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  • ID: I19216
  • Name: Ralph De Neville
  • Given Name: Ralph
  • Surname: De Neville
  • Suffix: 1st Earl Of Westmorland / Lordship Of Richmondshir 1
  • Name: Knight Of The Garter
  • Given Name: Knight Of The Garter
  • Surname: 2
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 1364 in Westmoreland, England 2 3
  • Note:
    Sources for this Information:
    date: 1364 [Ref: D. Spencer Hines SGM 4/26/1997-090151] abt 1364 [Ref: Paget HRHCharles p200, Paget HRHCharles p84, Thompson CharlesII #570, Weis MC #45] before 1364 [Ref: Weis AR7 #207, Weis AR7 #2], place: [Ref: D. Spencer Hines SGM 4/26/1997-090151], parents: [Ref: D. Spencer Hines SGM 4/26/1997-090151, Paget HRHCharles p84, Thompson CharlesII #570, Watney WALLOP #728, Weis AR7 #207, Weis AR7 #2, Weis MC #45], father: [Ref: Wagner PedigreeProgress #49]
    Sources with Inaccurate Information:
    date: 1363 [Ref: Louda RoyalFamEurope #5]
  • Death: 21 Oct 1425 in Raby-With-Keverstone, Staindrop, Durham, England
  • Note:
    Sources for this Information:
    date: [Ref: D. Spencer Hines SGM 4/26/1997-090151, ES III.1 #157, Paget HRHCharles p200, Paget HRHCharles p24, Paget HRHCharles p84, Watney WALLOP #728, Watney WALLOP #75, Weis AR7 #207, Weis AR7 #2, Weis MC #45] 1425 [Ref: Louda RoyalFamEurope #5, Thompson CharlesII #570, Wagner PedigreeProgress #49], place: [Ref: Paget HRHCharles p24, Weis AR7 #207, Weis AR7 #2, Weis MC #45]
  • Burial: Church of Staindrop, Raby, Durham, England
  • Event: No Name
  • Note: Neville of Raby / Knight of the Garter 3
  • Event: de Neville House 2
  • Event: Alt. Death 21 Oct 1425 4 3
  • _UID: E36CEDA313EE44CA964956CEDE2336FD25A4
  • Change Date: 8 Mar 2013 at 20:00
  • Note:
    4TH BARON NEVILLE; 1ST EARL OF WESTMORELAND; KG; EARL MARSHAL OF ENGLAND
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    The "Kingmaker's" grandfather, the 1st Earl of Westmorland settled about half the original Neville estates on the children of his second marriage, whereas the subsequent Earls of Westmorland were the product of his first. It thus came about that the 2nd-6th Earls of Westmorland were actually less well-endowed territorially than their ancestors who had been mere barons. The pre-eminence of that branch of the family represented by the Earls of Salisbury/Warwick, who stemmed from the second marriage, was made correspondingly easier.

    The 1st Earl of Westmorland had multiplicity of children: nine by the first wife, fourteen by his second. Of his 23 in all, four were peers, three were duchesses and another four daughters the wives of lesser peers; moreover of those three duchesses one was mother of two kings. Between 1450 and 1455 no fewer than 13 members of the family had seats in the House of Lords. This very fecundity like that of Edward III, engendered quarrels. There was rivalry between the two branches of the family, which grew from a dispute about family estates into a difference as to dynastic loyalties. It thus served as an overture to the Wars of the Roses, one which was made even more ominous by a dispute between the Nevilles, represented by the 1st Marquess of Montagu and the Percys. [Burke's Peerage]

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    Sir Ralph de Neville, KG, b. c 1346, d. Raby 21 Oct 1425, created 1st Earl of Westmorland 1397; m. (1) Margaret Stafford, d. 9 June 1396; m. (2) before 29 Nov 1396 Joan Beaufort, d. Howden 13 Nov 1440, widow of Robert Ferrers, daughter of John, Duke of Lancaster and Katharine (Roet) Swynford. [Magna Charta Sureties]

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    Sixth Baron Neville of Raby, became a Knight of the Garter and 1st Earl Westmoreland September 29, 1397. As a Lancasterian, he opposed Richard II in 1399 and conveyed Richard's resignation to the convention. He assisted in the coronation of Henry IV and was a member of the council of regency appointed to rule in the infancy of King Henry V. With his second marriage to Joan Beaufort, a widowed daughter of John Of Gaunt, fourth son of Edward III, this favorably affected Joan and Ralph's wealth and social prestige, making possible brilliant marriages for their children. In 1450, five of Ralph's sons, five sons-in-law and several grandsons were in Parliament.

    Held many offices, among them Constable of the Tower of London and in 1399, Marshall of England the year he was created Earl of Richmond. He was a member of Richards II's privy council, saw service at Agincourt on October 25, 1415 where Henry won a victory over the superior numbers of French owing to his superior generalship.

    He married his first wife Margaret, daughter of Hugh, Earl of Stafford by special dispensation from Pope Urban V, because of their close relationship.

    The marriage to Joan, his second wife, was a much more distinguished one as the line now descends through the royal house of England. summoned to Parliament from December 6, 1389 to November 30, 1396.

    Some say he is the son of Elizabeth Latimer

    Was created Earl of Westmorland by Richard II on 9-29-1397

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    Ralph de Nevill, 4th baron, summoned to parliament from 6 December, 1389, to 30 November, 1396. This nobleman took a leading part in the political drama of his day and sustained it with more than ordinary ability. In the lifetime of his father (9th Richard II), he was joined with Thomas Clifford, son of Lord Clifford, and was appointed a commissionership for the guardianship of the West Marches. In three years after this he succeeded to the title, and in two years subsequently he was one of the commissioners appointed to treat with the Kings of France and Scotland, touching a truce made by them with the King of England. In the 21st Richard II [1378], he was made constable of the Tower of London and shortly afterwards advanced in full parliament to the dignity of Earl of Westmoreland. His lordship was of the privy council to King Richard and had much favour from that monarch, yet he was one of the most active in raising Henry, of Lancaster, to the throne as Henry IV, and was rewarded by the new king in the first year of his reign with a grant of the county and honour of Richmond for his life, and with the great office of Earl Marshal of England. Soon after this, he stoutly resisted the Earl of Northumberland in his rebellion and forced the Percies, who had advanced as far as Durham, to fall back upon Prudhoe, when the battle of Shrewsbury ensued, in which the gallant Hotspur sustained so signal a defeat, and closed his impetuous career. The earl was afterwards governor of the town and castle of Carlisle, warden of the West Marches towards Scotland, and governor of Roxborough. He was also a knight of the Garter. His lordship m. 1st, Lady Margaret Stafford, dau. of Hugh, Earl Stafford, K.G., for which marriage a dispensation was obtained from Pope Urban V, the earl and his bride being within the third and fourth degrees of consanguinity; by this lady he had issue, John, Lord Nevill; Ralph; Maud; Phillippa; Alice; Margaret; Anne; Margery; and Elizabeth. The earl m. 2ndly, Joan de Beaufort, dau. of John of Gaunt, by Katherine Swynford, and widow of Robert, Lord Ferrers, of Wem, by whom he had issue, Richard; William; George; Edward; Cuthbert; Henry; Thomas; Catherine; Eleanor; Anne; Jane; and Cicely. This great earl d. in 1425 and was s. by his grandson, Ralph Nevill, 5th Baron Nevill, of Raby. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, pp. 393-4, Nevill, Barons Nevill, of Raby, Earls of Westmoreland]

