srodenbough

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  • ID: I5850
  • Name: Heinrich Rodenbach 1
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 11 JUL 1709 in Neuwied, Neuwied, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
  • Death: 1759 in Lebanon, Hunterdon, New Jersey, USA
  • Note:
    RODENBOUGH, variously spelled RODENBACH, RODENBOCK or RODENBOUGH, is a name of German origin signifying "red brook". An influential family by the name of RODENBACH flourished in Silesia in the XV century. Silesia is a historical region of Central Europe located mostly in Poland, with smaller parts also in the Czech Republic, and Germany. Silesia is rich in mineral and natural resources, and includes several important industrial areas. Silesia's largest city and historical capital is Wroclaw. Other large cities are Opole and Katowice in Poland, Ostrava and Opava in the Czech Republic, Görlitz in Germany. Its main river is the Oder (in German; in Polish and Czech: Odra).

    Silesia's borders and national affiliation have changed radically over time, both when it was a hereditary possession of noble houses and after the rise of modern nation-states. The first known states to hold power there were those of Greater Moravia at end of 9th century and Bohemia early in the 10th century. In the 10th century Silesia was incorporated into the early Polish state, but it later broke into independent duchies, coming under increasing Czech and German influence. It came under the rule of the Crown of Bohemia, which passed to the Austrian Habsburg Monarchy in 1526. Most of Silesia was conquered by Prussia in 1742, later becoming part of the German Empire and German Reich up to 1945. After World War I (1918) the easternmost part of this region was awarded to Poland by the victorious Allies after rebellions by Silesian Polish people and a plebiscite. After World War II (1945) the bulk of Silesia was transferred to Polish jurisdiction and become legally and politically part of Poland. Meanwhile the remaining small parts of Silesia mostly went to Czechoslovakia after World War I, and are now in the Czech Republic.

    The names of RODENBERG, RODENBURG and RODENBORCH of Dutch origin may be found in the Colonial Records of the State of New York. In the year 1649, Lucas Rodenborch (also spelled RODENBURG) was Vice Director at Curagoa to whom consignments of American products were made from New Amsterdam. Remarried Catrine Roeloffse (daughter of the celebrated Anneke Bogardus Jansse) and died in 1656. The early settlement of New Haven, Connecticut, was, under the Dutch rule, known as "Rodenbergh". (All the villages settled by the English, from New Holland or Cape Cod unto Stamford, within the Dutch limits, amount to about thirty, and may be estimated at nearly 5000 persons capable of bearing arms. Among the whole of them the Rodenbergh or New Haven is the principal. It has a Governor, contains about 1340 families and is a province or market of New England. This place was begun eleven years ago in 1638. (Colonial History of New York. V. I, 286.)) On an early map (Noting, 1689) of the New England coast the name of the present Sandy Hook, New York Harbor, is inscribed "Pointe Rodenberg".

    The earliest records at hand show that the first of the name of RODENBOUGH in America settled, about the year 1738-39, in what is now Lebanon, Hunterdon County, New Jersey.

    "From 1682 to 1776 Pennsylvania was the central point of emigration to America from Germany, France and Switzerland. Penn's liberal views and the illiberal course of the government of New York toward the Germans induced many to come to this Province. During the first twenty years (1682-1702) comparatively few Germans arrived, not above two hundred families: they located principally near Germantown. (All male persons above the age of sixteen did repeat and subscribe their names or made their mark to the following declaration: "We subscribers, natives and late inhabitants of the Palatinate upon the Rhine and places adjacent, having transported ourselves and families into this Province of Pennsylvania, a colony subject to the crown of Great Britain, in hope and expectation of finding a retreat and peaceable settlement therein, Do solemnly promise and engage that we will be faithful and bear true allegiance to his present Majesty, King George the Second and his successors, Kings of Great Britain, and will be faithful to the proprietor of this Province; and that we will demean ourselves peaceably to all his said Majesty's subjects, and strictly observe and conform to the Laws of England and of this Province, to the utmost of our power and the best of our understanding." "Rupp's Thirty thousand Names of German, etc., Immigrants, 1727-1776.")

    From 1702 to 1727 nearly 50,000 Germans and other Protestants emigrated to America. In 1705 a number of German Reformed residing near Wolfenbuttel and Halberstadt, fled from religious persecution to Neuwied (Neuwied is a town in the north of the German state of Rhineland-Palatinate, capital of the District of Neuwied. Neuwied lies on the right bank of the Rhine, 12 km northwest of Koblenz, on the railway from Frankfurt am Main to Cologne. The town has 13 suburban administrative districts: Heimbach-Weis, Gladbach, Engers, Oberbieber, Niederbieber, Torney, Segendorf, Altwied, Block, Irlich, Feldkirchen, Heddesdorf, and Rodenbach.), a town of Rhenish Prussia, where they remained some time and then went to Holland, from which they took ship (1707) bound for New York. The vessel was, by reason of adverse winds, carried into the Delaware Bay. Determined, however, to reach their destination, her passengers took the overland route from Philadelphia to New York. On entering the fertile valleys in "Nova Caesaria", now New Jersey, which is drained by the meandering Musconetcong, the Passaic and their tributaries, and having reached a goodly land, they resolved to remain in what is now known as the German Valley of Hunterdon County." These men were principally farmers, of whom Governor Thomas said, in 1738, "This Province has been for some years the asylum of the distressed Protestants of the Palatinate and other parts of Germany; and I believe it may truthfully be said that the present flourishing condition of it is in a great measure owing to the industry of these people; it is not altogether the fertility of the soil but the numbers and industry of the people that makes a country flourish."

    Among those who crossed the ocean to avoid religious persecution was Heinrich Rodenbough, a native of the Palatinate, who arrived at Philadelphia, Sept. 9, 1738, in the ship Glasgow, Walter Sterling, master, from Rotterdam. He settled in the region just described where he found among the neighbors many of his countrymen. Here, after much hard work, he established a modest homestead, accumulated a few acres, a flock or two of sheep and a due proportion of horses and cattle. Fourteen years after his arrival in New Jersey Heinrich was joined by John Peter Rodenbough, his brother. Of the other members of the family, at this date, we are without definite information. The first of whose children there is a family record was:

    BIRTHS, MARRIAGES AND DEATHS

    SECOND GENERATION
    John(2) (supposed to have been the son of Heinrich(1)) and to have been born in Bethlehem Township, Hunterdon County, N. J., about 1740. He married (1763) Elizabeth, daughter of, _______ and died April, 1788. Letters of administration upon his estate were granted to his wife and son John(3). John(2) and Elizabeth Rodenbough had: Elijah(3), Adam(3), Peter(3), John(3), Henry(3), Herbert(3) and William(3).

    THIRD GENERATION
    Henry(3) (John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born near Bethlehem, N. J., July 29, 1768. He was brought up to the life of a farmer, and succeeded to the homestead upon his father's death. He was a faithful disciple of Calvin and became a "Ruling Elder" of the Presbyterian Church. He died at Bethlehem, N. J., Nov. 17, 1836.
    Henry(3) Rodenbough married (1) June, 1790, Ann Young (d. Sept. 1793).
    They had:
    (I.) John, b. March 18, 1791; m. ________ ; d. _________.

    Henry(3) Rodenbough married (2) Aug. 26, 1795, Margaret Brown (b. Nov. 7, 1774; d. New Hampton, N. J., Aug. 15, 1864).
    They had:
    (II.) Charles, b. Oct. 1, 1797; m. May 16, 1836, Emily Cauffman; d. Easton, Pa., Aug. 26, 1872.
    (III.) James, b. July 18, 1800; d. Oct. 1, 1802.
    (IV.) Ann, b. March 6, 1803; d. Oct. 12, 1804.
    (V.) Rachel, b. July 30, 1805 ; m. Joseph King; d. Oct. 12,1866.
    (VI.) Elizabeth, b. June 4, 1808 ; m. Aug. 29, 1834, Ebenezer Wolverton; d. June 15, 1853.
    (VII.) Elijah, b, March 11, 1811 ; m. July, 1840, Elizabeth Anderson; d. Aug. 18, 1862.
    (VIII.) Elisha, b. May 22, 1814; d, Aug. 21, 1819.
    (IX.) Samuel Leigh, b. May 25, 1817; m. (1) Oct. 1, 1851, Clara Ann Shatwell ; (2) Nov. 16, 1869, Mary Elizabeth Rinek; d. Easton, Pa., Nov. 28, 1885.

    Herbert(3) (John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born in Hunterdon County, N. J., about 1769. He married, Oct. 19, 1793, Ann Dils, and died at _______ on ________.
    They had:
    (I.) John Hockenberry, b. Aug. 1, 1785; m. May, 1804, Sarah Smith; d. Canton, Ill., May 1, 1865.
    (II.) Henry
    (III.) Herbert
    (IV.) Morris
    (V.) Margaret
    (VI.) Ann
    (VII.) Sarah
    (VIII.) Elizabeth

    FOURTH GENERATION
    Charles(4) (Henry(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born at Bethlehem, Hunterdon County, N. J., October 1, 1797. He was naturally studious and while at home made the most of his moderate educational advantages. The life of a farmer was not attractive to him, and at the age of twenty-one he accepted a clerkship with a merchant and mill-owner in Greenwich, Warren County, N. J., with whom he subsequently entered into partnership. In 1825 and in 1834 he made flying trips to the South for the benefit of his health, at the same time adding to his information regarding the industrial and commercial growth of the country. In 1830 he entered into the coal, iron and lumber business at Phillipsburg, N. J., and Easton, Pa. (first in partnership with George W. Housel and William Muirheid, and later with his brother, Samuel Leigh, and his son, Joseph Swift); during this period in connection with John Stewart, Esq., he established a rolling mill and wire manufactory at South Easton, a successful enterprise from which he withdrew in 1853; it is said that the first telegraph wire was made at this mill. In 1868 Mr. Rodenbough retired from active business with an ample fortune. He had no political aspirations, and the few offices held by him were unsolicited. He was the first President of the Lehigh Water Company, a Director of the Easton Bank and President of the Board of Trustees of the Presbyterian Church. To an unblemished integrity, high business attainments and respect for law and order, were joined a practical interest in religious and educational matters, and a broad but undemonstrative charity. Charles Rodenbough died at Easton, Pa., August 26, 1872.

    He married at Christ Church, Philadelphia, May 16, 1836, Emily, daughter of Laurence Cauffman, Esq., of that city. (by Rev. John W. James (Mr. James was Asst. Minister of Christ Church for four years preceding his decease, and was elected Rector July 21, 1826, on the death of Bishop White. On the north wall of Christ Church there is a mural tablet with the following inscription: "In memory of the Reverend John Waller James Rector of this Church who died Aug. 14, 1836, aged 31 years. 'I wish to say to the dear people of my charge, Remember the words I spake unto you while I was yet alive. The same truths make me happy in the prospect of death and heaven.'"))
    They had :
    (I.) Theophilus Francis, b. Easton, Pa., Nov. 5, 1838; m, Sept. 1, 1868, Elinor Frances, daughter of James Foster, U. S. N.
    (II.) Joseph Kinnersley Swift, b. Easton, Pa., Dec. 24, 1841; m. Oct. 5, 1865, Emily Holt, daughter of Russell S. Chidsey, Esq., of Easton, Pa.

    Rachel(4) (Henry(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born near Bethlehem, Hunterdon County, N. J., July 24, 1805. She married Joseph King, and died Oct. 12, 1866: he died July 20, 1874.
    They had:
    (I.) Margaret Rodenbough, b, March 5, 1837; d. March 29, 1874.
    (II.) Emily Rodenbough, b. July 13, 1844; d. Dec. 17, 1874.
    (III.) Samuel, b. ______; m. _______.

    Elizabeth(4) (Henry(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born in Bethlehem Township, Hunterdon County, June 4, 1808. She married Aug. 29, 1834, Ebenezer Wolverton, (b. Aug. 17, 1807; d. Union Township, Hunterdon County, N. J., Sept. 5. 1891) and died at the above place June 17, 1853. Mr. Wolverton was a member of the N. J. Legislature (1870's).
    They had:
    (I.) Charles, b. ______; m. _______, Mary Bowlby.
    (II.) Henry, b. April 28, 1839; served during War for the Union in Co. B, 41st N. J. Vols.; d. Belle Plain, Va., April 8, 1863.
    (III.) Jonathan, b. ______; m. _______.
    (IV.) Elisha, b. ______; m. _______. Martha Lunger.
    (V.) Ann Elizabeth, b. ______; m. _______. Joseph Sherer and had one daughter.
    VI. Chester, b. Bethlehem, N. J., Dec. 17, 1850; m. Oct. 25, 1875, Mary M. Hoffman, and had: Thomas C. (b. Aug., 1876) and Edwin R. (b. ______).
    VII. Benjamin, b. ______, 1853; m. ______ Miss Scott, and had one son.

    Elijah(4) (Henry(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born in Bethlehem Township, Hunterdon County, N. J., March 11, 1811. He married, July, 1840, Elizabeth Anderson, and died at Bethlehem, N. J.. Aug. 18, 1862.
    They had:
    (I.) Stewart, b. Sept. 1, 1844; m. Sept. 29, 1869, Anna Sherman, and had: Charles (b. May 12, 1871).
    (II.) George, b. Dec. 6, 1846.
    (III.) Samuel Leigh, b. Oct. 15, 1850; m. _______ Bowlby, and had: William (b. ______).

    Samuel Leigh(4) (Henry(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born at Bethlehem, Hunterdon County, N. J., May 25, 1817. He removed to Easton, Pa., soon after attaining his majority, and, in partnership with his brother Charles, was actively engaged in mercantile pursuits from 1844 to 1869, when on account of failing health he retired from business. He married (1) Oct. 1, 1851, Clara Ann Shatwell. of Manchester, England, who died at Easton, Pa., June 6, 1868, aged 37, and was buried in Easton Cemetery.
    They had:
    (I.) Stanley Leigh, b. Easton, Pa., Oct. 12, 1853.
    (II.) Ada Vickers, b. Easton, Pa., Aug, 28, 1857.
    (III.) Hattie Grove, b. Easton, Pa., Nov. 29, 1859; m. Dec. 19, 1882, Joseph H. Evans, of Easton ; d. Jersey City, Jan. 31, 1891, and was buried in Easton Cemetery.
    (IV.) Clara Ann, b. Easton, Pa., March 14, 1862: m. Nov. 20, 1890, Joseph R. Hixson, of Elizabeth, N. J.
    (V.) Lucy Fisher, b. Easton, Pa., Nov. 14, 1864.

