancestry of Meriwether Lewis (Explorer)
      Text: Ancestry of Meriwether Lewis (Explorer)
      Note:
      One half of the team of 'Lewis & Clark' that mapped out the Pacific Northwest.
    50. Abbrev: Ancestor of ....
      Title: Ancestor of ....
      Text: Ancestor of
      Page: Hugh Beaumont
      Quality: 1
    51. Abbrev: [Ancestry of Mark Willis Ballard]
      Title: [Ancestry of Mark Willis Ballard]
      Text: Ancestry of Mark Willis Ballard
      Page: Paternal Lineage
      Quality: 3
    52. Abbrev: [Ancestry of Mark Willis Ballard]
      Title: [Ancestry of Mark Willis Ballard]
      Text: Ancestry of Mark Willis Ballard
      Page: Maternal Lineage
      Quality: 3
    53. Abbrev: [Ancestry of President Barack Obama]
      Title: [Ancestry of President Barack Obama]
      Text: Ancestry of President Barack Obama
    54. Abbrev: [Ancestry of Benedict Arnold (Rev. Traitor)]
      Title: [Ancestry of Benedict Arnold (Rev. Traitor)]
      Text: Ancestry of Benedict Arnold (Rev. Traitor)
    55. Abbrev: [Ancestry of Laura Ingles Wilder]
      Title: Ancestry of Laura Ingles Wilder
      Text: Ancestry of Laura Ingles Wilder
    56. Abbrev: [Ancestry of Richard Gere]
      Title: Ancestry of Richard Gere
      Text: Ancestry of Richard Gere
    57. Abbrev: [Ancestry of Fred Gwynne]
      Title: Ancestry of Fred Gwynne
      Text: Ancestry of Fred Gwynne
      Page: Herman Munster of the TV Sitcom "The Munsters"
      Quality: 3
    58. Abbrev: [Ancestry of Linda Joyce Neely]
      Title: Ancestry of Linda Joyce Neely
      Publication: Created for Personal use, no publication.
      Text: Ancestry of Linda Joyce Neely
      Page: Genealogy Colaborator
      Quality: 3
    59. Abbrev: [Ancestry of Dennis Eugene King]
      Title: Ancestry of Dennis Eugene King
      Text: Ancestry of Dennis Eugene King
      Page: 1st Cousin of David A. Blocher
      Quality: 3
    60. Abbrev: [Plantagenet Descent]
      Title: Plantagenet Descent
      Text: Plantagenet Descent
    61. Abbrev: Ludlow Castle
      Title: Lloyd, David, <i>Ludlow Castle</i> (Business ColorPrint, Welshpool, Wales)
      Repository:
        Name: Cheryl Varner Library
        Gray Court, SC

      Page: p. 2
      Quality: 3
    62. Abbrev: Ludlow Castle
      Title: Lloyd, David, <i>Ludlow Castle</i> (Business ColorPrint, Welshpool, Wales)
      Repository:
        Name: Cheryl Varner Library
        Gray Court, SC

      Page: p. 4
      Quality: 3
    63. Abbrev: The Rise of Great Families, Other Essays, and Stor
      Title: Burke, Sir John Bernard, C.B., LL.D., <i>The Rise of Great Families, Other Essays, and Stories (Second Edition)</i> (Longmans, Green, and Co., 1873)
      Repository:
        Name: San Francisco Public Library
        San Francisco, CA

      Page: p. 350
      Quality: 3
    64. Abbrev: Online Resource
      Title: Online Resource
      Note:
      Online Resource.
      Page: h t t p : / / f r e e p a g e s.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~greenefamily/lape/pafg183.htm#23942
    65. Abbrev: Bill Wilkins
      Title: Billyghote@BillWilkins.net
      Note: Billyghote@BillWilkins.net
      Text: Billyghote@BillWilkins.net
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