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    RALPH (DE NEVILLE), LORD NEVILLE, son and heir of John (DE NEVILLE), 3rd LORD NEVILLE (a Barony created by writ, 1295), by his 1st wife, Maud, daughter of Henry (DE PERCY), LORD PERCY, was b. about 1364; took part in the Earl of Buckingham's expedition to Brittany, where he was knighted at St. Omer, July 1380; a Commissioner, appointed 14 November, with his cousin, Henry Percy ("Hotspur"), to supervise a duel between an Englishman and a Scotsman at Lyliat Cross, 25 November 1381, and to receive from the Scots 24,000 marks due for King David's ransom, 1 December 1383; Joint Keeper of the castle and city of Carlisle, 26 October 1385; joint Warden of the West March towards Scotland, 27 March 1385/6 and 8 May 1389. He succeeded his father, 17 October 1388, and was summoned to Parliament from 6 December 1389 to 30 November 1396, by writs directed Radulpho de Nevyll de Raby. Joint Surveyor of Fortifications in the Marches, 25 October 1388; Keeper of the Forest beyond Trent for life, 24 May 1389. From 1389 till 1424 he was continmaclly employed on the Border in negotiating truces and peace with Scotland. On 3 June 1391 he obtained the custody of the lands of Gilbert de Umfreville, titular Earl of Angus [SCT], including Harbottle Castle, Northumberland, which he retained till January 1409/10. He also held Wark Castle, in that co., from February 1396/7 to September 1398. Constable of the Tower of London, 21 September-30 October 1397. For his support of the King in that year against the Duke of Gloucester and the Lords Appellant (of 1387-88) he was created, 29 September 1397, EARL OF WESTMORLAND, guardian of the truce in the East March, 28 November 1398. He was, however, with the Earl of Northumberland, one of the first to join the banished Duke of Hereford, his wife's brother, after the landing at Ravenspur, July 1399, and played a prominent part in procuring Richard II's abdication and the elevation of Henry to the throne as Henry IV. On 30 September 1399, the day of Henry's accession, he was made Marshal of England for life, which office he resigned in or before 1412/3. He carried a Sceptre at the Coronation, 13 October, and on the 20th received a grant for life of the Honor of Richmond; P.C. on or before 4 December 1399, being appointed by Parliament, 2 March 1403/4. Commissioner to treat with the King of the Romans for the marriage of the Princess Blanche, 13 February 1400/1; Keeper of Roxburghe Castle, 16 March 1401/2-12 November 1408; K.G. circa 1403. He was with the King in Cymru when the Scots were defeated by the Percies at Homildon Hill, 14 September 1402, but he took the field against Northumberland in the North when the King defeated Hotspur and his uncle Worcester at Shrewsbury, July 1403. Warden of Berwick and the East March, 29 July-6 August 1403, and of Carlisle and the West March, 6 August 1403-15 May 1414. On 29 May 1405 he intercepted the rebellious Archbishop Scrope and the young Lord Mowbray (generally known as the Earl Marshal) at Shipton Moor, co. York, where after a friendly conference, he arrested them in (apparently) a somewhat unscrupulous manner. For his services against the Percies he received a large grant for life of their forfeited "Lucylandes" in Cumberland and Northumberland, June 1405. He was appointed, 17 April 1415, one of the Council of Regency under John, Duke of Bedford, with special responsibility for the Scottish Marches, and took no part in the invasion of France and the battle of Agincourt in that year. On the death of Henry V he was one of the King's executors, and was made a member of the Council of Regency under Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, December 1422. Founder of the collegiate church at Staindrop, co. Durham. He married, 1stly, Margaret, daughter of Hugh (DE STAFFORD) 2nd EARL OF STAFFORD, by Philippe, daughter of Thomas (DE BEAUCHAMP), EARL OF WARWICK. She died 9 June 1396 and was buried at Brancepeth, co. Durham. He married, 2ndly, before 29 November 1396, Joan (formerly Joan DE BEAUFORT), widow of Sir Robert FERRERS, the legitimated (in 1397) daughter of John, "of Gaunt", DUKE OF LANCASTER, by his 3rd wife, Katharine, widow of Sir Hugh SWYNFORD, daughter of Sir Payn ROET, Guienne King of Arms. He died 21 October 1425 at Raby Castle, aged about 61, and was buried under a splendid altar tomb at Staindrop. M.I. to him and his two wives. His widow died 13 November 1440 co. York, and was buried (with her mother) in Lincoln Cathedral. [Complete Peerage XII/2:544-7]
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    Ralph de Neville , KG, 1st Earl Westmorland