    Samuel Leigh(4) married (2) Nov. 16, 1869, Mary Elizabeth Rinek, of Easton, Pa. Samuel Leigh Rodenbough died at Easton, Pa., Nov. 28, 1885, and was buried in the Easton Cemetery.
    They had:
    VI. Emily Chidsey, b. Easton, Pa., Dec. 22, 1870.

    John Hockenberry(4) (Herbert(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born Aug. 1, 1785. Educated in village school and became a farmer. He married. May, 1804, Sarah Smith of Hunterdon County, N. J., and died at Canton, Ill., May 1, 1865.
    They had:
    (I.) George Smith, b. Bethlehem, N. J., Sept. 25, 1805 ; m. July 28, 1825, Elizabeth Jackson, of Clinton, N. J., and had 12 children.
    (II.) Herbert, b. Bethlehem, N. J., Nov. 30, 1806; m. Feb. 11, 1826, Margaret Smith, of Lebanon, N. J.
    (III.) Elizabeth, b. Bethlehem, N. J., June 24, 1808; m. Oct. 22, 1825, Daniel Jones, of Lebanon, N. J.
    (IV.) Rebecca, b. Lebanon, N. J., July 30, 1810; m. Jan, 1, 1829, Henry M. Hammer, of Dryden, N. Y.
    (V.) Mary, b. Lebanon, N. J., Jan. 24, 1813; m. Feb. 22, 1840, John Sellard.
    (VI.) Henry Smith, b. Bethlehem, N. J., Dec. 8, 1814; m. Dec. 26, 1840, Elizabeth Keely, of Montgomery County, Pa.
    (VII.) Josiah, b. Lebanon, N. J., Feb. 16, 1817; m. Nov. 13, 1839, Mary McElroy, of Warren County, N. J.
    (VIII.) Sarah Ann, b. Lebanon, N. J., May 4, 1820; m. April 18, 1837, Wesley McClary; d. Philadelphia, April 4, 1866.
    (IX.) John Calvin, b. Lebanon, N. J., Dec. 4, 1821; m. Nov. 2, 1841, Letty Ann Apgar, of Bethlehem, and had 2 children.
    (X.) Susan Martha, b. Lebanon, N. J., May 3, 1823; m. James Hedden, of Hunterdon County, N. J..
    (XI.) Euphemia Miller, b. Lebanon, N. J., April 29, 1825; m. Nov. 30, 1845, Nathaniel Wright, of Clinton, N. J., and had 5 children.
    (XII.) Dorcas Adaline, b. Dryden, N. J., Jan. 29, 1827; m. July 6, 1850, John Allen Todd, of Somerset County, N. J., and had 6 children,
    (XIII.) Lydia Caroline, b. Clinton, N.J., Jan. 12, 1832; m. March 5, 1857, Robert Curry Snyder, of Canton, 111., and had 2 children.

    FIFTH GENERATION
    Theophilus Francis(5) (Charles(4), Henry(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born at Easton, Pa., Nov. 5, 1838. He attended private schools, had special tutors and took a course of mathematics and English literature at Lafayette College (1856-57). Upon the outbreak of the War for the Union, President Lincoln (at the request of the Hon. Andrew H. Reeder) appointed him (March 27, 1861) a Second Lieutenant in the Second U. S. Dragoons. He served (1861-62) as Post Adjutant and Quartermaster U.S. Cavalry School of Practice, Carlisle, Pa., and with his regiment in all the campaigns of the Army of the Potomac (1862-64). Promoted First Lieutenant (1861) and Captain (July 17, 1862); he was slightly wounded and had two horses shot under him at Beverly Ford, Va. (June 9, 1863), the great cavalry fight in which nearly 20,000 Union and Confederate cavalry crossed sabers. He commanded his regiment at Gettysburg, having two horses killed during that campaign ; was severely wounded at Trevillian Station, Va. (June II, 1864), and, while in command of his regiment, lost his right arm and had his horse killed at the battle of "The Opequan." Va. (Sept. 19, 1864). Upon the recommendation of General Sheridan he was granted leave of absence, from the Regular Army, to accept the Colonelcy of the 18th Pennsylvania Cavalry, and (July, 1865), by direction of the President was specially assigned, with the rank of Brigadier-General, to command a brigade (consisting of regulars and volunteers) and the District of Clarksburg, W. V. He was honorably mustered out of the volunteer service, October 31, 1865. He served during the winter of 1865 as Inspector General "U. S. Forces in Kansas and the Territories" with headquarters at Fort Leavenworth, and later, with the 2d Cavalry at Fort Ellsworth, Ks. Upon the reorganization of the Army he was appointed Major (July 28, 1866) of the new 42d U. S. Infantry, commanding it and the posts of Plattsburg and Madison Barracks, N. Y. (1866-69); also serving on various boards for the selection of a magazine gun, the examination of officers, and the investigation of the case of the first colored cadet at West Point. He received brevets to the rank of Brigadier-General U. S. Army, "for gallant and meritorious services" at the battles, respectively, of " Trevillian Station," "the Opequan," "Todd's Tavern" and "Cold Harbor,"
    Va., and was, at his own request, retired from active service, Dec. 15, 1870, "with the full rank (colonel of cavalry) of the command held when wounded." In recommending this officer for his highest brevet, General Sheridan wrote to the War Department as follows: "Colonel Rodenbough was one of the most gallant and valuable young officers, under my command, in the Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac. He was constantly in the field with his regiment, the 2d U. S. Cavalry (a portion of the time in command of it), from the spring of '62 up to the time of his being wounded whilst gallantly leading his regiment at the battle of the Opequan, September 19, 1864."
    Military Commissions: Second Lieut. 2nd U. S. Dragoons, March 27, 1862; First Lieut. May 14, 1861; Capt. 2nd U. S. Cavalry, July 17, 1862 Colonel 18th Penna. Vol. Cav., April 29, 1865; Major 42nd U. S. Infantry, July 28, 1866. Breveted as follows: Major, "battles of Trevillian Station, and Opequan, Va."; Lieut. -Colonel, U. S. A., " during the War" ; Colonel, U. S. A., "battle of Todd's Tavern, Va."; Brigadier-General, U. S. V.. "during the War"; Brigadier-General, U. S. A., "battle of Cold Harbor, Va."; Asst. Inspector-General, S. N. Y. (1879-82)

    BATTLES
    1862: "New Bridge, Va." (May 2); "Manassas" or "Second Bull Run" (Aug. 29-30). 1863; "Stoneman Raid" (April 23-30); "Beverly Ford" (June 9) slightly wounded; "Aldie" (June 17); "Middleburg" (June 18); "Upperville" (June 27); "Gettysburg, Pa." (July 1-3); "Williamsport" (July 6); "Boonesboro, Md." (July 8); "Funkstown" (July 10); "Falling Waters" (July 14); "Manassas Gap, Va." (July 21); "Brandy Station" (Aug. 1-2); " Culpeper C. H." (Sept. 13); "Bristoe Station" (Oct.).
    1864: "The Furnaces" (May 6); "Todd's Tavern" (May 8); "Ground Squirrel Bridge" (May 10); "Yellow Tavern" (May 11); "Meadow Bridge" (May 12); "Hawes' Shop" (May 28); "Old Church" (May 30); "Cold Harbor" (May 31-June 1); "Trevillian Station" (June 11-12) severely wounded; "Winchester" or "the Opequan" (Sept. 19) severely wounded.

    RETIREMENT
    Occupation After Retirement : Deputy Governor U. S. Soldiers' Home, Washington, D. C. (1870-71); General Eastern Agent, Pullman Car Co. (1872-73); Associate Editor Army and Xavy Journal (1876-77); Corresponding Secretary, Society Army of the Potomac (1878) ; Secretary and Editor of the Journal (1878-90) and Vice-President (1891-3) Military Service Institution of the United States; Chief of the Bureau of Elections, City of New York (1890-2); author of several essays, sketches and the following books: "From Everglade to Canon with the Second Dragoons" (1875); "Afghanistan or the Anglo-Russian Dispute" (1882); "Uncle Sam's Medal of Honor" (1887); "The Bravest Five Hundred of 'Sixty-one" (1891), and "Autumn Leaves from Family Trees" (1891).

    He married, Sept. 1, 1868 (at the Church of the Incarnation, N. Y. City, by Rt. Rev. W. H. Odenheimer, D.D., Bishop of New Jersey, assisted by the Rector, Rev. Henry Montgomery, D.D.), Elinor Frances, daughter of Passed Midshipman James Foster, U. S. N., and granddaughter of the late Rear Admiral John Berrien Montgomery, U. S. N..
    They had:
    (I.) Mary McCullagh, b. Detroit, Mich., Jan. 7, 1870 ; d. New York, Feb. 11, 1872.
    (II.) James Foster, b. Washington; D. C, Aug. 7, 1871 ; educated at Dr. Callisen's Academy, N. Y. City, St. Austin's School, Staten Island, and by special tutors. Is engaged (1891) as a member of Civil Engineer Corps of Lehigh Valley R. R. Co. (Pennsylvania.)
    (III.) Nina, b. New York, Oct. 8, 1874; educated at St. Mary's P. E. School (1881), Miss Comstock's Seminary (1888-89) in New York City, and at Bishopthorpe School, Bethlehem, Pa. (1890-91).

    Joseph Kinnersley Swift(5) (Charles(4), Henry(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born at Easton, Pa., Dec. 24, 1841. He was educated at private schools, and at an early age entered the counting room of Rodenbough and Brother, of Easton, Pa., and Phillipsburg, N. J. In 1862, his health being impaired by confinement in an office, he joined a party of civil engineers and assisted in the survey and construction of a part of the Lehigh Valley Railroad. In 1865 he became a member of the firm of Rodenbough Brother and Son, wholesale dealers in iron, coal and provisions (a business house founded by his father in 1832), from which he withdrew (upon the dissolution of the firm) in. He was a member of the " Easton Grays," P. N. G., became a Director of the Easton Bank (1882), Easton Cemetery, Northampton Mutual Fire Insurance Co., Easton Trust Co., President of the "Crypt" and Pomfret Clubs, Trustee of St. Luke's Hospital, Bethlehem, Pa., and is (1891) President of the Lehigh Water Company. Possessing an inherited taste for the mechanic arts, together with conservative but progressive business methods, personal tact and great energy, Mr. Rodenbough has been conspicuously connected with the improvement of his native town. He was one of the pioneers in promoting the development of the northern section of that city, particularly in the establishment and extension of the Paxinosa Improvement Company, of which he is (1891) President and General Manager. He married, October 5, 1865 (by Rev. C. H. Edgar, D.D.), Emily Harriet, third daughter of Russell S. Chidsey, Esq., of Easton, Pa. (See " Chidsey.")
    They had:
    (I.) Charles Russell, b. Easton, Pa., June 26, 1867; entered Lafayette College (class of 1888), taking Latin scientific course; became (1891) a manufacturer; m. April 15, 1891, Lillian H. Seitz, of Easton, Pa.
    (II.) Albert Churchman, b. Easton, Pa., July 4, 1870; educated at Easton High School and graduated at Lafayette College (1892).
    (III.) Frances Josephine, b. Easton, Pa., Feb. 25, 1875; educated at Miss Porter's School, Farmington, Conn. (1891-)

    Henry Smith(5) (John H.(4), Herbert(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born at Bethlehem, N. J.. June 24, 1808. He was educated at common schools and at Lafayette College (1840). After teaching school for a season, he was duly ordained a minister of the Gospel and, for forty-five years, was the pastor of the Providence Presbyterian Church at Trappe, Pa. He married, Dec. 26, 1840, Elizabeth Keely of Montgomery County, Pa. (b. Nov. 3, 1815). He died at Norristown, Pa., May 3, 1890.
    They had :
    (I.) Theodore Frelinghuysen, b. Sept. 14, 1844; m. Sept. 14, 1863 ; d. Norristown, Pa., Feb. 27, 1885.
    (II.) Adelia, b. March 18, 1847.
    (III.) Willie Crawford, b. May 17, 1850 ; d. July 19, 1851.
    (IV.) John Ner, b. Sept. 11, 1852 ; d. Dec. 30, 1862.
    (V.) Elizabeth Ann, b. Sept. 9, 1855 ; d. Aug. 2, 1856,
    (VI.) Hannah Crawford, b. June 16, 1857 ; d. Dec. 24, 1862.

    SIXTH GENERATION
    Theodore Frelinghuysen(6) (Henry S.(5), John H.(4), Herbert(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born at Trappe, Pa., Sept. 14, 1844. He was educated by his father, and taught school for a short time; Deputy Recorder of Deeds, Norristown, Pa. (1872-78); bookseller and stationer (1878-84) ; Clerk of Council 1883-84, and Adjutant 51st Regiment, Penna. National Guard (1877). He was also a good musician, a member of Curtis Lodge 239, L O. O. F., of Consonance Chamber, O. K. F., and a citizen "whose sterling integrity won for him universal esteem." He married, Sept. 14, 1863, Margaretta Smith Shepps (b. Germany, Dec. 19, 1835), and died at Norristown, Feb. 27, 1885.
    They had:
    (I.) John Ner (b. Norristown, Pa., July 10, 1864; d. Aug. 11, 1864).
    (II.) Henry Shepps (b. Norristown, Pa., Dec. 14, 1868).
    (III.) George Smith (b. Norristown, Pa., Feb. 21. 1871).

    EASTON TO NEW ORLEANS IN 1825
    THE following extracts from the Diary of Charles Rodenbough of Easton, Pa., are interesting as indicating the primitive traveling facilities of the time and the impressions of a young American tourist in search of health and information.

    Nov. 8, 1895 At 12 o'clock left Bidlemansville, embarked on a Durham boat, for Trenton, and descended the Delaware twenty-seven miles.

    Nov. 9. Arrived at Trenton in time to secure passage on the steamboat to Philadelphia, where I landed at half past 5 p. m.

    Nov. 15. Having yesterday secured a seat in the mail stage for Pittsburgh, was awakened this morning at three o'clock to occupy it; got up with some unwillingness, as I had been to the circus, with C. I. Ihrie, the preceding evening. Although I left it at half past nine, it was nearly twelve o'clock before I got to sleep, in consequence of being obliged to overhaul my trunks and repack them after I came in from the circus. The performance was good. Upon taking my seat this morning, I found the company to consist of two gentlemen and two German ladies and their children ; all five unable to speak or understand a single word of English, and ourselves quite as ignorant of the German, really a cheering prospect for a day's ride of 100 miles! This, however, made no difference to the driver, for as soon as the old town-clock had counted four he drove us off at the rate of five miles per hour, and, ere the sun had gilded the east, we found ourselves fifteen miles from the city. Four o'clock found us dining in Lancaster, 64 miles from where we started, and eleven o'clock of the same evening set us down in Harrisburg, one hundred miles from Philadelphia; sleepy and tired and as ignorant of the German language as we were in the morning, notwithstanding the children kept up a constant chattering, sometimes singing, sometimes crying.

    Nov. 16. Left Harrisburg this morning at 8 o'clock, crossed the Susquehanna River on a bridge about a mile in length. The town is beautifully situated on its eastern bank in the midst of an extensive plain, has a number of handsome buildings, among which is the Capitol, built of brick, on a very commanding eminence near the river; the town, in size, is very like Easton. After passing through Carlisle and Shippensburg (the first a very handsome town nearly as large as Harrisburg, with better buildings, the last much smaller and in no way interesting) I arrived at Chambersburg, a distance of fifty miles, the last thirty-two of which I was the only and lonely passenger. The appearance of the country, through which the road passes, is very like that between Easton and Bethlehem.

    Nov. 17. Was called, at 3 o'clock this morning, to take my seat in the stage; after my baggage was in, and I was ready to start, inquired for my cloak; it was not to be found, the servant who took charge of it, when I came, could give no account of it. I directed him to inform the landlord of my determination not to leave until my cloak, or another as good, was produced. He made his appearance soon after and found that one of his boarders was absent, and in all probability had made a mistake and had taken my cloak instead of his own. As there appeared to be one without an owner, I proposed taking that for mine, to which he eventually consented. Fortunately it was rather better than my own, so that I had no reason to regret the change. When I got in the stage found myself the only passenger. The first ten miles was through a dreary country with here and there a solitary cabin in the bushes; being dark and very cloudy added to the general gloom, and several times induced me to think of mail robbers, and, at the same time, lay my hand involuntarily upon my pistol-belt to know how I was prepared for an attack of that kind, and finally prevailed so far as to make me think of a place of safety for my pocketbook; having some room in my boot-leg, I slipped it in and carried it there all day. Daylight brought the stage to the foot of the mountain, the ascent of which is four miles, and the descent as long; from the top I had one of the finest views I ever beheld; the perpendicular height of this mountain cannot be less than twelve hundred feet above the adjoining plain, on the eastern side upon which the town of Chambersburg is situated. It has about the same amount of population that Easton has, though much more the characteristics of a city; such, for instance, as those of a town-clock, and a night watch who parade the streets as regularly as those of Philadelphia. Soon after daylight this morning, the loneliness of my situation was relieved by the addition of two gentlemen from Nashville, in the State of Tennessee, who were returning to that place; in consequence of which I think myself fortunate, as they will travel my route at least 600 miles. I rode fifty miles this day over a very hilly country to a small town called Bedford, where I arrived about dark and had the satisfaction to find good accommodations; after being furnished with a good supper and while sitting round the fire in our room, we were gratified with a few tunes on the piano, by the landlord's daughter, in an adjoining room.

    Nov. 18. We were called to take our seats in the stage at three o'clock this morning, found it snowing and blowing and very cold withal; rode twenty miles to breakfast on the top of the Allegheny Mountains, after which continued our journey over the hills and through the storm, fifty miles further, to Greensburg, making seventy miles this day; the whole of which was performed over a road of constant hills, some of which were three miles from bottom to top; arriving between 8 and 9 o'clock.

    Nov. 19. We took our departure this morning at 4 o'clock. Rode twelve miles to breakfast, soon after which we passed the ever memorable battle ground, on which General Braddock was defeated and killed by the Indians, about twelve miles south of Pittsburgh; at which city we had the pleasure of finding ourselves safely landed, at 12 o'clock, after a rough ride of 300 miles, from Philadelphia, performed in four and a half days. Took lodgings at the Mansion House, kept by Col. Ramsay. During the afternoon took occasion to view the town, and present one of my introductory letters, which made me acquainted with a gentleman who, among other civilities, gave me an invitation to go to Church with him to-morrow, it being Sunday. Found the town just what you supposed New Orleans was, namely, very smoky and of course very dirty, occasioned by the exclusive use of stove coal for fire, the cheapness of which recommending it in all cases where fire is necessary; the coal delivered at the doors of the inhabitants being but 3 cents per bushel and 16 bushels are considered equal to a cord of oak wood. On account of the great quantity consumed, there is a constant fall of dust in the street; it is in appearance very much like lampblack and gives to the inhabitants, who are exposed in the street, a blacksmith's complexion.

    Nov. 20. At 11 o'clock this morning my new acquaintance called according to promise and took me to Church; when returning said he would call again after dinner, he did so, and went with me to hear an Episcopalian, who gave us as fine a sermon as I have ever heard de livered. During the day was made acquainted with Mrs. McKnight (that is the wife of my friend), with whom I returned from Church and took tea as well as spent the evening very pleasantly.

    Nov. 21. This day I visited the penitentiary, now building on the north side of the Allegheny River, in company with Mrs. McKnight and some ladies of her acquaintance. It is handsomely situated in the midst of a large plain about three hundred yards from the river, and when completed will be an elegant stone structure. Its form is that of a circle of one hundred yards diameter the height about 25 feet, built of freestone; it is intended for solitary confinement, i.e., each culprit will have an apartment to himself; these apartments are built of stone also, and arranged around the inside of the circular wall, ten feet square inside, seven feet high, the top being a stone arch. In the center of this little room is a large iron ring fastened in the floor for the purpose of chaining the prisoner. In crossing from Pittsburgh to this building we passed over the Allegheny bridge, the length of which is nearly half a mile and the height about fifty feet above the water. It is covered like the Easton Bridge, and has a footway on each side of the carriage passage with a partition between which protects the foot passenger from all dust of the wagons. On our return to the city this evening, when descending a steep hill, Miss B., and another lady, attempted to run down, in doing which Miss B. had the misfortune to come against a tree, by which she injured her breast and hand very much; it had like to have made our walk quite an adventure. Miss B. is from Germantown, near Philadelphia. She says Mr. Rodney is very popular in that place.

    Nov. 22, 23 were devoted to the examination of the nail and glass factories; of the latter there is none more extensive in the United States, nor any whose ware has a higher reputation, than this one. I saw some of the most beautiful specimens of cut glass that I have ever witnessed. I visited a paper mill also, the extent of which may be judged of when I say there were one hundred and twenty hands employed, among which were many females and small boys.

    Nov. 24. The forenoon of this day was spent in preparations for my journey to Cincinnati, to which place I am now convinced I shall be obliged to travel by stage, the distance 300 miles. Accordingly, at one o'clock this afternoon, I left this city in the mail stage for Washington, Penn., the company consisting of eleven passengers, four of whom are bound South, one to New Orleans.

    Nov. 25. After a rough ride of 27 miles, eight o'clock last evening set us down in Washington, a neat village, many of the buildings are of brick. It is situated on the National road near the western boundary of Pennsylvania. After three hours' disturbed sleep was called, at one o'clock this morning, to take my seat in the stage for Wheeling in Virginia, distance 30 miles, which we rode in six hours and before breakfast; after that necessary ceremony was performed we crossed the Ohio River in a ferry-boat propelled by two horses; found the river very low and about twice the width of the Delaware. Rode 25 miles in the State of Ohio to Fairview, an insignificant little place with two taverns and not much else.

    Nov. 26. Took my seat in the stage this morning at three o'clock; found a fine frosty moonlight morning; rode 57 miles this day to Zanesville on the Muskingum River, an active, well-built, little town of about one thousand inhabitants. A neat brick Court-house is among the public buildings, and there are a number of handsome dwellings built by the citizens.

    Nov. 27. Sunday. This morning I was permitted to take my breakfast before leaving. At nine o'clock we set off for Lancaster, distant 30 miles, where we arrived about dark. During the day we were gratified with specimens of the Ohio ladies and gentlemen in their Sunday attire, as many of them were going to and returning from Church. In the afternoon I walked on before the stage; while ascending a hill before I was overtaken, I came to a log meeting-house situated in the woods, in which were a congregation listening attentively to a zealous speaker. I had but a few minutes to hear before the stage came up but long enough to be reminded of times gone by.

    Nov. 28. After getting an excellent supper last night and sleeping four hours, we resumed our seats in the mail stage. It being moonlight, I had an opportunity to see the principal street, the buildings upon which are good, a large proportion of them are of brick, and the place has as much the appearance of comfort as any small town through which I have passed. Went eighteen miles, to Circleville, for breakfast; this is a county town, with a Court-house, jail, etc.. and the usual number of inns and stores; remarkable for nothing but the remains of extensive ancient fortifications. Immediately after leaving this place we crossed the Scioto River, a stream much like the Lehigh in size but not so rapid. Our road from here to another county town (30 miles from Circleville) where we arrived soon after sundown, lay through a most beautiful country, being the whole distance and as far as the eye could reach, on either hand, as level as the surface of a lake on a summer morning.

    Nov. 29. Having but twenty-two miles to travel this day, we were permitted to breakfast before we set off. Found the face of the country very similar to that through which we passed yesterday, occasionally finding the tall forest invaded by the hardy back-woods man whose residence and mode of living are rather romantic, though to me not at all enviable. Imagine an opening about the size of a small garden, (made in the midst of an overgrown forest where trees are like church steeples in height, and like hogsheads in the circumference) and in the center of this spot a building, ten or twelve feet square, composed of round logs fastened at the corners, laid up to the height of a man's head, covered with split boards on which large poles are placed to prevent the wind from carrying them off ; to one end of this cabin is attached a chimney made by short logs, being laid up like a pig-pen, and plastered inside with mud, a square hole cut through the logs of the main fabric for a fireplace; in the front another similar hole for a door, with a blanket hanging in the same to keep out the wind. Then another building situated on one side of the clearing constructed the same way and of the same material as those of the dwelling, for a stable and barn, and you will have a tolerably good idea of the usual improvements of a first settler in this, or in fact, of almost any other part of the western country. Notwithstanding, however, the forbidding appearance of this establishment, the traveler will find much of comfort and more of real hospitality reigning within, for the truth of which I can vouch. In the course of this day we passed through an extensive prairie or naturally clear country, upon which there has never been known any timber. They occur, frequently, in traveling through this country. At three o'clock we arrived at Wilmington, another county town and the end of this day's journey; found the place much crowded in consequence of this being Court week. After dinner I stepped into the Court-house to observe the appearance and manners of the natives, of which I found a great concourse, and of course as great a variety. Upon entering the Court-room, I was forcibly reminded of the Court held at Templeton, described in the "Pioneers"; the judges, the lawyers, the audience and the interior of the Court-house, as well as everything connected with it, seemed to be an exact counterpart of that described by Cooper; the effect was so like as almost to induce me to look round for Natty Bumppo, (Leather Stocking), and last, though not least, the interesting "Elisabeth".

    Nov. 30. This morning we took our departure at three o'clock had not gone far before it became very dark and soon after began to rain; about daybreak we crossed the Miami River, at this time an inconsiderable stream, though in certain seasons a large river. Eight o'clock found the stage at Lebanon, a small town, but some good buildings, where we breakfasted, having come 17 miles. After eating and changing horses, we continued our journey 35 miles to Cincinnati, where we arrived in six days from Pittsburgh, considerably fatigued.

    Dec. 1. Found me snugly quartered at Colonel Mack's Hotel, the accommodations at which are of the Philadelphia stamp, and of course draw many visitors, regular boarders as well as travelers, the number of both, I suppose, might be nearly 80 at dinner to-day. Having been favored by a friend in Philadelphia, with a letter of introduction to Mr. Neff, an extensive merchant of this city, I took occasion to present it this morning, and found him extremely polite and attentive in giving me all the information in his possession relative to the subjects upon which I inquired. After learning that a steamboat would leave here to-morrow for Louisville, at the falls of the Ohio River, I devoted the remainder of the day to the examination of the town and its improvements, with which found myself quite satisfied, it being equal to the printed descriptions circulated through the country which nine times out of ten, are much too highly colored, and consequently liable to give the stranger a very erroneous impression. The style of building is very neat and principally of brick, the town is laid out in squares like Philadelphia, and in fact the whole appearance of the place is so like it, that a stranger, transported from one to the other in his sleep would, upon waking, hardly suspect the change of situations, that is as far as this place goes, it being in extent about one-eighth of that of Philadelphia, or about 14,000 souls. The building of steamboats is going on here this winter very extensively. I saw ten or twelve new ones nearly finished, many of them of the first order. Its public buildings are not numerous yet, among them however are several neat Churches and a beautiful Courthouse; the society of the place has the reputation of being very good.

    Dec. 2. After supping with, and spending an evening very pleasantly, at my new acquaintances, I returned to my lodgings at ten o'clock last night with some regret that the nature of business renders a longer stay in this town impracticable; while walking with Mr. N. from his store to his house, he informed me that he had not been long keeping house (having been lately married), his furniture was not all received from Philadelphia, and at the same time requested that the absence of it might be excused. Upon entering his parlor, however, I found that, at least, very handsomely if not elegantly furnished; among other articles a very amiable wife was not least attractive. This morning was spent in making arrangements to continue my journey on board the steamboat, which got under way about 10 o'clock and proceeded down the Ohio River at the rate of six miles per hour. The width of the river between the banks varies from a half to one mile, but being very low at this time, is of course much narrower, and at this season of the year presents to the eye of a traveler very little that is interesting. At intervals of three or four miles he sees perhaps a small opening in the tall forest that is to be seen growing up on the rich bottoms and valleys of this noble river, and here and there a little village starting up, as it were, out of the stumps. In the course of this afternoon we passed the residence of General Harrison, of Indian War memory, situated near the bank of the river; buildings of brick and neat in appearance.

    Dec. 3. Sometime in the night a part of our machinery failed, and we were obliged, in consequence, to cast anchor in the middle of the river and there to remain all day for repairs.