    Neville, Ralph, first earl of Westmorland (c.1364-1425), magnate, was the eldest son of John Neville, fifth Baron Neville (c.1330-1388), and Maud (d. 1378/9), daughter of Henry, second Lord Percy of Alnwick.
    Early career
    At his father's death in 1388 Ralph Neville was described as aged twenty-four years and more, so he was probably born about 1364. He was only sixteen when he took part in his first military expedition, accompanying Thomas of Woodstock, earl of Buckingham (d. 1397), to Brittany in 1380: according to Froissart he was knighted along with seven others at St Omer. Like his father and grandfather, however, he played out his military career chiefly on the northern border. In October 1385 he was appointed governor of Carlisle Castle jointly with Thomas, son of Lord Clifford; in March 1386 he became warden of the west march at the same time as his father was appointed warden of the east march, and in 1389, following his father's death in the previous year, his appointment as warden of the west march was renewed. In 1393-4 he took part in the negotiations for peace with the Scots that followed the negotiations held at Leulinghem in the early 1390s for a final settlement with France. He also held office as justice of the peace in the North and West ridings of Yorkshire in these years. He may have contemplated joining Richard II on his Irish expedition in 1394-5, for he appointed attorneys in November to administer his affairs while he was with the king in Ireland, but there is no other evidence that he went there.
    By the 1390s the Neville family had become as powerful and important in the north as the Percys, but although Richard II had created Henry, Lord Percy of Alnwick, earl of Northumberland in 1377, the Nevilles had remained without a title, though of course they had been summoned to parliament as barons of Raby since 1295. Ralph Neville's father and grandfather had had close links with the court and both had served for a time as steward of the household of Edward III. His uncle Alexander Neville, archbishop of York, had been one of Richard's favourites and had fled into exile at the end of 1387, only to be tried for treason in his absence in the Merciless Parliament of February 1388. Ralph Neville in his turn became prominent at court in the 1390s: he was retained as a king's knight by Richard II in May 1395 at a fee of £130 p.a., and over the following two years his standing greatly increased. Perhaps Richard II saw in the Nevilles a potential counterweight to the Percys in the north; perhaps, too, the family's traditional links with the house of Lancaster stood Ralph in good stead. His father had been a retainer of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, from at least 1366 until his death, and although Gaunt did not retain Ralph during his father's lifetime he was in receipt of Gaunt's fee by 1397, and was one of the executors of his will. His first wife, Margaret, daughter of Hugh Stafford, second earl of Stafford, and Philippa, daughter of Thomas Beauchamp, earl of Warwick, died on 9 June 1396, and within a few months (certainly by 29 November 1396) he had married Joan Beaufort (1379?-1440), widow of Sir Robert Ferrers and legitimized daughter of John of Gaunt and his mistress, Katherine Swynford [see Katherine, duchess of Lancaster]. This marriage was a measure of the standing Neville now enjoyed at court and his close relationship with John of Gaunt: it was to have major consequences both for the Neville family and for the English nobility more generally in the mid-fifteenth century.
    Neville's influence at court enabled him to pursue the family's interest in the honour of Richmond and other English lands of the dukes of Brittany, which his father had developed in the 1370s and early 1380s. In 1390 Henry Fitzhugh (d. 1425) had been granted a twelve-year lease on Richmond by the queen's feoffees; in 1395 the reversion of the lease was granted to Neville, and within a few months Fitzhugh had surrendered his interest in the honour to Neville. In November 1396 Richard granted him and his wife jointly for life another part of the Brittany lands, the manor of Penrith and Sowerby; eleven months later the grant was converted into one in tail male. There seems little doubt that Neville's marriage to Joan opened up extensive resources of patronage for him, and in view of later disputes about the descent of his inheritance it is significant that many of the grants he received at this time were made jointly to him and his wife. On the other hand, Neville had little influence on the Scottish border at this time. Between 1390 and 1396 the Percys monopolized the wardenships of the marches, and only with his temporary acquisition of the lordship of Wark-on-Tweed in February 1397 did he acquire a foothold in the eastern march.
    The earl's political role, 1397-1399
    In the political upheaval of September 1397 Neville remained loyal to Richard II. His importance to the king and Gaunt was demonstrated at the trial for treason of the earl of Arundel in the parliament of September 1397. According to both Walsingham and Adam Usk, Gaunt, who presided over the trial as high steward of England, ordered Neville to remove Arundel's belt and scarlet hood; Walsingham also suggests that Neville had custody of the earl of Warwick while he awaited trial on charges of treason in the same parliament.
    Neville was rewarded for his loyalty by being created earl of Westmorland on 29 September 1397, and on the following day he joined other nobles in taking the oath to uphold the work of the parliament. Westmorland's attachment to Richard did not, however, survive Henry Bolingbroke's invasion of England in July 1399: his links with the house of Lancaster proved more durable than those with Richard II. When Gaunt died in February 1399 his son Henry was in exile, and Richard assumed control of the Lancastrian inheritance. He confirmed an annuity of 500 marks granted by Gaunt to Westmorland and his wife, but did so on the understanding that Westmorland was ?retained to stay with the king only? (CPR, 1396-9, 548), a restriction which Richard insisted on when confirming other Lancastrian annuities at this time. This annuity, which was assigned mainly on duchy of Lancaster lands in Yorkshire, replaced one of 400 marks granted to Joan Beaufort and her first husband. Perhaps of more importance in determining Westmorland's allegiance in 1399 was Richard's restoration of the Richmond lands to the duke of Brittany's sister in December 1398, though the duke himself seems to have assumed that they had been returned to him.
    This action, together with the injustice of the sequestration of the Lancastrian inheritance and the king's appointment of courtiers with little interest in the region to positions of authority on the northern border, probably inclined Westmorland to throw in his lot with Bolingbroke, his brother-in-law, in 1399. According to Adam Usk, Westmorland, together with the earl of Northumberland, joined Henry at Doncaster within a few days of Henry's landing at Ravenspur, probably at the beginning of July. The two earls marched south with Henry, but Westmorland evidently did not join Northumberland in the journey to meet Richard at Conwy and persuade him to leave the castle and come, virtually as a prisoner, to meet Henry at Flint. Westmorland appears to have remained at Chester during this time, but on 20 August he and Northumberland set out with Henry and Richard for London, where Richard was lodged in the Tower. On 28 and 29 September Westmorland and Northumberland represented the earls in the delegations sent to Richard in the Tower to persuade him to resign the crown; the two earls were among the witnesses to the document which embodied Richard's supposed renunciation, and were among the proctors appointed by the estates to convey their renunciation of homage to Richard after his formal deposition. The accounts of Jean Creton and Walsingham, together with the anonymous tract entitled ?The manner of King Richard's renunciation?, all suggest that Westmorland readily supported the deposition of Richard II and Henry's assumption of the crown. John Hardyng, who admittedly wrote much later and had close links with the Percys, maintained that Henry swore an oath at Doncaster that he had come only to claim his inheritance and that subsequently, when Richard was in the Tower, both Westmorland and, which is harder to believe, Northumberland, advised Henry not to ?do anything contrary to his oath? (Chronicle, ed. Ellis, 351). Although it has been argued that Henry was indeed guilty of perjury in taking the crown, and although there is some legitimate doubt about whether Northumberland's son Henry Percy (Hotspur) genuinely supported Henry's seizure of the throne, nothing in Westmorland's conduct in 1399 or in his subsequent attitude to Henry as king suggests that he had any serious reservations about Henry's right to be king. His family's traditional links with the house of Lancaster, and long history of service to the crown, together perhaps with a realistic appreciation of the benefits he was likely to derive from loyalty to the new regime, explain the support which Westmorland gave Henry IV throughout his reign and his service too under his son Henry V.
    The conflict with the Percys
    Westmorland's rewards were not long in coming after Henry's accession. On the very day that Henry became king he was created marshal of England for life (though he resigned the office by 1412), and on 20 October he was granted the honour of Richmond for life: Henry IV evidently ignored its restoration to the Breton ducal family by Richard II the previous year. He also received several wardships, including that of the Dacre estates, and he was a regular member of Henry IV's council between 1399 and 1404. He became a knight of the Garter in 1403, filling the vacancy created by the death of the duke of York in the previous year. His influence on the border was not, however, as great as he might have hoped: the wardenships of both marches were in the hands of the Percy family, and only in March 1402, with the transfer of the keeping of Roxburgh Castle to him from Hotspur, did he begin to acquire some presence in the marches. The sweeping grant of much of southern Scotland to the earl of Northumberland a year later, as a reward for his victory at Homildon Hill, did not include Roxburgh, but Westmorland's outpost there would have been surrounded by Percy territory had the Percys been able to gain possession of the territory so liberally granted to them. The exclusion of Westmorland from office in the marches in the opening years of Henry's reign may well explain the growing rivalry between the two families, and he probably saw the Percy rebellion of 1403 as an opportunity to break Percy power in the north. After the battle of Shrewsbury on 21 July 1403 Henry instructed Westmorland to raise troops and intercept the earl of Northumberland to prevent his marching south in support of the rebels. Westmorland drove Northumberland back to Warkworth Castle; then, through Lord Say, he advised Henry that the Percy castles in the north should be taken by force if necessary, and urged the king to appear in person in the north to counteract rumours put about by Percy retainers that he was dead.
    Westmorland now profited substantially from his loyalty: he was granted the wardenship of the west march, which he was to hold until 1414, when his son John succeeded him. The new warden of the east march was the king's son John, later duke of Bedford, aged fourteen, but Westmorland's influence was strong there too. However, Henry may not have welcomed the prospect of Neville predominance in the north any more than that of the Percys. In the parliament of January 1404 the king pardoned Northumberland, restored his castles to him, and at the request of the Commons brought about a reconciliation between him and Westmorland. The reconciliation proved short-lived, however: in May of the following year Northumberland led a raid on Sir Ralph Eure's castle at Witton-le-Wear with the intention of capturing Westmorland, who had been staying there. Westmorland was forewarned of the attack and left the castle before Northumberland's force arrived. It may be that this was the ?opening act? of a new rebellion by Northumberland in concert with the archbishop of York, Richard Scrope, who had his own grievances against Henry IV. Northumberland perhaps hoped to neutralize his most dangerous opponent before committing himself to open revolt: his failure to do so may explain why he did not overtly support the rebellion which Scrope and the young Thomas (II) Mowbray, the earl marshal, raised in Yorkshire in late May, but instead fled to Scotland. His estates were subsequently forfeited to the crown.
    Westmorland moved rapidly to quell the rebellion and prevent Percy retainers from joining forces with Scrope's men. At Topcliffe near Thirsk he defeated a group of Percy and Mowbray retainers from Cleveland, and then marched towards York. He intercepted Scrope's forces at Shipton Moor, 5 miles north of the city, on 27 May. Westmorland's forces were outnumbered by those of the rebels, and Westmorland decided to resort to parleying rather than battle. He sent envoys to Scrope asking why he was in warlike array: the archbishop replied that he would rather have peace than war, but showed the envoys the schedule of grievances against Henry IV that he had drawn up. Westmorland gave every appearance of sympathy for Scrope's demands, and invited Scrope and Mowbray to meet him and discuss them. When they met, on neutral ground between the two camps, Westmorland again expressed his sympathy with the rebels' grievances and according to Walsingham declared his willingness to persuade the king to remedy them. Westmorland concluded the meeting with a glass of wine and prevailed upon Scrope to send his forces home. No sooner had they gone, however, than he arrested Scrope and Mowbray on charges of treason and imprisoned them in Pontefract Castle to await the arrival of the king on 3 June. Five days later they were both executed. Walsingham gives the fullest and most circumstantial account of the episode, and he is borne out in essentials by both Giles's chronicle and the continuation of the Eulogium historiarum sive temporis chronicon. There seems little doubt that Westmorland's skilful, if duplicitous, handling of the negotiations with Scrope and Mowbray brought their rebellion to an end without great bloodshed or wider danger to the crown. Scrope proved a gullible opponent, but Westmorland demonstrated both his astuteness and his loyalty to the crown. He profited handsomely from Northumberland's fall. He and his wife were granted the Percy lordships of Cockermouth and Egremont in Cumberland and the barony of Langley in Northumberland (the former Lucy inheritance) for life, and all other Percy lands in the west march were committed to him for the time being.