    Dec. 4. When I awoke this morning, I found we were again in motion and about 12 o'clock arrived at Zanesville, in Kentucky, a very active place nearly as large as Easton. The buildings larger and mostly of brick, situated at the falls of the Ohio, 150 miles below Cincinnati and 330 from the Mississippi, following the course of the Ohio River. Here our worst foreboding was realized as regarded our mode of conveyance to the mouth of the Ohio; finding the water too low for steamboat navigation, myself and seven others engaged two carnages with four horses each, to carry us to the mouth of Cumberland River, 250 miles from this place.

    Dec. 5. I spent this day in viewing the town and steamboats at the landing, many of them very fine ones; altogether not less than ten or twelve were waiting for high water.

    Dec. 6. About one o'clock, this day, we took our seats in the carriages for the mouth of Cumberland, four in each; the four of us who had traveled in company for the last 400 miles, filled one, and four strangers the other; went 23 miles, through a level but new country, and stopped for the night.

    Dec. 7. Rose early this morning and drove on over a very hilly country, without any improvements, till twelve o'clock, for our breakfast; great complaints at the length of the road as well as anxiety for breakfast; after hurrying the landlord, we were permitted to sit down to a purely Kentucky meal; our bread was made of corn meal coarsely ground, and not sifted, mixed with water, baked in round cakes about the size of a dinner plate and two inches thick. With this we had liver and beefsteak fried to a crisp, strong coffee without cream, and no butter.

    Dec. 8. This morning we discovered that we might secure a better breakfast than we had yesterday, and accordingly took it before we departed, and before sunrise were on the way; rode about 40 miles and halted for the night. Soon after dark it commenced to rain; retired not without apprehension for the comfort of to-morrow's ride.

    Dec. 9. Quite surprised this morning to find it clear and rather cold; drove 35 miles this day, during which we passed through "Bowling Green," a little village of about 100 houses, and halted at sundown in "Shaker-town," inhabited and owned, together with the adjoining country, entirely by the Shakers (no doubt you recollect the description given of this singular and infatuated people by the author of "Redwood"). They have a community here of about 800 persons and these all grown or nearly so. Their creed not allowing them to marry, they have no children of their own; the men and women occupy different apartments for sleeping, calling each other Sister and Brother; many of their habits resemble those of the Moravians particularly in neatness and regularity; everything goes on like clockwork, it is all "yea," "yea " and "nay," "nay," with them. They are building two very large and beautiful brick houses for the accommodation of themselves in two families, a Sister's House and Brother's House. The supper and breakfast reminded me of New Jersey living. Supposing the opportunity a good one, I requested mush and milk to be put on the supper table, which, with an excellent apple pie made it seem like my late home.

    Dec. 10. This day we rode near forty miles, the weather quite cold, country thinly settled but with good roads. In order to pass away the time, as fast and pleasantly as possible, each contributed what he could by relating what he had heard and seen on his course through this "Vale of Tears." One of my companions was from near Albany, going to close some unfinished business in Louisiana, where he had spent ten years of his life; a second was a merchant now established at Memphis, a little village on the banks of the Mississippi in the State of Tennessee, but who had spent several years in the service of his country among the Indians; the third was also a merchant of the same place but younger than either of the others, and of course had not so much to regale us with, but being quite intelligent and having experienced some adventures, he excited, occasionally, our attention. I recollect one instance in particular: being the son of General Winchester, who was in command during the late War, he was taken into the service when about sixteen years of age, and underwent many hardships for one so young; he said that at the encampment of the American Army on the river Raisin, near Detroit, he became acquainted with a French girl, of about the same age as himself, who soon succeeded in gaining a place in his affections. The quarters of his father, the General, being at the house of the French girl's father, gave him frequent opportunities to indulge his partiality for the company of the daughter; but, "the course of true love never runs smooth," for the Americans were attacked at their encampment in the night by a superior force of British and Indians, whose bullets on the roof of the Frenchman's house were the first indication of danger to our young soldier. His first thought was of his fair one (this he declared to us himself, it is not my invention) and flew directly to her chamber, knowing where she slept, but when he burst in, what was his disappointment to find it deserted by her whom he wished to serve; she having, as he supposed, taken the alarm sooner than himself, and fled from her window, whither, he was never able to learn, nor her fate; but that of her father was certain, as he soon after saw his lifeless body lying on the ground near his former dwelling; the conflict soon became sharp and he found it necessary to look out for his own safety. The fortune of the day made him a prisoner, and wounded his father; this you will say, and say truly, is a long story and badly told.

    Dec. 11. Our road this day carried us through Hopkinsonville, a considerable village; rode 20 miles before breakfast and 20 after. which brought us to Princeton, a poor looking little town, though in a fine looking country; the tavern at which we stopped is a huge brick castle with an empty inside.

    Dec. 12. When we arose this morning found the snow had fallen three inches deep during the night; got a cup of coffee and drove 12 miles for our breakfast; having had corn bread for supper last night we thought ourselves happy when we saw miserable buckwheat cakes on the table this morning. Thirteen miles after breakfast brought us to Salem, a little town of about 50 houses, where we were glad to put up for the night, it being dark and most intolerably cold. After an excellent supper we retired for the night. This was the first place where we were annoyed by gambling.

    Dec. 13. After securing a very good breakfast we set off at nine o'clock, and, riding and walking 15 miles up and down hill, we found ourselves at the mouth of Cumberland River, 60 miles from the Mississippi. We decided upon rowing down the Ohio in a small boat which we soon bought and stored with two days' provisions, and at dark found ourselves five miles down the Ohio River; got lodging on a steamboat that was lying at the shore.

    Dec. 14. The coldness of my feet compelled me to rise early this morning and sunrise found us all on board our little bark, taking tours, by twos, of half an hour each; it being very cold, it was with difficulty that we kept ourselves from freezing; enjoyed our situation very much until after sunset, when it first occurred to us that we might have to take up our lodging, by a fire, on the bank of the river for the night, as we could not see any house. We of course looked out in good earnest for a light on the shore, and after rowing half an hour discovered, to our great joy, a log cabin on the bank, where we landed. Having come 30 miles this day, we were all much fatigued by rowing, and were very glad to get a place before the fire to lie down on the floor of the rudest cabin you ever saw inhabited.

    Dec. 15. Loud complaints were common this morning when we attempted to rise, on account of stiff joints; took breakfast and embarked on board our boat, and at three o'clock this afternoon arrived where we expected to meet a steamboat, but to our great disappointment there was none there.

    Dec. 16. Having now arrived within six miles of the Mississippi we supposed it would not be long before we should have the sight of a steamboat, and to avoid loss of time took passage on board of a "keel boat" that was going down the Mississippi, knowing that we could exchange our mode of conveyance whenever a steamboat might overtake us; in two hours we arrived at the Mississippi and found it so full of ice as to prevent our entering it.

    Dec. 17. After being ice bound, for two days, we, this morning, determined to venture out and try it. After arranging our force as necessity required, we launched forth into the stream and soon found ourselves employed, some in rowing and some in pushing off large cakes of ice by which we were now surrounded on all sides; a prospect anything but pleasing, as we were liable to be forced upon the snags, of which there was any quantity, and if we were, our fate was almost certain destruction. After navigating our boat ten or twelve miles, in a state of constant anxiety, and being much fatigued, it was deemed advisable to land, which was effected with great difficulty and some murmuring, there being a number in favor of continuing under way. Having landed on the Missouri shore, many of us took the opportunity of setting feet on its prolific soil and, thereby, enabling us to say we had been in the "State of Missouri." After ranging about through the forest until we were satisfied, we returned to the boat and found we had two, first-rate, flute performers among our number, who regaled us after supper with some excellent music. While the table was clearing off, I found that cards was to be the order of the evening; for of fifteen of us there were but two besides myself that did not play. Having been together two or three days, I have ascertained that our company consists of four Frenchmen, one doctor, one lawyer and a dozen merchants-with three married ladies and one spinster, children, servants, etc., etc.

    Dec. 18. This day we made but three or four miles, having headwind, as well as ice, to contend with. The banks of the river look very wild, not even a cabin for many miles, nothing but a close forest, growing to the edge of the bank, which is generally 50 feet high and yet is often over flown; and, when that happens, the water extends many miles from the river, as the banks are higher at the water than any other place.

    Dec. 22. The last two days were passed as the two preceding, gaining only 10 to 12 miles each day, with great exertion, the passengers taking turns at the oars, with the exception of three or four lazy fellows who always have some trifling excuse. This evening there was some dissatisfaction on account of our captain refusing to land at sundown; it got so high that one of the passengers struck the captain and threatened to throw him overboard if he did not permit the pilot
    to land immediately; the passengers seemed to have command of the boat, for the pilot was obliged to land agreeably to their wishes.

    Dec. 28. The last six days have passed as those last described with the exception of having no ice to contend with for the last two in consequence of which we made 25 or 30 miles each day. Last night we landed at an Indian encampment of some half a dozen families; we went to see them and found that they were picking cotton for a planter, their condition and appearance were miserable indeed; one of our company, the son of General Winchester, was able to converse with them, in their own language, which made our visit more interesting. This morning found us at Memphis, a little town that has lately sprung up and promises to become a place of some consequence. We have now been out on the Mississippi 10 or 12 days, and have run but 250 miles to this place and have yet 750 to New Orleans. About 4 o'clock we were gratified with the welcome sight of a steamboat, a few miles behind us, and in fifteen minutes had the pleasure of being taken off our uncomfortable as well as tedious boat by the steamboat Magnet, Captain Bickworth. We were so much pleased that we could not eat our supper; we now have a prospect of arriving at the end of our journey in the course of four or five days.

    Dec. 30. Yesterday we ran 100 miles; this day it has been snowing and blowing incessantly, notwithstanding which we shall run over a hundred miles from daylight to dark; we find ourselves very much crowded, there being about 40 cabin passengers and only twenty beds; of course we, who came on board last, fare worst. Having some acquaintance with the clerk I succeeded in getting a settee, upon which, rolled up in my cloak, I reposed in wakefulness, during the greater part of the night while some less fortunate are obliged to take
    their rest on the floor.

    Dec. 31. This day we passed the wreck of a steamboat that a few days since, on her way up the river, ran against a snag and sank in a few minutes; no lives lost. It has been quite cold all day.

    Jan. I, 1826. This morning introduces us to a new year, whether happy or otherwise, time alone can determine; be that as it may, allow me to wish you a new year of happiness and disappointments few. At 10 o'clock we arrived at Natchez, a handsome town on the banks of the river, 300 miles above New Orleans. Its situation is beautiful and in appearance healthy, but it has just recovered from the yellow fever, which has raged here for many weeks this season, and been more fatal than at New Orleans.

    Jan. 3. This morning at 8 o'clock we discovered the city and in one hour afterwards were landed alongside of this celebrated place, so long the object of our anxiety.

    Jan. 14. I have now been here ten days, during which I have presented my letters of introduction and collected necessary information to enable me to decide that there is no commercial inducement to remain here all winter; my letters being, fortunately, to some of the most respectable merchants in this city, I have had a good opportunity to make enquiry; from all I have been able to collect I am convinced that my time will be of more service at the North, in the spring, than here, and have, therefore, concluded to take passage for New York in the brig Ave Maria, Captain Wood.

    A MOTHER IN ISRAEL
    THERE are lives, unnoticed by the many, with little to the general eye that is remarkable in them, that yet are full of precious fruits. There are lives, whose stream scarce disturbed by a ripple seems almost motionless, that bear refreshing and enriching influences wherever they touch. There are lives, the tenor of whose way is quiet, even, calm, simple, noiseless, that give forth to the attentive ear strains of sweetest melody, lessons which speak of the love of heaven. The life of Mrs. Charles Rodenbough, now at rest, was such an one. Undemonstrative and retiring, to appreciate her worth one had need to know her well and nearly; and one, who so knew her, will bear such respect to the memory of her modest, shrinking disposition as to make his words few, and free from a praise that would offend her living.

    Emily Cauffman Rodenbough, daughter of Laurence and Sarah Shewell Cauffman, was born at Philadelphia, on May 6, 1806; she was baptized in the Roman communion, but confirmed by the Right Rev. Dr. Onderdonk, Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Pennsylvania, at Christ Church, Philadelphia. In the same parish church, on May 16, 1836, her marriage with Charles Rodenbough was solemnized, by the Rev. John Waller James. Her married life and the days of her widowhood were mainly passed in the Borough of Easton, where, on Monday of last week, the 11th of December, 1876, after a brief but distressing illness, surrounded by her devoted family, she departed this life to enter upon her life eternal.

    Mrs. Rodenbough was a devoted and earnest member of Trinity Church in this borough. From her earliest years she had learned to love its holy ways, its blessed services and its sacred seasons.

    She lived in Jesus, and now she rests in Him. He, only, knows how hardly she attained, and through what troubles was made perfect. But we have seen, and can testify, that her daily course amongst us here was beautiful with the loves and graces of a Christly character, and her life abounded with the new works of the Gospel, the works that spring out of a lively faith. Her nature was wondrously cheerful and cheering. Her sympathy was ever fresh and full and true. Was any sick? Her heart ached for all their pains. Was any troubled her spirit, too, was vexed until they found relief. Her constant rule, the law of her heart, seemed to rejoice with them that did rejoice, and to weep with them that wept. Many were the needy whom her shy bounty relieved, many the afflicted whom her tender kindness cheered. It was not in her to wait for the necessitous to press their wants upon her ; she would seek out the needy cause, and in all her giving was seen the delicacy of the Christian lady. We doubt not that her prayers and her alms have gone up for a memorial before God. and now she finds the treasures which she had laid up in heaven. Singularly esteemed by all who called her friend, cherished with deep affection by her kindred, she filled, as few can excel, all the natural relations of life; and now, all her earthly labors past, she enters upon the work of those ministering spirits, who delighting to do God's will, excel in strength, and "circle His throne, rejoicing."

    For we have a good hope; nay, we have a blessed assurance, that she died in the Lord. Absent from us, she is present with Him. which is far better. So let her rest, on whose fresh grave we would cast a garland twined with flowers that tell of a love which never shall decay. When Christ, who is our life, shall appear, then shall she also appear with Him in glory. Yet we love to dwell upon the sweetness of her memory. It blossoms, as the seed of her glorified body is planted in the bosom of the earth. "Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of His saints." God grant that the remembrance of her life may be powerful with those who loved her, calling them to forsake the sin she hated, to follow her in the path she trod, to the rest where she has
  • Note:
    RODENBOUGH, variously spelled RODENBACH, RODENBOCK or RODENBOUGH, is a name of German origin signifying "red brook". An influential family by the name of RODENBACH flourished in Silesia in the XV century. Silesia is a historical region of Central Europe located mostly in Poland, with smaller parts also in the Czech Republic, and Germany. Silesia is rich in mineral and natural resources, and includes several important industrial areas. Silesia's largest city and historical capital is Wroclaw. Other large cities are Opole and Katowice in Poland, Ostrava and Opava in the Czech Republic, Görlitz in Germany. Its main river is the Oder (in German; in Polish and Czech: Odra).

    Silesia's borders and national affiliation have changed radically over time, both when it was a hereditary possession of noble houses and after the rise of modern nation-states. The first known states to hold power there were those of Greater Moravia at end of 9th century and Bohemia early in the 10th century. In the 10th century Silesia was incorporated into the early Polish state, but it later broke into independent duchies, coming under increasing Czech and German influence. It came under the rule of the Crown of Bohemia, which passed to the Austrian Habsburg Monarchy in 1526. Most of Silesia was conquered by Prussia in 1742, later becoming part of the German Empire and German Reich up to 1945. After World War I (1918) the easternmost part of this region was awarded to Poland by the victorious Allies after rebellions by Silesian Polish people and a plebiscite. After World War II (1945) the bulk of Silesia was transferred to Polish jurisdiction and become legally and politically part of Poland. Meanwhile the remaining small parts of Silesia mostly went to Czechoslovakia after World War I, and are now in the Czech Republic.

    The names of RODENBERG, RODENBURG and RODENBORCH of Dutch origin may be found in the Colonial Records of the State of New York. In the year 1649, Lucas Rodenborch (also spelled RODENBURG) was Vice Director at Curagoa to whom consignments of American products were made from New Amsterdam. Remarried Catrine Roeloffse (daughter of the celebrated Anneke Bogardus Jansse) and died in 1656. The early settlement of New Haven, Connecticut, was, under the Dutch rule, known as "Rodenbergh". (All the villages settled by the English, from New Holland or Cape Cod unto Stamford, within the Dutch limits, amount to about thirty, and may be estimated at nearly 5000 persons capable of bearing arms. Among the whole of them the Rodenbergh or New Haven is the principal. It has a Governor, contains about 1340 families and is a province or market of New England. This place was begun eleven years ago in 1638. (Colonial History of New York. V. I, 286.)) On an early map (Noting, 1689) of the New England coast the name of the present Sandy Hook, New York Harbor, is inscribed "Pointe Rodenberg".

    The earliest records at hand show that the first of the name of RODENBOUGH in America settled, about the year 1738-39, in what is now Lebanon, Hunterdon County, New Jersey.

    "From 1682 to 1776 Pennsylvania was the central point of emigration to America from Germany, France and Switzerland. Penn's liberal views and the illiberal course of the government of New York toward the Germans induced many to come to this Province. During the first twenty years (1682-1702) comparatively few Germans arrived, not above two hundred families: they located principally near Germantown. (All male persons above the age of sixteen did repeat and subscribe their names or made their mark to the following declaration: "We subscribers, natives and late inhabitants of the Palatinate upon the Rhine and places adjacent, having transported ourselves and families into this Province of Pennsylvania, a colony subject to the crown of Great Britain, in hope and expectation of finding a retreat and peaceable settlement therein, Do solemnly promise and engage that we will be faithful and bear true allegiance to his present Majesty, King George the Second and his successors, Kings of Great Britain, and will be faithful to the proprietor of this Province; and that we will demean ourselves peaceably to all his said Majesty's subjects, and strictly observe and conform to the Laws of England and of this Province, to the utmost of our power and the best of our understanding." "Rupp's Thirty thousand Names of German, etc., Immigrants, 1727-1776.")

    From 1702 to 1727 nearly 50,000 Germans and other Protestants emigrated to America. In 1705 a number of German Reformed residing near Wolfenbuttel and Halberstadt, fled from religious persecution to Neuwied (Neuwied is a town in the north of the German state of Rhineland-Palatinate, capital of the District of Neuwied. Neuwied lies on the right bank of the Rhine, 12 km northwest of Koblenz, on the railway from Frankfurt am Main to Cologne. The town has 13 suburban administrative districts: Heimbach-Weis, Gladbach, Engers, Oberbieber, Niederbieber, Torney, Segendorf, Altwied, Block, Irlich, Feldkirchen, Heddesdorf, and Rodenbach.), a town of Rhenish Prussia, where they remained some time and then went to Holland, from which they took ship (1707) bound for New York. The vessel was, by reason of adverse winds, carried into the Delaware Bay. Determined, however, to reach their destination, her passengers took the overland route from Philadelphia to New York. On entering the fertile valleys in "Nova Caesaria", now New Jersey, which is drained by the meandering Musconetcong, the Passaic and their tributaries, and having reached a goodly land, they resolved to remain in what is now known as the German Valley of Hunterdon County." These men were principally farmers, of whom Governor Thomas said, in 1738, "This Province has been for some years the asylum of the distressed Protestants of the Palatinate and other parts of Germany; and I believe it may truthfully be said that the present flourishing condition of it is in a great measure owing to the industry of these people; it is not altogether the fertility of the soil but the numbers and industry of the people that makes a country flourish."

    Among those who crossed the ocean to avoid religious persecution was Heinrich Rodenbough, a native of the Palatinate, who arrived at Philadelphia, Sept. 9, 1738, in the ship Glasgow, Walter Sterling, master, from Rotterdam. He settled in the region just described where he found among the neighbors many of his countrymen. Here, after much hard work, he established a modest homestead, accumulated a few acres, a flock or two of sheep and a due proportion of horses and cattle. Fourteen years after his arrival in New Jersey Heinrich was joined by John Peter Rodenbough, his brother. Of the other members of the family, at this date, we are without definite information. The first of whose children there is a family record was:

    BIRTHS, MARRIAGES AND DEATHS

    SECOND GENERATION
    John(2) (supposed to have been the son of Heinrich(1)) and to have been born in Bethlehem Township, Hunterdon County, N. J., about 1740. He married (1763) Elizabeth, daughter of, _______ and died April, 1788. Letters of administration upon his estate were granted to his wife and son John(3). John(2) and Elizabeth Rodenbough had: Elijah(3), Adam(3), Peter(3), John(3), Henry(3), Herbert(3) and William(3).

    THIRD GENERATION
    Henry(3) (John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born near Bethlehem, N. J., July 29, 1768. He was brought up to the life of a farmer, and succeeded to the homestead upon his father's death. He was a faithful disciple of Calvin and became a "Ruling Elder" of the Presbyterian Church. He died at Bethlehem, N. J., Nov. 17, 1836.
    Henry(3) Rodenbough married (1) June, 1790, Ann Young (d. Sept. 1793).
    They had:
    (I.) John, b. March 18, 1791; m. ________ ; d. _________.

    Henry(3) Rodenbough married (2) Aug. 26, 1795, Margaret Brown (b. Nov. 7, 1774; d. New Hampton, N. J., Aug. 15, 1864).
    They had:
    (II.) Charles, b. Oct. 1, 1797; m. May 16, 1836, Emily Cauffman; d. Easton, Pa., Aug. 26, 1872.
    (III.) James, b. July 18, 1800; d. Oct. 1, 1802.
    (IV.) Ann, b. March 6, 1803; d. Oct. 12, 1804.
    (V.) Rachel, b. July 30, 1805 ; m. Joseph King; d. Oct. 12,1866.
    (VI.) Elizabeth, b. June 4, 1808 ; m. Aug. 29, 1834, Ebenezer Wolverton; d. June 15, 1853.
    (VII.) Elijah, b, March 11, 1811 ; m. July, 1840, Elizabeth Anderson; d. Aug. 18, 1862.
    (VIII.) Elisha, b. May 22, 1814; d, Aug. 21, 1819.
    (IX.) Samuel Leigh, b. May 25, 1817; m. (1) Oct. 1, 1851, Clara Ann Shatwell ; (2) Nov. 16, 1869, Mary Elizabeth Rinek; d. Easton, Pa., Nov. 28, 1885.

    Herbert(3) (John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born in Hunterdon County, N. J., about 1769. He married, Oct. 19, 1793, Ann Dils, and died at _______ on ________.
    They had:
    (I.) John Hockenberry, b. Aug. 1, 1785; m. May, 1804, Sarah Smith; d. Canton, Ill., May 1, 1865.
    (II.) Henry
    (III.) Herbert
    (IV.) Morris
    (V.) Margaret
    (VI.) Ann
    (VII.) Sarah
    (VIII.) Elizabeth

    FOURTH GENERATION
    Charles(4) (Henry(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born at Bethlehem, Hunterdon County, N. J., October 1, 1797. He was naturally studious and while at home made the most of his moderate educational advantages. The life of a farmer was not attractive to him, and at the age of twenty-one he accepted a clerkship with a merchant and mill-owner in Greenwich, Warren County, N. J., with whom he subsequently entered into partnership. In 1825 and in 1834 he made flying trips to the South for the benefit of his health, at the same time adding to his information regarding the industrial and commercial growth of the country. In 1830 he entered into the coal, iron and lumber business at Phillipsburg, N. J., and Easton, Pa. (first in partnership with George W. Housel and William Muirheid, and later with his brother, Samuel Leigh, and his son, Joseph Swift); during this period in connection with John Stewart, Esq., he established a rolling mill and wire manufactory at South Easton, a successful enterprise from which he withdrew in 1853; it is said that the first telegraph wire was made at this mill. In 1868 Mr. Rodenbough retired from active business with an ample fortune. He had no political aspirations, and the few offices held by him were unsolicited. He was the first President of the Lehigh Water Company, a Director of the Easton Bank and President of the Board of Trustees of the Presbyterian Church. To an unblemished integrity, high business attainments and respect for law and order, were joined a practical interest in religious and educational matters, and a broad but undemonstrative charity. Charles Rodenbough died at Easton, Pa., August 26, 1872.

    He married at Christ Church, Philadelphia, May 16, 1836, Emily, daughter of Laurence Cauffman, Esq., of that city. (by Rev. John W. James (Mr. James was Asst. Minister of Christ Church for four years preceding his decease, and was elected Rector July 21, 1826, on the death of Bishop White. On the north wall of Christ Church there is a mural tablet with the following inscription: "In memory of the Reverend John Waller James Rector of this Church who died Aug. 14, 1836, aged 31 years. 'I wish to say to the dear people of my charge, Remember the words I spake unto you while I was yet alive. The same truths make me happy in the prospect of death and heaven.'"))
    They had :
    (I.) Theophilus Francis, b. Easton, Pa., Nov. 5, 1838; m, Sept. 1, 1868, Elinor Frances, daughter of James Foster, U. S. N.
    (II.) Joseph Kinnersley Swift, b. Easton, Pa., Dec. 24, 1841; m. Oct. 5, 1865, Emily Holt, daughter of Russell S. Chidsey, Esq., of Easton, Pa.

    Rachel(4) (Henry(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born near Bethlehem, Hunterdon County, N. J., July 24, 1805. She married Joseph King, and died Oct. 12, 1866: he died July 20, 1874.
    They had:
    (I.) Margaret Rodenbough, b, March 5, 1837; d. March 29, 1874.
    (II.) Emily Rodenbough, b. July 13, 1844; d. Dec. 17, 1874.
    (III.) Samuel, b. ______; m. _______.

    Elizabeth(4) (Henry(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born in Bethlehem Township, Hunterdon County, June 4, 1808. She married Aug. 29, 1834, Ebenezer Wolverton, (b. Aug. 17, 1807; d. Union Township, Hunterdon County, N. J., Sept. 5. 1891) and died at the above place June 17, 1853. Mr. Wolverton was a member of the N. J. Legislature (1870's).
    They had:
    (I.) Charles, b. ______; m. _______, Mary Bowlby.
    (II.) Henry, b. April 28, 1839; served during War for the Union in Co. B, 41st N. J. Vols.; d. Belle Plain, Va., April 8, 1863.
    (III.) Jonathan, b. ______; m. _______.
    (IV.) Elisha, b. ______; m. _______. Martha Lunger.
    (V.) Ann Elizabeth, b. ______; m. _______. Joseph Sherer and had one daughter.
    VI. Chester, b. Bethlehem, N. J., Dec. 17, 1850; m. Oct. 25, 1875, Mary M. Hoffman, and had: Thomas C. (b. Aug., 1876) and Edwin R. (b. ______).
    VII. Benjamin, b. ______, 1853; m. ______ Miss Scott, and had one son.

    Elijah(4) (Henry(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born in Bethlehem Township, Hunterdon County, N. J., March 11, 1811. He married, July, 1840, Elizabeth Anderson, and died at Bethlehem, N. J.. Aug. 18, 1862.
    They had:
    (I.) Stewart, b. Sept. 1, 1844; m. Sept. 29, 1869, Anna Sherman, and had: Charles (b. May 12, 1871).
    (II.) George, b. Dec. 6, 1846.
    (III.) Samuel Leigh, b. Oct. 15, 1850; m. _______ Bowlby, and had: William (b. ______).

    Samuel Leigh(4) (Henry(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born at Bethlehem, Hunterdon County, N. J., May 25, 1817. He removed to Easton, Pa., soon after attaining his majority, and, in partnership with his brother Charles, was actively engaged in mercantile pursuits from 1844 to 1869, when on account of failing health he retired from business. He married (1) Oct. 1, 1851, Clara Ann Shatwell. of Manchester, England, who died at Easton, Pa., June 6, 1868, aged 37, and was buried in Easton Cemetery.
    They had:
    (I.) Stanley Leigh, b. Easton, Pa., Oct. 12, 1853.
    (II.) Ada Vickers, b. Easton, Pa., Aug, 28, 1857.
    (III.) Hattie Grove, b. Easton, Pa., Nov. 29, 1859; m. Dec. 19, 1882, Joseph H. Evans, of Easton ; d. Jersey City, Jan. 31, 1891, and was buried in Easton Cemetery.
    (IV.) Clara Ann, b. Easton, Pa., March 14, 1862: m. Nov. 20, 1890, Joseph R. Hixson, of Elizabeth, N. J.
    (V.) Lucy Fisher, b. Easton, Pa., Nov. 14, 1864.

    Samuel Leigh(4) married (2) Nov. 16, 1869, Mary Elizabeth Rinek, of Easton, Pa. Samuel Leigh Rodenbough died at Easton, Pa., Nov. 28, 1885, and was buried in the Easton Cemetery.
    They had:
    VI. Emily Chidsey, b. Easton, Pa., Dec. 22, 1870.