    Later career
    The Scrope rebellion, however, proved the climax of Westmorland's career. Although he was only forty-one in 1405, the rest of his life was devoted mainly to service on the northern border. He continued to hold office as warden of the west march: he indented to serve with 50 men-at-arms and 100 mounted archers in time of peace, and double that number in time of war. He was to receive £1250 p.a. in time of peace and £2500 in time of war to cover his expenses, mainly the wages of his troops, but by 1409 the crown was substantially in debt to him, as it had been to the Percys earlier in Henry IV's reign and indeed in the reign of Richard II. However, financial difficulties with the crown never threatened to undermine Westmorland's loyalty to the Lancastrian monarchy. He regularly held office as justice of the peace in Cumberland, Westmorland, and the three ridings of Yorkshire; he was appointed to commissions to negotiate with the Scots throughout the reigns of both Henry IV and Henry V, and he successfully resisted the Scottish invasion of 1417 known as the ?Foul Raid?. He was nominated a member of the council appointed under the leadership of the prince of Wales on 2 May 1410, but he was excused service on the ground that he was needed on the northern border. He does not seem to have formed close links with the prince and the group of younger nobles around the prince who were influential in politics and diplomacy as the deepening illness of Henry IV rendered him incapable of action for lengthy periods in the last three years of his reign.
    When the prince succeeded to the throne as Henry V in 1413, Westmorland's relationship with him seems to have been more distant than it had been with his father. Indeed, he received what he may have regarded as something of a snub in November 1414 when the reversion of the honour of Richmond, which Westmorland held for life, was granted to the king's younger brother John, duke of Bedford. The involvement of Westmorland's son-in-law Sir Thomas Grey of Heaton in the Southampton plot against Henry V in 1415 perhaps cast a temporary cloud over Westmorland's relationship with the king. The Grey family had close links with the Nevilles; Thomas Grey had been one of Westmorland's retainers since at least 1404, and his advancement in Henry IV's reign may have owed something to Westmorland's patronage. Westmorland played an important part in the negotiations that led in 1417 to the return from Scotland and restoration to the family's honours and lands of Henry Percy, grandson of the first earl of Northumberland. There was some potential danger to the Nevilles in a Percy restoration, but the marriage of Henry Percy to Westmorland's daughter Eleanor, which Joan Beaufort may have engineered, served to bind the two families together and prevent any immediate revival of their rivalry, despite the restored earl's appointment as warden of the east march in April 1417.
    Although the first folio text of Shakespeare's Henry V gives Westmorland, on the eve of Agincourt, the famous words:
    O that we now had here
    But one ten thousand of those men in England
    That do no work today
    (Henry V, IV.iii)
    he did not in fact accompany the king on the campaign of 1415 and was not present at Agincourt (the first quarto text attributes these lines to the earl of Warwick). Perhaps his age-he was fifty-one in 1415-made it difficult for him readily to identify with the martial enthusiasm of the younger nobles around the king. Yet his distance from the king should not be exaggerated. Henry perhaps saw him as a loyal elder statesman; he appointed him one of his executors for the will he made before leaving for France in 1415 and again for his last will in 1422. In this will Henry bequeathed a gold goblet to both Westmorland and Joan. After Henry V's death in 1422 Westmorland's status and experience ensured his appointment to the council of regency established for the infant Henry VI.
    Westmorland's family and will
    Like his father Westmorland devoted some of his resources to buildings which expressed his wealth and status. He continued his father's work at Sheriff Hutton Castle, where there survives a shield impaling his arms with those of Joan Beaufort, and in 1410 he obtained a licence from Bishop Langley of Durham to establish a college of priests at Staindrop church, close to Raby Castle.
    Westmorland died on 21 October 1425, and was buried in the choir of his collegiate church at Staindrop. In his will he stated his wish to be buried either in Durham Cathedral or at Staindrop: the magnificent alabaster tomb at Staindrop with effigies of himself and his two wives was perhaps commissioned in London and would have been capable of being placed in either church: presumably his executors decided upon Staindrop. His second wife, Joan Beaufort, is not buried with him, even though her effigy appears on his tomb: she died in 1440 and is buried in Lincoln Cathedral.
    Westmorland fathered a total of twenty-two or twenty-three children. With his first wife, Margaret, he had two sons: John (b. c.1387), who married Elizabeth Holland and died in May 1420, and Ralph (d. 1458), who married Mary (c.1394-1458), daughter and coheir of Sir Robert Ferrers of Oversley and his wife, Joan Beaufort, who later became Ralph's stepmother. He also had with Margaret six or seven daughters, whose marriages indicate Westmorland's wish to strengthen his family's links with other northern noble families: Matilda married Peter, Lord Maulay; Philippa married Thomas, Lord Dacre; Alice married first Sir Thomas Grey of Heaton, and after his execution for treason in 1415 Sir Gilbert Lancaster; Elizabeth followed family tradition and became a nun in the Minories; Anne married Sir Gilbert Umfraville of Kyme (d. 1421); and Margaret married first Richard, Lord Scrope of Bolton (d. 1420), and second William Cressener. He may have had another daughter, Anastasia, who died in infancy or childhood.
    With his second wife, Joan Beaufort, Westmorland had nine sons and five daughters. The eldest son, Richard Neville, earl of Salisbury (1400-1460), married Alice, daughter and heir of Thomas Montagu, earl of Salisbury (d. 1428); the second son, William Neville (1401?-1463), married Joan, daughter and heir of Sir Thomas Fauconberg of Skelton, Yorkshire (d. 1407); the third son, George (d. 1469), inherited the estates of his uncle of the half-blood John Neville, Lord Latimer, but he became insane c.1450 and the custody of his lands passed to his brother Richard. George married Jane Welby. The fourth son, Robert Neville (1404-1457), entered the church and became successively bishop of Salisbury (1427-38) and of Durham (1438-57). The fifth son, Edward Neville (d. 1476), married Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Richard Beauchamp, earl of Worcester. He also had four sons-Henry, Thomas, John, and Cuthbert-who died in infancy or childhood. His eldest daughter with Joan Beaufort, Katherine Neville (c.1400-1483), was married four times: to John (V) Mowbray, duke of Norfolk (d. 1432); Sir Thomas Strangways; John Beaumont, Viscount Beaumont (d. 1460); and Sir John Woodville (d. 1469). The second daughter, Eleanor, married first Richard, Lord Despenser (d. 1414), and then Henry Percy, second earl of Northumberland, who was killed at the first battle of St Albans in 1455. The third daughter, Anne (d. 1480), married first Humphrey Stafford, duke of Buckingham, who was killed at Northampton in 1460, and second Walter Blount, Lord Mountjoy (d. 1474). The fourth daughter, Cecily (d. 1495), married Richard, duke of York, who was killed at Wakefield in 1460: she was the mother of Edward IV and Richard III. The fifth daughter, Joan, became a nun.
    Shortly after his marriage to Joan Beaufort, Westmorland embarked on a series of enfeoffments, the effect of which was to settle the greater part of his inheritance on his children with her, largely disinheriting his sons from his first marriage. The honour of Penrith, granted jointly to him and Joan in 1396, was entailed on the heirs of their bodies, and in 1398 Sheriff Hutton was settled on him and Joan jointly. When Westmorland made a will on 8 August 1400, however, it was probably not yet his intention to deprive his children from his first marriage of a substantial part of their inheritance. This will does not survive, and was in any case superseded by his final will made in 1424, but his grandson Ralph Neville, second earl of Westmorland (d. 1484), evidently believed that it favoured the children of his first marriage, for during his dispute with Joan and her children in the 1430s over the inheritance he sought unsuccessfully to have its contents made public.
    In the years after Westmorland made his first will, the disinheritance of the children with his first wife gathered pace. In 1404 Sheriff Hutton was entailed on his heirs male by Joan, and other Yorkshire lands, including Middleham, were similarly settled during Henry IV's reign. Finally, in 1417, Raby itself was settled on his children with Joan. The earldom of Westmorland had been granted in tail male and thus passed to the senior line, but the only estates left to the two sons of the senior line as a result of these enfeoffments were Brancepeth in co. Durham, the barony of Bywell and Styford in Northumberland, the manor of Cambois and other lands in Bedlingtonshire, Northumberland, some manors in Lincolnshire, the Neville Inns in London and Newcastle, and some property in Ripon. John Neville, Westmorland's eldest son from his first marriage, seems to have made no effort to prevent his virtual disinheritance, and indeed some later evidence suggests that he consented to some of the transactions, including the conveyance of Sheriff Hutton to his father's heirs with Joan. He died in May 1420, predeceasing his father.
    Westmorland's final will, made at Raby on 18 October 1424, was niggardly in its legacies to his children with his first wife. Their daughters Matilda, Philippa, Alice, and Margaret received bequests of gold and silver plate, but their grandson Ralph, heir to the title, is not mentioned, and their second son, Ralph, was left the barony of Bywell and Styford, Northumberland, in tail male together with ?a flock of sheep, twenty-four cows, one bull? and some gold and silver plate (register of wills of John Kempe, fol. 495).
    Westmorland's grandson Ralph, who became second earl of Westmorland at his grandfather's death in 1425, was to prove more willing than his father to attempt to reverse the first earl's dispositions, but in the event his attempts to regain much of his lost inheritance proved unsuccessful. His grandfather's scheme, described by Charles Ross as ?an ambitious family fraud? (Ross, 45), survived largely intact and the concentration of so much territorial power in the hands of Westmorland's son Richard, earl of Salisbury, and grandson Richard, earl of Warwick, was to have a major impact on English politics during the conflict between York and Lancaster in the years after 1450.
    Anthony Tuck
    Sources
    indentures of war, PRO, E 101 ? inquisitions post mortem, PRO, C 139, C 141 ? inquisitions post mortem for Durham, PRO, DUR 3/2 ? BL, additional charter 20582 ? chancery close rolls, PRO ? CIPM ? CPR?Annales Ricardi secundi?, Johannis de Trokelowe et Henrici de Blaneforde ? chronica et annales, ed. H. T. Riley, pt 3 of Chronica monasterii S. Albani, Rolls Series, 28 (1866), 155-280 ? ?Annales ? Henrici quarti?, Johannis de Trokelowe et Henrici de Blaneforde ? chronica et annales, ed. H. T. Riley, pt 3 of Chronica monasterii S. Albani, Rolls Series, 28 (1866), 280-420 ? ?The manner of King Richard's renunciation?, Chronicles of the revolution, 1397-1400: the reign of Richard II, ed. and trans. C. Given-Wilson (1993), 162-7 ? Chronicon Adae de Usk, ed. and trans. E. M. Thompson, 2nd edn (1904) ? F. S. Haydon, ed., Eulogium historiarum sive temporis, 3 vols., Rolls Series, 9 (1858-63) ? J. A. Giles, ed., Incerti scriptoris chronicon Angliae de regnis trium regum Lancastrensium (1848) ? The chronicle of John Hardyng, ed. H. Ellis (1812) ? Chroniques de J. Froissart, ed. S. Luce and others, 9 (Paris, 1894) ? register of wills of John Kempe, archbishop of York, Borth. Inst., fols. 495-6 ? RotP, vols. 3-4 ? RotS, vol. 2 ? Dugdale, Monasticon, new edn ? [J. Raine], ed., Wills and inventories, 1, SurtS, 2 (1835) ? C. Given-Wilson, The royal household and the king's affinity: service, politics and finance in England, 1360-1413 (1986) ? G. L. Harriss, Cardinal Beaufort: a study of Lancastrian ascendancy and decline (1988) ? M. Jones, Ducal Brittany, 1364-1399 (1970) ? J. L. Kirby, Henry IV of England (1970) ? P. McNiven, ?The betrayal of Archbishop Scrope?, Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library, 54 (1971-2), 173-213 ? J. A. Petre, ?The Nevilles of Brancepeth and Raby, 1425-1499 [pt 1]?, The Ricardian, 5 (1979-81), 418-35 ? T. B. Pugh, Henry V and the Southampton plot of 1415, Southampton RS, 30 (1988) ? C. D. Ross, ?The Yorkshire baronage, 1399-1435?, DPhil diss., U. Oxf., 1950 ? R. L. Storey, The end of the house of Lancaster (1966) ? S. Walker, The Lancastrian affinity, 1361-1399 (1990) ? [J. Creton], ?Translation of a French metrical history of the deposition of King Richard the Second ? with a copy of the original?, ed. and trans. J. Webb, Archaeologia, 20 (1824), 1-423, esp. 13-239 ? Thomae Walsingham, quondam monachi S. Albani, historia Anglicana, ed. H. T. Riley, 2 vols., pt 1 of Chronica monasterii S. Albani, Rolls Series, 28 (1863-4) ? GEC, Peerage
    Archives
    PRO, government records
    [Ref: Anthony Tuck, ?Neville, Ralph, first earl of Westmorland (c.1364-1425)?, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004, Lives of the Week, 22 Mar 2007]