    John Hockenberry(4) (Herbert(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born Aug. 1, 1785. Educated in village school and became a farmer. He married. May, 1804, Sarah Smith of Hunterdon County, N. J., and died at Canton, Ill., May 1, 1865.
    They had:
    (I.) George Smith, b. Bethlehem, N. J., Sept. 25, 1805 ; m. July 28, 1825, Elizabeth Jackson, of Clinton, N. J., and had 12 children.
    (II.) Herbert, b. Bethlehem, N. J., Nov. 30, 1806; m. Feb. 11, 1826, Margaret Smith, of Lebanon, N. J.
    (III.) Elizabeth, b. Bethlehem, N. J., June 24, 1808; m. Oct. 22, 1825, Daniel Jones, of Lebanon, N. J.
    (IV.) Rebecca, b. Lebanon, N. J., July 30, 1810; m. Jan, 1, 1829, Henry M. Hammer, of Dryden, N. Y.
    (V.) Mary, b. Lebanon, N. J., Jan. 24, 1813; m. Feb. 22, 1840, John Sellard.
    (VI.) Henry Smith, b. Bethlehem, N. J., Dec. 8, 1814; m. Dec. 26, 1840, Elizabeth Keely, of Montgomery County, Pa.
    (VII.) Josiah, b. Lebanon, N. J., Feb. 16, 1817; m. Nov. 13, 1839, Mary McElroy, of Warren County, N. J.
    (VIII.) Sarah Ann, b. Lebanon, N. J., May 4, 1820; m. April 18, 1837, Wesley McClary; d. Philadelphia, April 4, 1866.
    (IX.) John Calvin, b. Lebanon, N. J., Dec. 4, 1821; m. Nov. 2, 1841, Letty Ann Apgar, of Bethlehem, and had 2 children.
    (X.) Susan Martha, b. Lebanon, N. J., May 3, 1823; m. James Hedden, of Hunterdon County, N. J..
    (XI.) Euphemia Miller, b. Lebanon, N. J., April 29, 1825; m. Nov. 30, 1845, Nathaniel Wright, of Clinton, N. J., and had 5 children.
    (XII.) Dorcas Adaline, b. Dryden, N. J., Jan. 29, 1827; m. July 6, 1850, John Allen Todd, of Somerset County, N. J., and had 6 children,
    (XIII.) Lydia Caroline, b. Clinton, N.J., Jan. 12, 1832; m. March 5, 1857, Robert Curry Snyder, of Canton, 111., and had 2 children.

    FIFTH GENERATION
    Theophilus Francis(5) (Charles(4), Henry(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born at Easton, Pa., Nov. 5, 1838. He attended private schools, had special tutors and took a course of mathematics and English literature at Lafayette College (1856-57). Upon the outbreak of the War for the Union, President Lincoln (at the request of the Hon. Andrew H. Reeder) appointed him (March 27, 1861) a Second Lieutenant in the Second U. S. Dragoons. He served (1861-62) as Post Adjutant and Quartermaster U.S. Cavalry School of Practice, Carlisle, Pa., and with his regiment in all the campaigns of the Army of the Potomac (1862-64). Promoted First Lieutenant (1861) and Captain (July 17, 1862); he was slightly wounded and had two horses shot under him at Beverly Ford, Va. (June 9, 1863), the great cavalry fight in which nearly 20,000 Union and Confederate cavalry crossed sabers. He commanded his regiment at Gettysburg, having two horses killed during that campaign ; was severely wounded at Trevillian Station, Va. (June II, 1864), and, while in command of his regiment, lost his right arm and had his horse killed at the battle of "The Opequan." Va. (Sept. 19, 1864). Upon the recommendation of General Sheridan he was granted leave of absence, from the Regular Army, to accept the Colonelcy of the 18th Pennsylvania Cavalry, and (July, 1865), by direction of the President was specially assigned, with the rank of Brigadier-General, to command a brigade (consisting of regulars and volunteers) and the District of Clarksburg, W. V. He was honorably mustered out of the volunteer service, October 31, 1865. He served during the winter of 1865 as Inspector General "U. S. Forces in Kansas and the Territories" with headquarters at Fort Leavenworth, and later, with the 2d Cavalry at Fort Ellsworth, Ks. Upon the reorganization of the Army he was appointed Major (July 28, 1866) of the new 42d U. S. Infantry, commanding it and the posts of Plattsburg and Madison Barracks, N. Y. (1866-69); also serving on various boards for the selection of a magazine gun, the examination of officers, and the investigation of the case of the first colored cadet at West Point. He received brevets to the rank of Brigadier-General U. S. Army, "for gallant and meritorious services" at the battles, respectively, of " Trevillian Station," "the Opequan," "Todd's Tavern" and "Cold Harbor,"
    Va., and was, at his own request, retired from active service, Dec. 15, 1870, "with the full rank (colonel of cavalry) of the command held when wounded." In recommending this officer for his highest brevet, General Sheridan wrote to the War Department as follows: "Colonel Rodenbough was one of the most gallant and valuable young officers, under my command, in the Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac. He was constantly in the field with his regiment, the 2d U. S. Cavalry (a portion of the time in command of it), from the spring of '62 up to the time of his being wounded whilst gallantly leading his regiment at the battle of the Opequan, September 19, 1864."
    Military Commissions: Second Lieut. 2nd U. S. Dragoons, March 27, 1862; First Lieut. May 14, 1861; Capt. 2nd U. S. Cavalry, July 17, 1862 Colonel 18th Penna. Vol. Cav., April 29, 1865; Major 42nd U. S. Infantry, July 28, 1866. Breveted as follows: Major, "battles of Trevillian Station, and Opequan, Va."; Lieut. -Colonel, U. S. A., " during the War" ; Colonel, U. S. A., "battle of Todd's Tavern, Va."; Brigadier-General, U. S. V.. "during the War"; Brigadier-General, U. S. A., "battle of Cold Harbor, Va."; Asst. Inspector-General, S. N. Y. (1879-82)

    BATTLES
    1862: "New Bridge, Va." (May 2); "Manassas" or "Second Bull Run" (Aug. 29-30). 1863; "Stoneman Raid" (April 23-30); "Beverly Ford" (June 9) slightly wounded; "Aldie" (June 17); "Middleburg" (June 18); "Upperville" (June 27); "Gettysburg, Pa." (July 1-3); "Williamsport" (July 6); "Boonesboro, Md." (July 8); "Funkstown" (July 10); "Falling Waters" (July 14); "Manassas Gap, Va." (July 21); "Brandy Station" (Aug. 1-2); " Culpeper C. H." (Sept. 13); "Bristoe Station" (Oct.).
    1864: "The Furnaces" (May 6); "Todd's Tavern" (May 8); "Ground Squirrel Bridge" (May 10); "Yellow Tavern" (May 11); "Meadow Bridge" (May 12); "Hawes' Shop" (May 28); "Old Church" (May 30); "Cold Harbor" (May 31-June 1); "Trevillian Station" (June 11-12) severely wounded; "Winchester" or "the Opequan" (Sept. 19) severely wounded.

    RETIREMENT
    Occupation After Retirement : Deputy Governor U. S. Soldiers' Home, Washington, D. C. (1870-71); General Eastern Agent, Pullman Car Co. (1872-73); Associate Editor Army and Xavy Journal (1876-77); Corresponding Secretary, Society Army of the Potomac (1878) ; Secretary and Editor of the Journal (1878-90) and Vice-President (1891-3) Military Service Institution of the United States; Chief of the Bureau of Elections, City of New York (1890-2); author of several essays, sketches and the following books: "From Everglade to Canon with the Second Dragoons" (1875); "Afghanistan or the Anglo-Russian Dispute" (1882); "Uncle Sam's Medal of Honor" (1887); "The Bravest Five Hundred of 'Sixty-one" (1891), and "Autumn Leaves from Family Trees" (1891).

    He married, Sept. 1, 1868 (at the Church of the Incarnation, N. Y. City, by Rt. Rev. W. H. Odenheimer, D.D., Bishop of New Jersey, assisted by the Rector, Rev. Henry Montgomery, D.D.), Elinor Frances, daughter of Passed Midshipman James Foster, U. S. N., and granddaughter of the late Rear Admiral John Berrien Montgomery, U. S. N..
    They had:
    (I.) Mary McCullagh, b. Detroit, Mich., Jan. 7, 1870 ; d. New York, Feb. 11, 1872.
    (II.) James Foster, b. Washington; D. C, Aug. 7, 1871 ; educated at Dr. Callisen's Academy, N. Y. City, St. Austin's School, Staten Island, and by special tutors. Is engaged (1891) as a member of Civil Engineer Corps of Lehigh Valley R. R. Co. (Pennsylvania.)
    (III.) Nina, b. New York, Oct. 8, 1874; educated at St. Mary's P. E. School (1881), Miss Comstock's Seminary (1888-89) in New York City, and at Bishopthorpe School, Bethlehem, Pa. (1890-91).

    Joseph Kinnersley Swift(5) (Charles(4), Henry(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born at Easton, Pa., Dec. 24, 1841. He was educated at private schools, and at an early age entered the counting room of Rodenbough and Brother, of Easton, Pa., and Phillipsburg, N. J. In 1862, his health being impaired by confinement in an office, he joined a party of civil engineers and assisted in the survey and construction of a part of the Lehigh Valley Railroad. In 1865 he became a member of the firm of Rodenbough Brother and Son, wholesale dealers in iron, coal and provisions (a business house founded by his father in 1832), from which he withdrew (upon the dissolution of the firm) in. He was a member of the " Easton Grays," P. N. G., became a Director of the Easton Bank (1882), Easton Cemetery, Northampton Mutual Fire Insurance Co., Easton Trust Co., President of the "Crypt" and Pomfret Clubs, Trustee of St. Luke's Hospital, Bethlehem, Pa., and is (1891) President of the Lehigh Water Company. Possessing an inherited taste for the mechanic arts, together with conservative but progressive business methods, personal tact and great energy, Mr. Rodenbough has been conspicuously connected with the improvement of his native town. He was one of the pioneers in promoting the development of the northern section of that city, particularly in the establishment and extension of the Paxinosa Improvement Company, of which he is (1891) President and General Manager. He married, October 5, 1865 (by Rev. C. H. Edgar, D.D.), Emily Harriet, third daughter of Russell S. Chidsey, Esq., of Easton, Pa. (See " Chidsey.")
    They had:
    (I.) Charles Russell, b. Easton, Pa., June 26, 1867; entered Lafayette College (class of 1888), taking Latin scientific course; became (1891) a manufacturer; m. April 15, 1891, Lillian H. Seitz, of Easton, Pa.
    (II.) Albert Churchman, b. Easton, Pa., July 4, 1870; educated at Easton High School and graduated at Lafayette College (1892).
    (III.) Frances Josephine, b. Easton, Pa., Feb. 25, 1875; educated at Miss Porter's School, Farmington, Conn. (1891-)

    Henry Smith(5) (John H.(4), Herbert(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born at Bethlehem, N. J.. June 24, 1808. He was educated at common schools and at Lafayette College (1840). After teaching school for a season, he was duly ordained a minister of the Gospel and, for forty-five years, was the pastor of the Providence Presbyterian Church at Trappe, Pa. He married, Dec. 26, 1840, Elizabeth Keely of Montgomery County, Pa. (b. Nov. 3, 1815). He died at Norristown, Pa., May 3, 1890.
    They had :
    (I.) Theodore Frelinghuysen, b. Sept. 14, 1844; m. Sept. 14, 1863 ; d. Norristown, Pa., Feb. 27, 1885.
    (II.) Adelia, b. March 18, 1847.
    (III.) Willie Crawford, b. May 17, 1850 ; d. July 19, 1851.
    (IV.) John Ner, b. Sept. 11, 1852 ; d. Dec. 30, 1862.
    (V.) Elizabeth Ann, b. Sept. 9, 1855 ; d. Aug. 2, 1856,
    (VI.) Hannah Crawford, b. June 16, 1857 ; d. Dec. 24, 1862.

    SIXTH GENERATION
    Theodore Frelinghuysen(6) (Henry S.(5), John H.(4), Herbert(3), John(2), Heinrich(1)) was born at Trappe, Pa., Sept. 14, 1844. He was educated by his father, and taught school for a short time; Deputy Recorder of Deeds, Norristown, Pa. (1872-78); bookseller and stationer (1878-84) ; Clerk of Council 1883-84, and Adjutant 51st Regiment, Penna. National Guard (1877). He was also a good musician, a member of Curtis Lodge 239, L O. O. F., of Consonance Chamber, O. K. F., and a citizen "whose sterling integrity won for him universal esteem." He married, Sept. 14, 1863, Margaretta Smith Shepps (b. Germany, Dec. 19, 1835), and died at Norristown, Feb. 27, 1885.
    They had:
    (I.) John Ner (b. Norristown, Pa., July 10, 1864; d. Aug. 11, 1864).
    (II.) Henry Shepps (b. Norristown, Pa., Dec. 14, 1868).
    (III.) George Smith (b. Norristown, Pa., Feb. 21. 1871).

    EASTON TO NEW ORLEANS IN 1825
    THE following extracts from the Diary of Charles Rodenbough of Easton, Pa., are interesting as indicating the primitive traveling facilities of the time and the impressions of a young American tourist in search of health and information.

    Nov. 8, 1895 At 12 o'clock left Bidlemansville, embarked on a Durham boat, for Trenton, and descended the Delaware twenty-seven miles.

    Nov. 9. Arrived at Trenton in time to secure passage on the steamboat to Philadelphia, where I landed at half past 5 p. m.

    Nov. 15. Having yesterday secured a seat in the mail stage for Pittsburgh, was awakened this morning at three o'clock to occupy it; got up with some unwillingness, as I had been to the circus, with C. I. Ihrie, the preceding evening. Although I left it at half past nine, it was nearly twelve o'clock before I got to sleep, in consequence of being obliged to overhaul my trunks and repack them after I came in from the circus. The performance was good. Upon taking my seat this morning, I found the company to consist of two gentlemen and two German ladies and their children ; all five unable to speak or understand a single word of English, and ourselves quite as ignorant of the German, really a cheering prospect for a day's ride of 100 miles! This, however, made no difference to the driver, for as soon as the old town-clock had counted four he drove us off at the rate of five miles per hour, and, ere the sun had gilded the east, we found ourselves fifteen miles from the city. Four o'clock found us dining in Lancaster, 64 miles from where we started, and eleven o'clock of the same evening set us down in Harrisburg, one hundred miles from Philadelphia; sleepy and tired and as ignorant of the German language as we were in the morning, notwithstanding the children kept up a constant chattering, sometimes singing, sometimes crying.