    Regards,
    Curt

    -------------------------

    Sir Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, 4th Baron Neville de Raby, Lord of Richmond, Earl Marshal, KG, PC (ca. 1364 - 21 October 1425), was an English nobleman of the House of Neville.[1] He was born in Raby Castle, County Durham, England, the son of John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby and Lady Maud Percy.[2]

    Life

    He was knighted by Thomas of Woodstock, during the French expedition of 1380. In 1388, following the death of his father, he became the fourth Baron Neville de Raby. In 1391, Neville was put on the commission that undertook the duties of Constable in place of Gloucester and was repeatedly engaged in negotiations with the Scots. On 29 September 1397, due to his support towards Richard II, against the Lords Appellant, Neville was created the 1st Earl of Westmorland.

    As a Lancastrian he supported the overthrow of Richard by Henry Bolingbroke and Bolingbroke's coronation as King Henry IV in October 1399. As a reward he was appointed Earl Marshal for life (but resigned in 1412). He was invested as a Privy Counsellor before 4 December 1399.[3] In 1403, he was made a Knight of the Garter, taking the place left vacant by the death of Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York. Neville was a supporter of King Henry IV who endowed him with the honour and lordship of Richmond for life. Like the first lords of Richmond and Peter II of Savoy before him, Ralph was endowed with Richmond, but without the title.[2]

    The Neville family were natural rivals of the Percy family. In 1403, the power of the Percys had fallen at the Battle of Shrewsbury. Both marches had been in their hands, but the west marches was now assigned to Neville, who's influence in the east was also paramount. Neville had prevented Northumberland from marching to reinforce Hotspur before embarking on a new revolt to secure his enemy, Northumberland. In May 1403, while the Percys were in revolt with Thomas de Mowbray, 4th Earl of Norfolk, and Archbishop Scrope, Neville met them at Skipton Moor, near York, and suggested a parley between the leaders. Scrope and Mowbray were seized after Mowbray let his followers disperse and handed over to Northumberland at Pontefract Castle. It is believed by some historians that the two had voluntarily surrendered. If Neville had betrayed them, he certainly shared no part in their execution.[2]

    In the later part of his career, Neville was mainly engaged with defence of the northern border in his capacity as warden of the west march (1403-1414). In 1415 he decisively defeated an invading Scottish army at the Battle of Yeavering.[2] In 1422, he was a member of the Council of Regency during the minority of King Henry VI.[3]

    Neville was a great church builder, 'curious flat headed windows being peculiar to the churches on the Neville manors'. Neville died on the 21st of October 1425, and a fine alabaster tomb was erected to his memory in St. Mary's Staindrop Church, close by Raby Castle, where his effigy in armour between his two wives remains the finest sepulchral monument in the north of England.[2][3] When he died, he left money to complete the College of Staindrop which he founded near Raby.[3] His first wife, Lady Margaret de Stafford was buried at Brancepeth Castle.[4] His second wife, Lady Joan Beaufort, was buried with her mother, Katherine Roet, under a carved-stone canopy in the sanctuary of Lincoln Cathedral.[5] Joan's is the smaller of the two tombs; both were decorated with brass plates - full-length representations of them on the tops, and small shields bearing coats of arms around the sides and on the top - which were damaged or destroyed in 1644 during the English Civil War. He was survived by most of his 23 children. As his eldest son, Sir John de Neville by Margaret de Stafford pre-deceased him, he was succeeded in his titles by his grandson, Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland.[6]
    [edit] Shakespeare

    The character of Westmorland in William Shakespeare's plays Henry IV, Part 1, Henry IV, Part 2, and Henry V is based on Neville. Neville did not play the part that was assigned to him in Shakespeare's Henry V. During Henry V's absence he remained in charge of the north and was a member of the Council of Regency in 1415, during King Henry V's absence.[2] It has been claimed by Brenda James and Professor William Rubinstein that Neville's great-great-grandson, Sir Henry Neville wrote the works of William Shakespeare.
    [edit] Marriages

    Lady Margaret de Stafford, c.1382, daughter of Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford and Philippa de Beauchamp.
    Lady Joan Beaufort, before 29 November 1396, at Château de Beaufort, Maine-et-Loire, Anjou, France.[7] Lady Joan was the daughter of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster and his third wife, Katherine Roet, and half-sister of Henry IV of England.

    [edit] Family and children

    He had nine children by Lady Margaret de Stafford:

    Lady Maud Neville (d. October 1438), married Piers de Mauley, 5th Baron Mauley
    Lady Alice Neville, married first Sir Thomas Grey of Heton; married second Sir Gilbert Lancaster
    Lady Philippa de Neville, married Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre
    Sir John Neville, Baron Neville of Raby (c.1387-c.1420), married Lady Elizabeth de Holland, daughter of Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent and Lady Alice FitzAlan. They were parents to Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland and John Neville, 1st Baron Neville de Raby.[8]
    Sir Ralph Neville (c.1392-25 Feb 1458), married Mary Ferrers, his stepsister, daughter of Sir Robert Ferrers and Joan Beaufort (1379-1440) and had issue.
    Lady Elizabeth Neville, a nun at Minories, London, England.
    Lady Anne Neville (b. circa 1384), married Sir Gilbert Umfraville.
    Lady Margaret Neville (d. ca. 1465), married first Richard Scrope, 3rd Baron Scrope of Bolton; married second William Cressoner.
    Lady Anastasia Neville

    He had fourteen children by Lady Joan Beaufort:

    Lady Katherine Neville, married first on 12 January 1411 John Mowbray, 2nd Duke of Norfolk; married second Sir Thomas Strangways; married third John Beaumont, 1st Viscount Beaumont; married fourth Sir John Woodville (d. 12 August 1469).
    Lady Eleanor Neville (1398-1472), married first Richard le Despencer, 4th Baron Burghersh, married second Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland.
    Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury (1400-1460), married Alice Montacute, 5th Countess of Salisbury. Had issue. Their descendants include Queen Consort to Henry VIII, Catherine Parr and Richard Neville, the "Kingmaker".
    William Neville, 1st Earl of Kent (d. 1463).
    Robert Neville (d. 1457), Bishop of Durham.
    John Neville (1407 - 20 March 1420).
    Edward Nevill, 3rd Baron Bergavenny (d. 1476).
    Lady Anne Neville (1414-1480), married Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham and then she went on to marry Walter Blount, 1st Baron Mountjoy.
    Lady Cecily Neville (1415-1495) ("Proud Cis"), married Richard, 3rd Duke of York; mother of Kings Edward IV of England and Richard III of England.
    George Neville, 1st Baron Latymer (d. 1469)
    Cuthbert Neville, died young.
    Thomas Neville, died young.
    Henry Neville, died young.
    Lady Joan Neville, a nun.

    References

    1. "Neville, Ralph (1364-1425)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885-1900.
    2. a b c d e f Encyclopædia Britannica, 11th Ed. Vol XXVIII. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1910. 553.
    3. a b c d Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volume 1, page 14.
    4. G.E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/2, pg 547.
    5. Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family, page 109.
    6. Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 899.
    7. Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 108.
    8. Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volume 1, page 15

    Sources:

    1. Author: Peter Barns-Graham, Chairman
    Title: Stirnet.com
    Publication: Name: http://www.stirnet.com;
    Page: Nevill01, Nevill02, Plantagenet2

    ----------------
    PLAC 1sr Earl of Westmoreland
    PLAC fourth Baron, who in the 21st of King Richard II was made constable of the t
    PLAC of London, a Knight of the Garter
    The "Kingmaker's" grandfather, the 1st Earl of Westmorland settled about half the original Neville estates on the children of his second marriage, whereas the subsequent Earls of Westmorland were the product of his first. It thus came about
    that the 2nd-6th Earls of Westmorland were actually less well-endowed territorially than their ancestors who had been mere barons. The pre-eminence of that branch of the family represented by the Earls of Salisbury/Warwick, who stemmed from the
    Note: second marriage, was made correspondingly easier. Note:
    The 1st Earl of Westmorland had multiplicity of children: nine by the first wife, fourteen by his second. Of his 23 in all, four were peers, three were duchesses and another four daughters the wives of lesser peers; moreover of those three
    duchesses one was mother of two kings. Between 1450 and 1455 no fewer than 13 members of the family had seats in the House of Lords. This very fecundity like that of Edward III, engendered quarrels. There was rivalry between the two branches of
    the family, which grew from a dispute about family estates into a difference as to dynastic loyalties. It thus served as an overture to the Wars of the Roses, one which was made even more ominous by a dispute between the Nevilles, represented
    by the 1st Marquess of Montagu and the Percys. [Burke's Peerage]

    Note: ---------------------------------------- Note:
    Sir Ralph de Neville, KG, b. c 1346, d. Raby 21 Oct 1425, created 1st Earl of Westmorland 1397; m. (1) Margaret Stafford, d. 9 June 1396; m. (2) before 29 Nov 1396 Joan Beaufort, d. Howden 13 Nov 1440, widow of Robert Ferrers, daughter of John,
    Duke of Lancaster and Katharine (Roet) Swynford. [Magna Charta Sureties]

    Note: ---------------------------------------- Note:
    Sixth Baron Neville of Raby, became a Knight of the Garter and 1st Earl Westmoreland September 29, 1397. As a Lancasterian, he opposed Richard II in 1399 and conveyed Richard's resignation to the convention. He assisted in the coronation of Henry IV and was a member of the council of regency appointed to rule in the infancy of King Henry V. With his second marriage to Joan Beaufort, a widowed daughter of John Of Gaunt, fourth son of Edward III, this favorably affected Joan and Ralph's wealth and social prestige, making possible brilliant marriages for their children. In 1450, five of Ralph's sons, five sons-in-law and several grandsons were in Parliament. Held many offices, among them Constable of the Tower of London and in 1399, Marshall of England the year he was created Earl of Richmond. He was a member of Richards II's privy council, saw service at Agincourt on October 25, 1415 where Henry won a victory over the superior numbers of French owing to his superior generalship. He married his first wife Margaret, daughter of Hugh, Earl of Stafford by special dispensation from Pope Urban V, because of their close relationship. Note: The marriage to Joan, his second wife, was a much more distinguished one as the line now descends through the royal house of England. summoned to Parliament from December 6, 1389 to November 30, 1396. Note: Some say he is the son of Elizabeth Latimer Note: Was created Earl of Westmorland by Richard II on 9-29-1397