    Nov. 16. Left Harrisburg this morning at 8 o'clock, crossed the Susquehanna River on a bridge about a mile in length. The town is beautifully situated on its eastern bank in the midst of an extensive plain, has a number of handsome buildings, among which is the Capitol, built of brick, on a very commanding eminence near the river; the town, in size, is very like Easton. After passing through Carlisle and Shippensburg (the first a very handsome town nearly as large as Harrisburg, with better buildings, the last much smaller and in no way interesting) I arrived at Chambersburg, a distance of fifty miles, the last thirty-two of which I was the only and lonely passenger. The appearance of the country, through which the road passes, is very like that between Easton and Bethlehem.

    Nov. 17. Was called, at 3 o'clock this morning, to take my seat in the stage; after my baggage was in, and I was ready to start, inquired for my cloak; it was not to be found, the servant who took charge of it, when I came, could give no account of it. I directed him to inform the landlord of my determination not to leave until my cloak, or another as good, was produced. He made his appearance soon after and found that one of his boarders was absent, and in all probability had made a mistake and had taken my cloak instead of his own. As there appeared to be one without an owner, I proposed taking that for mine, to which he eventually consented. Fortunately it was rather better than my own, so that I had no reason to regret the change. When I got in the stage found myself the only passenger. The first ten miles was through a dreary country with here and there a solitary cabin in the bushes; being dark and very cloudy added to the general gloom, and several times induced me to think of mail robbers, and, at the same time, lay my hand involuntarily upon my pistol-belt to know how I was prepared for an attack of that kind, and finally prevailed so far as to make me think of a place of safety for my pocketbook; having some room in my boot-leg, I slipped it in and carried it there all day. Daylight brought the stage to the foot of the mountain, the ascent of which is four miles, and the descent as long; from the top I had one of the finest views I ever beheld; the perpendicular height of this mountain cannot be less than twelve hundred feet above the adjoining plain, on the eastern side upon which the town of Chambersburg is situated. It has about the same amount of population that Easton has, though much more the characteristics of a city; such, for instance, as those of a town-clock, and a night watch who parade the streets as regularly as those of Philadelphia. Soon after daylight this morning, the loneliness of my situation was relieved by the addition of two gentlemen from Nashville, in the State of Tennessee, who were returning to that place; in consequence of which I think myself fortunate, as they will travel my route at least 600 miles. I rode fifty miles this day over a very hilly country to a small town called Bedford, where I arrived about dark and had the satisfaction to find good accommodations; after being furnished with a good supper and while sitting round the fire in our room, we were gratified with a few tunes on the piano, by the landlord's daughter, in an adjoining room.

    Nov. 18. We were called to take our seats in the stage at three o'clock this morning, found it snowing and blowing and very cold withal; rode twenty miles to breakfast on the top of the Allegheny Mountains, after which continued our journey over the hills and through the storm, fifty miles further, to Greensburg, making seventy miles this day; the whole of which was performed over a road of constant hills, some of which were three miles from bottom to top; arriving between 8 and 9 o'clock.

    Nov. 19. We took our departure this morning at 4 o'clock. Rode twelve miles to breakfast, soon after which we passed the ever memorable battle ground, on which General Braddock was defeated and killed by the Indians, about twelve miles south of Pittsburgh; at which city we had the pleasure of finding ourselves safely landed, at 12 o'clock, after a rough ride of 300 miles, from Philadelphia, performed in four and a half days. Took lodgings at the Mansion House, kept by Col. Ramsay. During the afternoon took occasion to view the town, and present one of my introductory letters, which made me acquainted with a gentleman who, among other civilities, gave me an invitation to go to Church with him to-morrow, it being Sunday. Found the town just what you supposed New Orleans was, namely, very smoky and of course very dirty, occasioned by the exclusive use of stove coal for fire, the cheapness of which recommending it in all cases where fire is necessary; the coal delivered at the doors of the inhabitants being but 3 cents per bushel and 16 bushels are considered equal to a cord of oak wood. On account of the great quantity consumed, there is a constant fall of dust in the street; it is in appearance very much like lampblack and gives to the inhabitants, who are exposed in the street, a blacksmith's complexion.

    Nov. 20. At 11 o'clock this morning my new acquaintance called according to promise and took me to Church; when returning said he would call again after dinner, he did so, and went with me to hear an Episcopalian, who gave us as fine a sermon as I have ever heard de livered. During the day was made acquainted with Mrs. McKnight (that is the wife of my friend), with whom I returned from Church and took tea as well as spent the evening very pleasantly.

    Nov. 21. This day I visited the penitentiary, now building on the north side of the Allegheny River, in company with Mrs. McKnight and some ladies of her acquaintance. It is handsomely situated in the midst of a large plain about three hundred yards from the river, and when completed will be an elegant stone structure. Its form is that of a circle of one hundred yards diameter the height about 25 feet, built of freestone; it is intended for solitary confinement, i.e., each culprit will have an apartment to himself; these apartments are built of stone also, and arranged around the inside of the circular wall, ten feet square inside, seven feet high, the top being a stone arch. In the center of this little room is a large iron ring fastened in the floor for the purpose of chaining the prisoner. In crossing from Pittsburgh to this building we passed over the Allegheny bridge, the length of which is nearly half a mile and the height about fifty feet above the water. It is covered like the Easton Bridge, and has a footway on each side of the carriage passage with a partition between which protects the foot passenger from all dust of the wagons. On our return to the city this evening, when descending a steep hill, Miss B., and another lady, attempted to run down, in doing which Miss B. had the misfortune to come against a tree, by which she injured her breast and hand very much; it had like to have made our walk quite an adventure. Miss B. is from Germantown, near Philadelphia. She says Mr. Rodney is very popular in that place.

    Nov. 22, 23 were devoted to the examination of the nail and glass factories; of the latter there is none more extensive in the United States, nor any whose ware has a higher reputation, than this one. I saw some of the most beautiful specimens of cut glass that I have ever witnessed. I visited a paper mill also, the extent of which may be judged of when I say there were one hundred and twenty hands employed, among which were many females and small boys.

    Nov. 24. The forenoon of this day was spent in preparations for my journey to Cincinnati, to which place I am now convinced I shall be obliged to travel by stage, the distance 300 miles. Accordingly, at one o'clock this afternoon, I left this city in the mail stage for Washington, Penn., the company consisting of eleven passengers, four of whom are bound South, one to New Orleans.

    Nov. 25. After a rough ride of 27 miles, eight o'clock last evening set us down in Washington, a neat village, many of the buildings are of brick. It is situated on the National road near the western boundary of Pennsylvania. After three hours' disturbed sleep was called, at one o'clock this morning, to take my seat in the stage for Wheeling in Virginia, distance 30 miles, which we rode in six hours and before breakfast; after that necessary ceremony was performed we crossed the Ohio River in a ferry-boat propelled by two horses; found the river very low and about twice the width of the Delaware. Rode 25 miles in the State of Ohio to Fairview, an insignificant little place with two taverns and not much else.

    Nov. 26. Took my seat in the stage this morning at three o'clock; found a fine frosty moonlight morning; rode 57 miles this day to Zanesville on the Muskingum River, an active, well-built, little town of about one thousand inhabitants. A neat brick Court-house is among the public buildings, and there are a number of handsome dwellings built by the citizens.

    Nov. 27. Sunday. This morning I was permitted to take my breakfast before leaving. At nine o'clock we set off for Lancaster, distant 30 miles, where we arrived about dark. During the day we were gratified with specimens of the Ohio ladies and gentlemen in their Sunday attire, as many of them were going to and returning from Church. In the afternoon I walked on before the stage; while ascending a hill before I was overtaken, I came to a log meeting-house situated in the woods, in which were a congregation listening attentively to a zealous speaker. I had but a few minutes to hear before the stage came up but long enough to be reminded of times gone by.

    Nov. 28. After getting an excellent supper last night and sleeping four hours, we resumed our seats in the mail stage. It being moonlight, I had an opportunity to see the principal street, the buildings upon which are good, a large proportion of them are of brick, and the place has as much the appearance of comfort as any small town through which I have passed. Went eighteen miles, to Circleville, for breakfast; this is a county town, with a Court-house, jail, etc.. and the usual number of inns and stores; remarkable for nothing but the remains of extensive ancient fortifications. Immediately after leaving this place we crossed the Scioto River, a stream much like the Lehigh in size but not so rapid. Our road from here to another county town (30 miles from Circleville) where we arrived soon after sundown, lay through a most beautiful country, being the whole distance and as far as the eye could reach, on either hand, as level as the surface of a lake on a summer morning.

    Nov. 29. Having but twenty-two miles to travel this day, we were permitted to breakfast before we set off. Found the face of the country very similar to that through which we passed yesterday, occasionally finding the tall forest invaded by the hardy back-woods man whose residence and mode of living are rather romantic, though to me not at all enviable. Imagine an opening about the size of a small garden, (made in the midst of an overgrown forest where trees are like church steeples in height, and like hogsheads in the circumference) and in the center of this spot a building, ten or twelve feet square, composed of round logs fastened at the corners, laid up to the height of a man's head, covered with split boards on which large poles are placed to prevent the wind from carrying them off ; to one end of this cabin is attached a chimney made by short logs, being laid up like a pig-pen, and plastered inside with mud, a square hole cut through the logs of the main fabric for a fireplace; in the front another similar hole for a door, with a blanket hanging in the same to keep out the wind. Then another building situated on one side of the clearing constructed the same way and of the same material as those of the dwelling, for a stable and barn, and you will have a tolerably good idea of the usual improvements of a first settler in this, or in fact, of almost any other part of the western country. Notwithstanding, however, the forbidding appearance of this establishment, the traveler will find much of comfort and more of real hospitality reigning within, for the truth of which I can vouch. In the course of this day we passed through an extensive prairie or naturally clear country, upon which there has never been known any timber. They occur, frequently, in traveling through this country. At three o'clock we arrived at Wilmington, another county town and the end of this day's journey; found the place much crowded in consequence of this being Court week. After dinner I stepped into the Court-house to observe the appearance and manners of the natives, of which I found a great concourse, and of course as great a variety. Upon entering the Court-room, I was forcibly reminded of the Court held at Templeton, described in the "Pioneers"; the judges, the lawyers, the audience and the interior of the Court-house, as well as everything connected with it, seemed to be an exact counterpart of that described by Cooper; the effect was so like as almost to induce me to look round for Natty Bumppo, (Leather Stocking), and last, though not least, the interesting "Elisabeth".

    Nov. 30. This morning we took our departure at three o'clock had not gone far before it became very dark and soon after began to rain; about daybreak we crossed the Miami River, at this time an inconsiderable stream, though in certain seasons a large river. Eight o'clock found the stage at Lebanon, a small town, but some good buildings, where we breakfasted, having come 17 miles. After eating and changing horses, we continued our journey 35 miles to Cincinnati, where we arrived in six days from Pittsburgh, considerably fatigued.

    Dec. 1. Found me snugly quartered at Colonel Mack's Hotel, the accommodations at which are of the Philadelphia stamp, and of course draw many visitors, regular boarders as well as travelers, the number of both, I suppose, might be nearly 80 at dinner to-day. Having been favored by a friend in Philadelphia, with a letter of introduction to Mr. Neff, an extensive merchant of this city, I took occasion to present it this morning, and found him extremely polite and attentive in giving me all the information in his possession relative to the subjects upon which I inquired. After learning that a steamboat would leave here to-morrow for Louisville, at the falls of the Ohio River, I devoted the remainder of the day to the examination of the town and its improvements, with which found myself quite satisfied, it being equal to the printed descriptions circulated through the country which nine times out of ten, are much too highly colored, and consequently liable to give the stranger a very erroneous impression. The style of building is very neat and principally of brick, the town is laid out in squares like Philadelphia, and in fact the whole appearance of the place is so like it, that a stranger, transported from one to the other in his sleep would, upon waking, hardly suspect the change of situations, that is as far as this place goes, it being in extent about one-eighth of that of Philadelphia, or about 14,000 souls. The building of steamboats is going on here this winter very extensively. I saw ten or twelve new ones nearly finished, many of them of the first order. Its public buildings are not numerous yet, among them however are several neat Churches and a beautiful Courthouse; the society of the place has the reputation of being very good.

    Dec. 2. After supping with, and spending an evening very pleasantly, at my new acquaintances, I returned to my lodgings at ten o'clock last night with some regret that the nature of business renders a longer stay in this town impracticable; while walking with Mr. N. from his store to his house, he informed me that he had not been long keeping house (having been lately married), his furniture was not all received from Philadelphia, and at the same time requested that the absence of it might be excused. Upon entering his parlor, however, I found that, at least, very handsomely if not elegantly furnished; among other articles a very amiable wife was not least attractive. This morning was spent in making arrangements to continue my journey on board the steamboat, which got under way about 10 o'clock and proceeded down the Ohio River at the rate of six miles per hour. The width of the river between the banks varies from a half to one mile, but being very low at this time, is of course much narrower, and at this season of the year presents to the eye of a traveler very little that is interesting. At intervals of three or four miles he sees perhaps a small opening in the tall forest that is to be seen growing up on the rich bottoms and valleys of this noble river, and here and there a little village starting up, as it were, out of the stumps. In the course of this afternoon we passed the residence of General Harrison, of Indian War memory, situated near the bank of the river; buildings of brick and neat in appearance.

    Dec. 3. Sometime in the night a part of our machinery failed, and we were obliged, in consequence, to cast anchor in the middle of the river and there to remain all day for repairs.

    Dec. 4. When I awoke this morning, I found we were again in motion and about 12 o'clock arrived at Zanesville, in Kentucky, a very active place nearly as large as Easton. The buildings larger and mostly of brick, situated at the falls of the Ohio, 150 miles below Cincinnati and 330 from the Mississippi, following the course of the Ohio River. Here our worst foreboding was realized as regarded our mode of conveyance to the mouth of the Ohio; finding the water too low for steamboat navigation, myself and seven others engaged two carnages with four horses each, to carry us to the mouth of Cumberland River, 250 miles from this place.

    Dec. 5. I spent this day in viewing the town and steamboats at the landing, many of them very fine ones; altogether not less than ten or twelve were waiting for high water.