    ------Note: Ralph de Nevill, 4th baron, summoned to parliament from 6 December, 1389, to 30 November, 1396. This nobleman took a leading part in the political drama of his day and sustained it with more than ordinary ability. In the lifetime of his father Note: (9th Richard II), he was joined with Thomas Clifford, son of Lord Clifford, and was appointed a commissionership for the guardianship of the West Marches. In three years after this he succeeded to the title, and in two years subsequently he was one of the commissioners appointed to treat with the Kings of France and Scotland, touching a truce made by them with the King of England. In the 21st Richard II [1378], he was made constable of the Tower of London and shortly afterwards advanced in full parliament to the dignity of Earl of Westmoreland. His lordship was of the privy council to King Richard and had much favour from that monarch, yet he was one of the most active in raising Henry, of Lancaster, to the throne as Henry IV, and was rewarded by the new king in the first year of his reign with a grant of the county and honour of Richmond for his life, and with the great office of Earl Marshal of England. Soon after this, he stoutly resisted the Earl of
    Note: Northumberland in his rebellion and forced the Percies, who had advanced as far as Durham, to fall back upon Prudhoe, when the battle of Shrewsbury ensued, in which the gallant Hotspur sustained so signal a defeat, and closed his impetuous career. The earl was afterwards governor of the town and castle of Carlisle, warden of the West Marches towards Scotland, and governor of Roxborough. He was also a knight of the Garter. His lordship m. 1st, Lady Margaret Stafford, dau. of Hugh, Earl Stafford, K.G., for which marriage a dispensation was obtained from Pope Urban V, the earl and his bride being within the third and fourth degrees of consanguinity; by this lady he had issue, John, Lord Nevill; Ralph; Maud; Phillippa;
    Note: Alice; Margaret; Anne; Margery; and Elizabeth. The earl m. 2ndly, Joan de Beaufort, dau. of John of Gaunt, by Katherine Swynford, and widow of Robert, Lord Ferrers, of Wem, by whom he had issue, Richard; William; George; Edward; Cuthbert; Note: Henry; Thomas; Catherine; Eleanor; Anne; Jane; and Cicely. This great earl d. in 1425 and was s. by his grandson, Ralph Nevill, 5th Baron Nevill, of Raby. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Note: Ltd., London, England, 1883, pp. 393-4, Nevill, Barons Nevill, of Raby, Earls of Westmoreland] Note: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999 Note: Page: 10-33, 207-34 Note: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999 Page: 45-7, 47-7, 8-9, 8a-9 Note: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999

    Note: Page: 12-13, 14

    Note: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000 Note: Page: XII/1:450

    Sixth Baron Neville of Raby and first Earl of Westmorland (1364- 1425) was the eldest son of John de Neville, fifth baronNeville of Raby . . . on 29 Sept. [1397], Neville was made Earlof Westmorland [by Richard II]. He held no land in that
    county, but it was the nearest county to his estates not yettitularly appropriated, and the grant of the royal honor ofPenrith gave him a footing on its borders.' However, in 1399Ralph joined the successful rebellion of Henry IV againstRichard II. He had twenty-three children by his two wives -nine by the first, and fourteen by the second. The children ofthe first marriage, seven of whom were females,
    were thrown into the shade by the offspring of his more splendidsecond alliance which brought royal blood into the family andthe real headship of the Neville house passed to the eldest sonof the second family .His will gave most of his property to hissecond wife Joan Beaufort and her descendants, but the title ofEarl of
    Westmorland passed to the descendants of his first wife MargaretStafford.

    RESEARCH NOTES:
    1st Earl of Westmoreland, of Earldom cr 1397 [Ref: CP XII/2 p544] 1st Earl of Westmoreland [Ref: CP III p355] Earl of Westmoreland [Ref: CP I p152, Weis AR7 #10, Weis AR7 #207, CP II p62, CP II p134, CP II p389, CP II p427, Paget HRHCharles p84, Paget HRHCharles p87, CP III p260, CP III p293, CP IV p7] 4th Lord Neville of Raby, of Barony cr 1295 [Ref: CP IX p503] Lord Neville [Ref: Thompson CharlesII #570]

    K.G. [Ref: Weis AR7 #2, Weis AR7 #10, Weis AR7 #207]

    first Earl of Westmoreland [Ref: Weis AR7 #10, Weis AR7 #207]

    created 1st Earl of Westmoreland, 1397 [Ref: Weis MC #45, Weis AR7 #2, Weis AR7 #10]

    will made Oct 18 1424, pro Nov 14 1425-Oct 7 1426 [Ref: Weis AR7 #2]

    -----------------------------
    Name Suffix:<NSFX> K.G.
    Name Prefix:<NPFX> Sir
    9-19-2006
    from: h t t p : / / w w w . t u d o r p l a c e .com.ar/NEVILLE2.htm#Ralph%20DE%20NEVILLE%20(1%B0%20E.%20Westmoreland)

    Knight of the Garter. The Complete Peerage, v.XIIpII,pp544-549-supported his brother-in-law Henry IV's seizure of power 1399.
    Name Suffix:<NSFX> K.G.
    Name Prefix:<NPFX> Sir

    Earl Marshal 1400 - 1412
    Earl of Westmorland 1397 - 1425
    Baron Neville de Raby 1388 - 1425

    -------------
    He was created 1st Earl of Westmorland in 1397. He had become the fifth Baron Neville de Raby in 1388. He was made a Knight of the Garter in 1402, taking the place left vacant by the death of Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York. Neville was a supporter of King Henry IV of England.

    In the later part of of his career, Neville was mainly engaged with defense of the northern border in his capacity as warden of the west march. In 1415, for example, he decisively defeated an invading Scottish army at the Battle of Yeavering.

    Like the first lords of Richmond and Peter II of Savoy before him, Ralph was endowed with the lordship of Richmondshire but without the peerage.

    Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland (c. 1364 ? October 21, 1425) was born in Raby Castle, County Durham, England, the son of John de Neville and Maud Percy.

    In the later part of his career, Neville was mainly engaged with defense of the northern border in his capacity as warden of the west march. In 1415, for example, he decisively defeated an invading Scottish army at the Battle of Yeavering.
    4
    RALPH of NEVILLE

    Occupation: BET 1397 AND 1425 1st Earl of Westmoreland

    Occupation: 1386 Governor of Carlisle

    Occupation: 1389 Warden of the Forests north of Trent

    Occupation: 1398 Constable of the Tower of London

    Occupation: 1402 Knight of the Garter

    A Knight of the Garter, and supporter of King Henry IV of England, he was the son of John de Neville and Maud Percy. His first wife (1382) was Margaret Stafford, daughter of Sir Hugh Stafford and Philippa de Beauchamp. On November 29, 1396, he married as his second wife Joan Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster(son of Edward III) and Katherine de Roet (better known as Katherine Swynford).

    He had nine children by Margaret Stafford. He had fourteen children by Joan Beaufort. The character of Westmoreland in William Shakespeare's play Henry V is based on de Neville. It has been claimed by Brenda James and Professor William Rubinstein that de Neville's great-great-grandson, Sir Henry Neville wrote the works of William Shakespeare.
    (Wikipedia)

    Ralph Nevill, son of Maud Percy, 4th Baron, Lord of Raby, Governor of Carlisle 1386, Warden of the Forests north of Trent 1389. Constable of the Tower of London 1398. Created in full Parliament to dignity of Earl of Westmoreland December 21, 1398, by Richard II.

    He was summoned to Parliament 1389-1396. This nobleman took an active and leading part in the political drama of his day and sustained it with more than ordinary ability. His lordship was of the privy council to King Richard and had much favour from that monarch, yet he was one of the most active in raising Henry of Lancaster to the throne as Henry IV, and was rewarded by the new King in the first of his reign, with a grant of the county and honour of Richmond for life and with the great office of Earl Marshal of England.

    Soon after this, he stoutly resisted the Earl of Northumberland in his rebellion and forced the Percies (who were Earls of Northumberland), who had advanced as far as Durham to fall back upon Prudhoe when the Battle of Shrewsbury ensued, in which the gallant Hotspur (Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland) and his mother's nephew) was killed, sustained so signal a defeat and closed his impetuous career.

    The only rival of the Nevills in the north were the Percies, whose power was thus broken at Shrewsbury. Ralph Nevill, Earl of Westmoreland, married 1st Margaret, daughter of Hugh Stafford, 2nd Joane de Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt and Katherine Swynford, son of Edward III. Joane was half sister to King Henry IV.
    (Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 834)

    In 1380, in his sixteenth year, he entered the service, in the French expedition under the King's uncle, Thomas of Woodstock, Earl of Buckingham, afterwards Duke of Gloucester, who knighted him. In 1384 he was associated with his father in receiving the last instalments of David Bruce's ransom. In 1385 he was appointed joint governor of Castile, with the eldest son of Lord Clifford.

    On the death of his father in 1388, at the age of twenty-four, he became Baron of Raby. On the 24th of May, 1389, he was made warden of the royal forests north of Trent. The following year he was employed in negotiations with Scotland.
    (Dunham Genealogy English and American Branches of the Dunham Family)

    Sources:

    1. Title: 1Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    2. Title: Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith
    Page: 834


    Source:

    R. C. Karnes, Rootsweb.com
    Updated January 2008




    Father: John De Neville b: 1328 in Raby With Kevers, Durham, England
    Mother: Maud De Percy b: Abt 1315 in Alnwick, Northumberland, England

    Marriage 1 Margaret De Stafford b: 1365 in Brancepeth, England
    • Married: 1382 in Of, Stafford, Staffordshire, England
    • Note:
      _FREL Natural
      _MREL Natural
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      _MREL Natural
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      _MREL Natural
      _FREL Natural
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    • Change Date: 8 Mar 2013
    Children
    1. Has No Children Maud De Neville b: 1384 in Raby Castle, Raby With Keverstone, Staindrop, Durham, England
    2. Has No Children Ralph Neville b: Abt 1386 in Raby, Durham, England
    3. Has Children Philippa De Neville b: 1386 in Raby-With-Keverstone, Staindrop, Durham, England
    4. Has Children John De Neville b: 1387 in Raby Castle, Raby With Keverstone, Staindrop, Durham, England
    5. Has Children Alice Neville b: Abt 1389 in Raby Castle, Raby With Keverstone, Staindrop, Durham, England
    6. Has No Children Elizabeth De Neville b: 1390 in Raby Castle, Raby With Keverstone, Staindrop, Durham, England
    7. Has Children Ralph II De Neville b: 1392 in Raby Castle, Raby With Keverstone, Staindrop, Durham, England
    8. Has No Children Anne Nevill b: Abt 1393
    9. Has No Children Anastasia De Neville b: 1395 in Raby Castle, Raby With Keverstone, Staindrop, Durham, England
    10. Has Children Margaret De Neville b: 1398 in Raby-With-Keverstone, Staindrop, Durham, England

    Marriage 2 Joan De Gaunt Plantagenet b: 1375 in Beaufort Castle, Beaufort, Anjou, France
    • Married: 29 Nov 1396 in Chateau DE Beauf, Meuse-Et-Loire, France
    • Note:
      Sources for this Information:
      date: 3 Feb 1396 [Ref: D. Spencer Hines SGM 4/26/1997-090151] before 20 Feb1397 [Ref: Paget HRHCharles p24] before 29 Nov 1396 [Ref: Paget HRHCharlesp200, Paget HRHCharles p84] before 3 Feb 1396/7 [Ref: Weis AR7 #2] secondmarriage of Ralph [Ref: CP II p389, CP II p427, CP II p62, Weis AR7 #207] vor20.II 1397 [Ref: ES III.1 #157], names: [Ref: Moriarty Plantagenet p2,Thompson CharlesII #570, Watney WALLOP #75], child: [Ref: CP I p27, CP IIp389, CP II p427, CP II p62, CP IX p605, CP VII p163, CP VII p479, CP XII/2p562, D. Spencer Hines SGM 4/26/1997-090151, ES II #86, Louda RoyalFamEurope#5, Paget HRHCharles p200, Paget HRHCharles p21, Paget HRHCharles p24, PagetHRHCharles p84, Paget HRHCharles p87, Thompson CharlesII #285, Watney WALLOP#728, Watney WALLOP #9, Weis AR7 #207, Weis AR7 #3, Weis AR7 #78, Weis MC#161]
      Sources with Inaccurate Information:
      date: 1398 [Ref: Louda RoyalFamEurope #5]
    • Change Date: 8 Mar 2013
    Children
    1. Has Children Eleanor De Neville b: 1399 in Raby England,
    2. Has Children Richard De Neville b: 1400 in Raby, Durham, England
    3. Has No Children Joan Neville b: Abt 1398 in Of, Raby, Durham, England
    4. Has Children Catherine De Neville b: Abt 1401 in Raby, Durham, England
    5. Has No Children Henry De Neville b: Abt 1402 in Raby Castle, Durham, England
    6. Has No Children Thomas De Neville b: Abt 1403 in Of, Raby, Durham, England
    7. Has No Children Thomas De Neville b: Abt 1402 in Raby, Durham, England
    8. Has No Children Robert De Neville b: 1404 in Of, Raby, Durham, England
    9. Has No Children Cuthbert De Neville b: Abt 1405 in Raby, Durham, England
    10. Has Children William De Neville b: 1400 in Raby-With-Keverstone, Staindrop, Durham, England
    11. Has Children George De Neville b: Abt 1414 in Raby-With-Keverstone, Staindrop, Durham, England
    12. Has No Children Anne De Neville b: Abt 1411 in Of Westmorland, England
    13. Has Children Anne De Neville b: 1411 in Raby Castle, Raby With Keverstone, Staindrop, Durham, England
    14. Has No Children John De Neville b: Abt 1413 in Of, Raby, Durham, England
    15. Has Children Edward De Neville b: Abt 1412 in Raby Castle, Raby With Keverstone, Staindrop, Durham, England
    16. Has Children Cecily De Neville b: 31 May 1415 in Raby Castle, Durham, England

    Marriage 3 Isabel b: 1252 in Stainton, Lincolnshire, England
    • Married:
    • Change Date: 11 Dec 2012
    Children
    1. Has Children Elizabeth De Neville b: 1274 in Stainton, Lincolnshire, England

    Sources:
    1. Abbrev: Public Member Trees
      Title: Public Member Trees
      Author: Ancestry.com
      Publication: Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006.Original data - Family trees submitted by Ancestry members.Original data: Family trees submitted by Ancestry members.;
      Note:
      Ancestry.com, Public Member Trees (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006.Original data - Family trees submitted by Ancestry members.Original data: Family trees submitted by Ancestry members.), This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created.
      .
      Page: Ancestry Family Trees
      Quality: 3
      Text: h t t p : / / trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=4013448&pid=-473000074
    2. Abbrev: Online Resource
      Title: Online Resource
      Note:
      Online Resource.
      Page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_de_Neville,_1st_Earl_of_Westmorland
      Quality: 3
    3. Abbrev: Online Resource
      Title: Online Resource
      Note:
      Online Resource.
      Page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Neville,_1st_Earl_of_Westmorland
      Quality: 3
    4. Abbrev: Online Resource
      Title: Online Resource
      Note:
      Online Resource.
      Page: h t t p ://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=laduke&id=I14097
      Quality: 3
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