    Dec. 6. About one o'clock, this day, we took our seats in the carriages for the mouth of Cumberland, four in each; the four of us who had traveled in company for the last 400 miles, filled one, and four strangers the other; went 23 miles, through a level but new country, and stopped for the night.

    Dec. 7. Rose early this morning and drove on over a very hilly country, without any improvements, till twelve o'clock, for our breakfast; great complaints at the length of the road as well as anxiety for breakfast; after hurrying the landlord, we were permitted to sit down to a purely Kentucky meal; our bread was made of corn meal coarsely ground, and not sifted, mixed with water, baked in round cakes about the size of a dinner plate and two inches thick. With this we had liver and beefsteak fried to a crisp, strong coffee without cream, and no butter.

    Dec. 8. This morning we discovered that we might secure a better breakfast than we had yesterday, and accordingly took it before we departed, and before sunrise were on the way; rode about 40 miles and halted for the night. Soon after dark it commenced to rain; retired not without apprehension for the comfort of to-morrow's ride.

    Dec. 9. Quite surprised this morning to find it clear and rather cold; drove 35 miles this day, during which we passed through "Bowling Green," a little village of about 100 houses, and halted at sundown in "Shaker-town," inhabited and owned, together with the adjoining country, entirely by the Shakers (no doubt you recollect the description given of this singular and infatuated people by the author of "Redwood"). They have a community here of about 800 persons and these all grown or nearly so. Their creed not allowing them to marry, they have no children of their own; the men and women occupy different apartments for sleeping, calling each other Sister and Brother; many of their habits resemble those of the Moravians particularly in neatness and regularity; everything goes on like clockwork, it is all "yea," "yea " and "nay," "nay," with them. They are building two very large and beautiful brick houses for the accommodation of themselves in two families, a Sister's House and Brother's House. The supper and breakfast reminded me of New Jersey living. Supposing the opportunity a good one, I requested mush and milk to be put on the supper table, which, with an excellent apple pie made it seem like my late home.

    Dec. 10. This day we rode near forty miles, the weather quite cold, country thinly settled but with good roads. In order to pass away the time, as fast and pleasantly as possible, each contributed what he could by relating what he had heard and seen on his course through this "Vale of Tears." One of my companions was from near Albany, going to close some unfinished business in Louisiana, where he had spent ten years of his life; a second was a merchant now established at Memphis, a little village on the banks of the Mississippi in the State of Tennessee, but who had spent several years in the service of his country among the Indians; the third was also a merchant of the same place but younger than either of the others, and of course had not so much to regale us with, but being quite intelligent and having experienced some adventures, he excited, occasionally, our attention. I recollect one instance in particular: being the son of General Winchester, who was in command during the late War, he was taken into the service when about sixteen years of age, and underwent many hardships for one so young; he said that at the encampment of the American Army on the river Raisin, near Detroit, he became acquainted with a French girl, of about the same age as himself, who soon succeeded in gaining a place in his affections. The quarters of his father, the General, being at the house of the French girl's father, gave him frequent opportunities to indulge his partiality for the company of the daughter; but, "the course of true love never runs smooth," for the Americans were attacked at their encampment in the night by a superior force of British and Indians, whose bullets on the roof of the Frenchman's house were the first indication of danger to our young soldier. His first thought was of his fair one (this he declared to us himself, it is not my invention) and flew directly to her chamber, knowing where she slept, but when he burst in, what was his disappointment to find it deserted by her whom he wished to serve; she having, as he supposed, taken the alarm sooner than himself, and fled from her window, whither, he was never able to learn, nor her fate; but that of her father was certain, as he soon after saw his lifeless body lying on the ground near his former dwelling; the conflict soon became sharp and he found it necessary to look out for his own safety. The fortune of the day made him a prisoner, and wounded his father; this you will say, and say truly, is a long story and badly told.

    Dec. 11. Our road this day carried us through Hopkinsonville, a considerable village; rode 20 miles before breakfast and 20 after. which brought us to Princeton, a poor looking little town, though in a fine looking country; the tavern at which we stopped is a huge brick castle with an empty inside.

    Dec. 12. When we arose this morning found the snow had fallen three inches deep during the night; got a cup of coffee and drove 12 miles for our breakfast; having had corn bread for supper last night we thought ourselves happy when we saw miserable buckwheat cakes on the table this morning. Thirteen miles after breakfast brought us to Salem, a little town of about 50 houses, where we were glad to put up for the night, it being dark and most intolerably cold. After an excellent supper we retired for the night. This was the first place where we were annoyed by gambling.

    Dec. 13. After securing a very good breakfast we set off at nine o'clock, and, riding and walking 15 miles up and down hill, we found ourselves at the mouth of Cumberland River, 60 miles from the Mississippi. We decided upon rowing down the Ohio in a small boat which we soon bought and stored with two days' provisions, and at dark found ourselves five miles down the Ohio River; got lodging on a steamboat that was lying at the shore.

    Dec. 14. The coldness of my feet compelled me to rise early this morning and sunrise found us all on board our little bark, taking tours, by twos, of half an hour each; it being very cold, it was with difficulty that we kept ourselves from freezing; enjoyed our situation very much until after sunset, when it first occurred to us that we might have to take up our lodging, by a fire, on the bank of the river for the night, as we could not see any house. We of course looked out in good earnest for a light on the shore, and after rowing half an hour discovered, to our great joy, a log cabin on the bank, where we landed. Having come 30 miles this day, we were all much fatigued by rowing, and were very glad to get a place before the fire to lie down on the floor of the rudest cabin you ever saw inhabited.

    Dec. 15. Loud complaints were common this morning when we attempted to rise, on account of stiff joints; took breakfast and embarked on board our boat, and at three o'clock this afternoon arrived where we expected to meet a steamboat, but to our great disappointment there was none there.

    Dec. 16. Having now arrived within six miles of the Mississippi we supposed it would not be long before we should have the sight of a steamboat, and to avoid loss of time took passage on board of a "keel boat" that was going down the Mississippi, knowing that we could exchange our mode of conveyance whenever a steamboat might overtake us; in two hours we arrived at the Mississippi and found it so full of ice as to prevent our entering it.

    Dec. 17. After being ice bound, for two days, we, this morning, determined to venture out and try it. After arranging our force as necessity required, we launched forth into the stream and soon found ourselves employed, some in rowing and some in pushing off large cakes of ice by which we were now surrounded on all sides; a prospect anything but pleasing, as we were liable to be forced upon the snags, of which there was any quantity, and if we were, our fate was almost certain destruction. After navigating our boat ten or twelve miles, in a state of constant anxiety, and being much fatigued, it was deemed advisable to land, which was effected with great difficulty and some murmuring, there being a number in favor of continuing under way. Having landed on the Missouri shore, many of us took the opportunity of setting feet on its prolific soil and, thereby, enabling us to say we had been in the "State of Missouri." After ranging about through the forest until we were satisfied, we returned to the boat and found we had two, first-rate, flute performers among our number, who regaled us after supper with some excellent music. While the table was clearing off, I found that cards was to be the order of the evening; for of fifteen of us there were but two besides myself that did not play. Having been together two or three days, I have ascertained that our company consists of four Frenchmen, one doctor, one lawyer and a dozen merchants-with three married ladies and one spinster, children, servants, etc., etc.

    Dec. 18. This day we made but three or four miles, having headwind, as well as ice, to contend with. The banks of the river look very wild, not even a cabin for many miles, nothing but a close forest, growing to the edge of the bank, which is generally 50 feet high and yet is often over flown; and, when that happens, the water extends many miles from the river, as the banks are higher at the water than any other place.

    Dec. 22. The last two days were passed as the two preceding, gaining only 10 to 12 miles each day, with great exertion, the passengers taking turns at the oars, with the exception of three or four lazy fellows who always have some trifling excuse. This evening there was some dissatisfaction on account of our captain refusing to land at sundown; it got so high that one of the passengers struck the captain and threatened to throw him overboard if he did not permit the pilot
    to land immediately; the passengers seemed to have command of the boat, for the pilot was obliged to land agreeably to their wishes.

    Dec. 28. The last six days have passed as those last described with the exception of having no ice to contend with for the last two in consequence of which we made 25 or 30 miles each day. Last night we landed at an Indian encampment of some half a dozen families; we went to see them and found that they were picking cotton for a planter, their condition and appearance were miserable indeed; one of our company, the son of General Winchester, was able to converse with them, in their own language, which made our visit more interesting. This morning found us at Memphis, a little town that has lately sprung up and promises to become a place of some consequence. We have now been out on the Mississippi 10 or 12 days, and have run but 250 miles to this place and have yet 750 to New Orleans. About 4 o'clock we were gratified with the welcome sight of a steamboat, a few miles behind us, and in fifteen minutes had the pleasure of being taken off our uncomfortable as well as tedious boat by the steamboat Magnet, Captain Bickworth. We were so much pleased that we could not eat our supper; we now have a prospect of arriving at the end of our journey in the course of four or five days.

    Dec. 30. Yesterday we ran 100 miles; this day it has been snowing and blowing incessantly, notwithstanding which we shall run over a hundred miles from daylight to dark; we find ourselves very much crowded, there being about 40 cabin passengers and only twenty beds; of course we, who came on board last, fare worst. Having some acquaintance with the clerk I succeeded in getting a settee, upon which, rolled up in my cloak, I reposed in wakefulness, during the greater part of the night while some less fortunate are obliged to take
    their rest on the floor.

    Dec. 31. This day we passed the wreck of a steamboat that a few days since, on her way up the river, ran against a snag and sank in a few minutes; no lives lost. It has been quite cold all day.

    Jan. I, 1826. This morning introduces us to a new year, whether happy or otherwise, time alone can determine; be that as it may, allow me to wish you a new year of happiness and disappointments few. At 10 o'clock we arrived at Natchez, a handsome town on the banks of the river, 300 miles above New Orleans. Its situation is beautiful and in appearance healthy, but it has just recovered from the yellow fever, which has raged here for many weeks this season, and been more fatal than at New Orleans.

    Jan. 3. This morning at 8 o'clock we discovered the city and in one hour afterwards were landed alongside of this celebrated place, so long the object of our anxiety.

    Jan. 14. I have now been here ten days, during which I have presented my letters of introduction and collected necessary information to enable me to decide that there is no commercial inducement to remain here all winter; my letters being, fortunately, to some of the most respectable merchants in this city, I have had a good opportunity to make enquiry; from all I have been able to collect I am convinced that my time will be of more service at the North, in the spring, than here, and have, therefore, concluded to take passage for New York in the brig Ave Maria, Captain Wood.

    A MOTHER IN ISRAEL
    THERE are lives, unnoticed by the many, with little to the general eye that is remarkable in them, that yet are full of precious fruits. There are lives, whose stream scarce disturbed by a ripple seems almost motionless, that bear refreshing and enriching influences wherever they touch. There are lives, the tenor of whose way is quiet, even, calm, simple, noiseless, that give forth to the attentive ear strains of sweetest melody, lessons which speak of the love of heaven. The life of Mrs. Charles Rodenbough, now at rest, was such an one. Undemonstrative and retiring, to appreciate her worth one had need to know her well and nearly; and one, who so knew her, will bear such respect to the memory of her modest, shrinking disposition as to make his words few, and free from a praise that would offend her living.

    Emily Cauffman Rodenbough, daughter of Laurence and Sarah Shewell Cauffman, was born at Philadelphia, on May 6, 1806; she was baptized in the Roman communion, but confirmed by the Right Rev. Dr. Onderdonk, Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Pennsylvania, at Christ Church, Philadelphia. In the same parish church, on May 16, 1836, her marriage with Charles Rodenbough was solemnized, by the Rev. John Waller James. Her married life and the days of her widowhood were mainly passed in the Borough of Easton, where, on Monday of last week, the 11th of December, 1876, after a brief but distressing illness, surrounded by her devoted family, she departed this life to enter upon her life eternal.

    Mrs. Rodenbough was a devoted and earnest member of Trinity Church in this borough. From her earliest years she had learned to love its holy ways, its blessed services and its sacred seasons.

    She lived in Jesus, and now she rests in Him. He, only, knows how hardly she attained, and through what troubles was made perfect. But we have seen, and can testify, that her daily course amongst us here was beautiful with the loves and graces of a Christly character, and her life abounded with the new works of the Gospel, the works that spring out of a lively faith. Her nature was wondrously cheerful and cheering. Her sympathy was ever fresh and full and true. Was any sick? Her heart ached for all their pains. Was any troubled her spirit, too, was vexed until they found relief. Her constant rule, the law of her heart, seemed to rejoice with them that did rejoice, and to weep with them that wept. Many were the needy whom her shy bounty relieved, many the afflicted whom her tender kindness cheered. It was not in her to wait for the necessitous to press their wants upon her ; she would seek out the needy cause, and in all her giving was seen the delicacy of the Christian lady. We doubt not that her prayers and her alms have gone up for a memorial before God. and now she finds the treasures which she had laid up in heaven. Singularly esteemed by all who called her friend, cherished with deep affection by her kindred, she filled, as few can excel, all the natural relations of life; and now, all her earthly labors past, she enters upon the work of those ministering spirits, who delighting to do God's will, excel in strength, and "circle His throne, rejoicing."

    For we have a good hope; nay, we have a blessed assurance, that she died in the Lord. Absent from us, she is present with Him. which is far better. So let her rest, on whose fresh grave we would cast a garland twined with flowers that tell of a love which never shall decay. When Christ, who is our life, shall appear, then shall she also appear with Him in glory. Yet we love to dwell upon the sweetness of her memory. It blossoms, as the seed of her glorified body is planted in the bosom of the earth. "Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of His saints." God grant that the remembrance of her life may be powerful with those who loved her, calling them to forsake the sin she hated, to follow her in the path she trod, to the rest where she has




    Father: Johann Rodenbach b: 17 DEC 1678 in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Mother: Elisabeth Hafbach b: 02 APR 1681 in Dessau, Dessau, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany

    Marriage 1 Catherina Rockefeller b: 29 JAN 1713 in Segendorf, Neuwied, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
    • Married: 02 FEB 1729
    Children
    1. Has Children Johannes Rodenbach b: 21 FEB 1731 in Neuweid, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany

    Sources:
    1. Title: Ancestry Family Trees
      Publication: Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.;
      Repository:
        Name: Ancestry.com

      Note:
      This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created.
      Page: Ancestry Family Trees
      Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=11769650&pid=-401456075
      Note:
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